August 6, 2020

Australia government student visa fee relief for student effected by COVID-19

The Australian Government has been making several changes to visa requirements in recent weeks.

One of the most notable is that applicants will be given

additional time to hand over their English language results and
complete biometric and health checks, allowing future students who’ve been impacted by COVID-19 the chance to finish their visa applications.

In addition to these measures, Immigration Minister Alan Tudge has announced that current international students who will be unable to complete the requirements of their student visa due to COVID-19 will be able to lodge another student visa application free of charge.

This will certainly be warmly welcomed by the thousands of international students who’ve been worrying about what the future will hold for their education in Australia.

What is the fee waiver?

The fee waiver means that any international student who is unable to complete the requirements of their student visa due to the pandemic, will be able to reapply without paying the usual application fees. This fee waiver came into effect at midnight on Wednesday 5 August 2020.

A spokesperson for the Department of Home Affairs has confirmed that the waiver will only be available to students who had a valid visa from 1 February 2020:

“A visa application fee waiver will be available to students

who held a student visa on or after 1 February 2020 and
who were unable to complete their course within their original visa validity due to the impacts of COVID-19.”

This fee waiver will only apply to new applications and no refunds will be offered to those who applied before midnight 5 August 2020.

Even if you are eligible to receive the fee waiver, there are some extra steps that must be taken in order to receive the free application.

First, you’ll need to submit COVID-19 Impacted Students form from your education provider, in addition to your visa application.
This form will have to be signed by your education provider, showing how the pandemic has affected your visa requirements.

As well as fee waivers, the Australian Government has announced that the eligibility requirements for a post-study work visa have been relaxed. If you’ve been impacted by COVID-19 and are enrolled with an Australian education provider, you may be eligible for the following:

New or current student visa holders who have been forced to undertake online study outside Australia due to the pandemic will be able to count this toward the Australian Study Requirement.
Graduates who have been affected by the travel restrictions put in place to control the spread of COVID-19 will be able to receive a temporary graduate visa outside of Australia.

It’s clear from these announcements that the Australian Government wants to make sure that international students will be safe in the knowledge that they will be able to continue their education in Australia.

March 25, 2020

As you will be aware, Australia has introduced health and safety measures and travel restrictions to prevent the spread of the novel Coronavirus.

Confirmed cases by local health district (LHD) Across NSW – 25 March 2020

We understand this may be confusing if you’re commencing your studies, so read the below information to find out if you are impacted by the changes, and where you can go for support.

Will I be impacted?

Anyone hoping to travel to and from Australia will be impacted by the recent changes as the Australian Government announced that:

  • A travel ban will be placed on all non-residents and non-Australian citizens coming to Australia, effective from 9pm on Friday, 20 March 2020
  • all Australian and residents will be able to return and are required to self-isolate for 14 days
  • all Australians are advised to not travel overseas at this time. This is the highest advice level (level 4 of 4).

Information about Coronavirus is updated regularly, so it’s important to keep up to date with latest news from Australia.

For the latest information about the Coronavirus in Australia, visit these websites:

International students in Australia

All travellers to Australia from midnight, 15 March 2020 are required to self-isolate for 14 days. Self-isolating means you’re required to stay in your local accommodation. 

You’ll need to avoid going out into public spaces such as restaurants, supermarkets, workplaces, universities and any other public places that you will come into contact with people. Additionally, avoid receiving visitors into your home or local accommodation.

If you need more information on self-isolation, get more details by downloading  the Isolation Guidance information sheet from the Department of Health website. If you need to use public transport (e.g. taxis, ride-hail services, train, buses and trams.), kindly follow the precautions listed in the public transport guide.

If you’re starting your studies during the time you’re required to self-isolate, contact your school or university to discuss your study options. Many universities have put in place measures to assist students who are required to self-isolate, such as delayed semester starts or online study options.

If you, or any friends and family start showing flu-like symptoms such as a cough, fever, sore throat or shortness of breath, it is important to contact your local doctor. You can also monitor your symptoms using the Coronavirus (COVID-19) symptom checker. Call before you visit and explain your symptoms and travel history to ensure they are prepared to receive you.

If you require immediate and urgent medical attention, you can call 000. Any ambulance and hospital fees will be covered by your Overseas Student Health Cover (OSHC).

These measures are put in place to limit the possibility of spreading the Coronavirus to the general population.

How do I get food and other essentials?

Ask others who are not in isolation to get food and other essentials for you. If you are new to the country and don’t know anyone who can help you, you can order your food and groceries online.

Food delivery and ordering apps

Menulog

Deliveroo

Uber Eats

Happy Cow (vegan and vegetarian)

Open table

Groceries

Coles

Woolworths

Will this impact my university start date?

If you’re enrolled in Semester 1 2020 and unable to begin classes due to the travel bans or the 14-day self-isolation, you’ll need to get in touch with your university or school as soon as possible to discuss your enrolment.

Many Australian universities have delayed their semester start dates or have put in place changes to assist international students who have been impacted by the recent travel bans.

We recommend you contact your university or school as soon as possible to discuss your possible study options or deferring your studies to start at a later date. 

You can also check out the following websites for current advice and information that may assist you:

Curtin University

Federation University

Flinders University

Go8 Universities

Griffith University

La Trobe University

Macquarie University

Monash University

Queensland University of Technology

RMIT

Swinburne University

The Australian National University

The University of Adelaide

The University of Queensland

The University of Western Australia

University of Melbourne 

University of South Australia

University of Sydney

University of Technology Sydney

University of Wollongong

UNSW

Victoria University

Western Sydney University

Changes to student accommodation

If you have arranged for student accomodation and can’t travel into the country, then it’s vital you check in with your student accommodation about your next steps.

Some student accommodation providers may require you to provide additional information or may change or delay your accommodation arrangements.

Where can I go for support?

The outbreak of the novel Coronavirus presents an emotionally challenging situation for many international students. The spread of the virus may be causing you or your friends and family distress or anxiety, especially if you have loved ones in affected areas or have not been able to return home or to Australia because of the recent travel bans. 

The Australian Government have created a dedicated and multi-lingual support service for international students. You can contact them via email or phone 1300 981 621 (8:00 am–8:00 pm AEDST Monday to Friday). 

You can also visit the Australian Government Department of Education website to download the latest information, guides and FAQs for up-to-date general health and enrolment advice, where to access support services, and news on the latest immigration and border protection measures.

You can also access the links below:

Support for International Students affected by the Novel Coronavirus

Novel Coronavirus FAQ for International Students

Changes in international flight arrangements

If you have flight arrangements in place, your plans may be affected by travel bans or cancelled flights.

Many major airlines and countries are cancelling flights or restricting entry. If you have overseas travel plans, it’s important to regularly check your airline’s website or contact the airline directly for next steps and travel options at a later date.

Changes to IELTS testing

There are currently changes being made to IELTS testing. Visit the IELTS website to find out if the changes will affect you.

December 14, 2017


Australia’s international education industry has strengthened across the board, pushing student numbers to new record levels according to the latest data. But doubts have started to emerge over how long the country can maintain its growth streak.
Records continued to fall for Australian international education, but clouds are starting to form, as the country’s reliance on China increases.
The number of international students within Australia currently sits at 9.4% above the 554,200 for the whole of 2016

Year to October data, released by the Department of Education and Training, shows more than 606,700 international students have entered Australia so far in 2017, a 13% increase from the level achieved by the same time in 2016, while enrolments and commencements also experienced double-digit percentage growth.

“The more Australia can do to discover or seek out new markets, the better for the international education sector as a whole”
The surge in numbers has also pushed up total revenue, with the Australian Bureau of Statistics indicating the 12 months to September period grew to a landmark $29.4bn, up from $28.4bn last quarter.
The figure for students, enrolments and commencements as of October has already surpassed that for the whole of 2016.
The number of international students within Australia currently sits 9.4% above the 2016 total of 554,200, while enrolments and commencements – the number of new enrolments in a calendar year – are 7.5% and 2% higher, respectively.
English Australia noted September 2017’s figures were 6.7% down from September 2016
While the figures are welcomed in Australia, not all sectors and source markets experienced consistent improvements, casting doubt over how long the boom will last.
Although 3.3% above the previous year’s October figures, ELICOS stands alone as the only sector to not yet surpass 2016 totals, and after a strong first half of 2017, experienced two consecutive declines in commencements in August and September.
It was the only major sector to do so.
In its latest market analysis report, English Australia noted September 2017’s figures were 6.7% down from September 2016, representing “arguably the first poor month at the national aggregate level for ELICOS in recent years.”
Meanwhile, China further strengthened its position as Australia’s top source market, increasing 18% from the same period in 2016 and pushing its market share across all sectors from 27.5% to approximately 30%; reaching as high as 60% for some sectors.
source:  thepienews.com

[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]

 

November 22, 2017

According to the Migration Legislation Amendment Regulations 2017 that came into effect on 18th November 2017, an existing condition, 8303 has been amended to expand its scope. Under the new migration rules, many Australian temporary visas will be subject to a condition that will enable the Immigration Department to cancel a person’s visa if they are found to be involved in online vilification based on gender, sexuality, religion, and ethnicity.
Before 18 November 2017, the condition that earlier applied to only a few visas, is now applicable to most temporary visas applied for on.  This condition now also applies to

  • temporary graduate visa (Subclass 485)
  • skilled regional (485),
  • student visa and
  • visitor visa.

The Immigration Minister now has the power to cancel a visa if there is evidence of a visa holder engaging in harassment, stalking, intimidation, bullying or threatening a person even if it doesn’t amount to a criminal sanction. These activities may include public ‘hate speech’ or online vilification targeted at both groups and individuals based on gender, sexuality, religion, and ethnicity.
The Department of Immigration says that the new change: “It sends a clear message, explicitly requiring that the behaviour of temporary visa holders is consistent with Australian government and community expectations.  It advises visa holders what sorts of behaviour can result in visa cancellation.”
The Immigration Department says its officers have the discretion to determine whether the condition has been breached. They also have the discretion to not cancel the visa even when the condition has been breached.
No one should break the law but even behaviour that may not necessarily warrant a criminal sanction can be deemed a breach of this condition. So it is important to remember that your actions online may have consequences just like your real-life actions.

July 3, 2017

Almost nine out of 10 international students studying in Sydney would recommend the city to their friends as a place to live and study, despite persistent complaints about the high cost of public transport and accommodation, according to the first major research done on the experiences of international students in Australia.
Sydney attracts more of Australia’s $20 billion international student market than any other city, with about 50,000 enrolled at university and another 50,000 at vocational and English-language institutions in the city last year, according to federal data.

The size of the international student community in the city, and their ability to promote Sydney around the world, drove the City of Sydney to commission UTS to undertake the research.
“International students make a real contribution to Sydney’s prosperity, they add so much to our cultural life and down the track help to connect our city back to their homes around the globe,” Lord Mayor Clover Moore said.
“When students go home, we hope they will talk about their time here, encouraging their peers to follow in their footsteps. Some may even return with families to take up key roles as their careers develop. It all adds to Sydney’s standing as a global city that attracts and retains talent.”
While Sydney was generally seen as a desirable and safe location to study in, a minority of students surveyed reported exploitation by employers and landlords, discrimination and isolation.
Two students described how “international students don’t get treated in the same way as local students do”.
Concerns have been raised in the past – including by vice-chancellors – that international students are treated like cash cows by the Australian government and universities.Chinese student Jing Su has enjoyed her time in Sydney despite the cost of living.

But if they agreed, respondents to the survey seemed mostly too polite to say so.
UNSW postgraduate student Jing Su, 28, from Quanzhou in south-east China, first saw Sydney in the opening ceremony of the 2000 Olympic Games.

“I always wanted to go to the US but I have two friends who have done their education here and gone back to China, and when I asked their advice, they said:’You should go to Sydney, it’s actually a great place for us’. And I always liked the beach and sunlight.”
Ms Su said she had found it relatively easy to find accommodation – a homestay arrangement with a family in Clovelly, who she is teaching Mandarin – and casual work during her university holidays, but that costs were high.

“The tuition fees are way expensive for international students,” she said. “We pay several times more than the locals, plus we have to find our accommodation and travel costs. It’s quite expensive.”
Breaking down barriers between different cultural groups was also difficult.
“[For] a lot of my friends it’s a little bit hard for them,” she said. “I don’t know why. When we walk into the classroom they automatically sit in their group. Back in China we’re not used to how if you have a question you just raise up your hand, we think that’s interrupting the teacher. But this is changing a lot as well from my generation.”
Linus Faustin is a 22-year-old UTS communications student from Tanzania, who has been in Australia since 2015.
“Finding work is a challenge,” he said, not least because there is “discrimination against international students”.
He said it was unfair that international students do not get the same public transport concessions as locals. “It’s about time for equal fares. International students already pay so much to be able to study full-time,” he said.
Mr Faustin said experiencing racism on public transport was common, but it is not just international students who are victims.
The UTS research was based on online surveys and interviews conducted in mid-2016.

Eighty per cent of respondents enjoyed studying in Sydney, 88 per cent of students said they would recommend Sydney as a place to study, 66 per cent of students had completed paid work, with 82 per cent of those saying they were treated fairly at work and 55 per cent said they received help finding a place to live when they arrived in Sydney.
Major concerns before arrival were the cost of living, finding a job and being able to speak English, but these concerns diminished during their stay.

Sydney’s universities have benefited enormously from the international student boom during the last decade, reaping fees of up to four times what local students pay to attend the same course.

In October 2016, the most recent figures available, Australia had 683,000 international student enrolments, with the largest share – 256,875 – in NSW. The majority of these – 72,429 – were from China, followed by India, Thailand, Brazil and Indonesia.

June 29, 2017

Image result for migration to australia timelineAustralia is one of the great country to get a first-rate education, but also it is a wonderful place to live and work. Many international students who study in Australia choose to apply for permanent residency after they finish their studies.
As an overseas student on a student visa you can apply for permanent residency under Australia’s General Skilled Migration program (GSM).
There are many different types of permanent residency visas but Skilled – Independent (Residence) visa (subclass 885) focuses on skilled migration for students who have graduated from Australian study.
When you’re considering applying for an Australian visa, whether temporary or permanent,  it’s very important that you obtain a proper eligibility assessment  from accredited professionals, based on your own personal circumstances.
For example: eligibility for Australian permanent residence involves more than passing a points test, so it’s vital your whole situation is considered before you apply and risk a visa refusal and losing your application fee of AUD $2,525.
If you are not eligible now, it’s also important to get proper advice to maximize your chances of eligibility in the future eg you may be eligible for permanent residence after studying in Australia.
Our immigration lawyers, migration agents and education counsellors are very experienced; we can answer all your questions and assess your eligibility for all Australian visas including temporary work visas and permanent residence. This will save you lots of time and money.
Contact us now at sydney@inteducation.com for our personal visa eligibility assessment service which includes advice on all your options to live, work and study in Australia.
Visa Agency – Australia is an experienced talented team of immigration lawyers, migration agents and support staff dedicated to providing outstanding migration services to our many clients locally, nationally and around the world.
We have a reputation for:

  • understanding our client’s individual needs
  • finding solutions to those needs
  • service excellence
  • exceptional legal knowledge
  • achieving results
  • exceeding our client’s expectations, and
  • excelling in the practice of immigration law

Our support staff are specially chosen for their dedication to hard work and their commitment to never being happy with second best.  They are committed to assisting you and satisfying your individual needs.
We take very seriously and honour our high professional and ethical obligations to our clients. As lawyers we are bound by the strict ethical confines of the NSW Legal Profession Act and as migration agents we are bound by the strict rules, regulations and ethics of the Commonwealth Migration Act and the Migration Agents Code of Conduct.
We provide our team with free access to compulsory on-going legal and professional education as well as access to continuous hands-on learning opportunities. The result is a very happy, motivated, well-educated team at your service. It is no secret that we strive for excellence in all areas of our practice.

Mrs. Feriha Guney
Independent Consultant Migration Agent

  • Member: Migration Institute of Australia
  • Migration Agent (MARN: 0960690)
  • Education Conusltant (QEAC: C102)

You can access the CODE of CONDUCT
For further details contact migration@inteducation.com

 

International students who are

  • · between the ages of 18 and 44 and
  • · have completed at least two years of approved full-time study in Australia

can apply for permanent residency under the ‘Skilled – Independent (Residence) visa (Subclass 885)’.
For more information about who can apply for this visa, see below and visit the Australian Government’s Department of Immigration and Citizenship website atwww.immi.gov.au/skilled/general-skilled-migration/885/index.htm or contact to qualified migration agent partner that work with International Eductaion Agency – Australia.
IEA-A works with qualified migration Agent Partner is also registered as e-visa qualified migration agent for number of countries such as India. China, etc.
In order to qualify for the General Skilled Migration program, students need to satisfy a number of requirements relating to:
· Your study undertaken in Australia: you must have completed either a single qualification (degree, diploma or trade in an Australian institution, in English, registered with CRICOS) that required two years of full-time study, or more than one qualification resulting in a total of at least two years full-time study in Australia. You must apply for your visa within six months of finishing your study.
· Your location: you must be in Australia to lodge your visa application and receive the application decision.
· Your skills and qualifications: your skills and qualifications must meet the Australian requirements of your nominated occupation.
· Your health: you must undergo a medical examination and meet minimum health requirements.
· Your character: you must be able to prove that you are of ‘good character’. You will be required to provide certified copies of police checks and other relevant documents, such as any relevant military discharge papers.
The points test
In addition to the requirements above, students must get pass mark from a points tests in order to be granted permanent residency in Australia.
A minimum of 120 points must be scored on the points test for the application to be successful. Applicants score points according to how they rate for different criteria relating to:
· age
· nominated skilled occupation ( only 50 or 60 points from Skilled Occupation Lists)
· English language ability
· specific work experience
· occupation in demand / job offer
· Australian qualifications
· having completed an approved qualification in an area classed as ‘Regional Australia’ or ‘low population growth metropolitan area’
· spouse skills.
Bonus points are available for applicants who satisfy the requirements of one of the following additional categories: ‘Australian work experience’, or ‘Fluency in one of Australia’s community languages’.
Consult your qualified Migration Agent partner through International Education Agency – Australia.
If you don’t meet the above requirements you may be able to apply for the new ‘Skilled – Graduate’ visa (subclass 485).
‘Skilled – Graduate’ visa (subclass 485). temporary visa is designed to give students who have completed at least two years study in Australia but who do not meet the requirements for a permanent GSM visa the opportunity to stay in Australia for up to 18 months to gain the additional skills they need for permanent residency.
The Australian Government skilled migration program targets young people who have skills, an education and outstanding abilities that will contribute to the Australian economy.
International students with Australian qualifications account for about half the people assessed under the skilled migrant program. For up-to-date information on the program, contact the qualified Migration Agent Partners that works with My Study in Australia office in Sydney.
Options for extending your stay
The following table outlines your visa options to extend your stay in Australia. Please take this as an guideline and consult qualified Migration Agent Partners that works with My Study in Australia office in Sydney.

Reasons for further stay

Visa Options

Continue your studies

Apply for a new student visa.
My Study in Australia Student counsellors can assist you.

To have your PhD thesis assessed

Attend your graduation ceremony

Apply for a visitor visa.
Consult a qualified migration agent partner from International Education Agency – Sydney.

Have a holiday

For work, travel or for completing a professional year

If you are successfully completed 2 y, an acceptale F/T study in Australia, you may apply for a work visa, e.g. Skilled – Graduate (Temporary) visa (subclass 485)
This visa allows overseas students who do not meet the criteria for a permanent General Skilled Migration visa to remain in Australia for 18 months to gain skilled work experience or improve their English language skills – two things that may enhance their chances of gaining Skilled Migration.
Holders of this visa may apply for permanent residence at any time if they are able to meet the pass mark on the General Skilled Migration points test.
This visa allows the qualified Graduate and any secondary applicants included in their visa application to remain in Australia for up to 18 months with no restrictions on work or study. During 485 visa holders may:
· travel
· work
· study to improve your English skills
· Complete a professional year.
Please take this as an guideline and consult qualified Migration Agent Partners that works with My Study in Australia office in Sydney.

Permanent residence in Australia

If you are successfully completed 2 y, an acceptable F/T study in Australia, and if you are qualified to apply for Permanent Residency,

Please take this as an guideline and consult qualified Migration Agent Partners that works with My Study in Australia office in Sydney.

PERMANENT RESIDENCY

Many international students who have graduated from Australian institutions apply for Independent Skilled Migration programme through International Education Agency – Australia’s qualified Migration Agent partners. There is a special category for International Students who have studied in Australia.
You may be eligible to apply if you have studied a course that scores 50 or 60 Points on the Skilled Occupation List (SOL). See http://www.immi.gov.au/allforms/pdf/1121i.pdf. To achieve recognition in one of these Skilled Occupations, you need to meet the criteria set down by the relevant Assessing Body.
To find out if your course qualifies you to apply for Permanent Residency, you will need to have your skills assessed by the relevant body, shown beside the occupation on the SOL. The SOL changes from time to time, so there can be no guarantee that if an occupation is on the list when you commence a course that it will still be there when you graduate. The list is based on areas where Australia has skills shortages.
Please contact you’re my Study in Australia Student Counsellor to have up-to-date information on qualified courses.

  • Most Trades – e.g. Hairdressing, Commercial Cook, Pastry Cook, Baker, Greenkeeper, Nurseryman, General Gardener, Automotive mechanic, Electronic Equipment Tradesperson, General Clothing Tradesperson, Dressmaker, Graphic Pre-Print Tradesperson, Aircraft Maintenance Engineer- assessed by TRA may require:
    • AQF Certificate III – CRICOS registered
    • 2 years of study
    • 900 Hours relevant work experience
    • Workplace assessment
  • Associate Professionals
    • e.g. Community Welfare Workers – assessed by AIWCW – require study of an accredited course. See www.aiwcw.org.au
  • Professionals
    • Bachelor degree (3-4 years e.g. Information Technology, Accounting, Nursing, Teaching…) or
    • Post Graduate Diploma or Masters
      • There are a number of programs which are open to graduates of any recognised degree, and set graduates up for recognition as
        • Information Technology Specialists ACS
        • Accounttants-CPA
        • Teaching-TA
        • Nurses

Please seek migration information from a qualified migration agent Partners that works with My Study in Australia office in Sydney.
If you have an overseas qualification that has been assessed as not meeting Australian requirements, please contact our counsellors to find out what courses are available to assist you to gain the recognition needed.

June 9, 2017
 Five Australian university are among the world’s top 50 universities and 7 are in the top 100, according to a major global ranking that shows Australian universities have made overall improvements in all measures, including teaching, employability and research.
Australian National University is the highest ranked in the country at 20th place in the 2018 QS World University Rankings.
It is followed by the University of Melbourne, ranked at 41, the University of New South Wales at 45, the University of Queensland at 47 and the University of Sydney at 50.
Monash University, with a rank of 60, and the University of Western Australia at 93 round out the seven Australian universities in the top 100.

An institution’s rank is determined by its academic and employer reputations, student-to-faculty ratio, citations per faculty, and international faculty and student ratios.
A total of 37 Australian Government universities are included in this year’s ranking, which covers 959 universities around the world and measures performance in research, teaching, employability and internationalisation.

Belinda Robinson, chief executive of peak sector body Universities Australia, said the ranking is especially important to international students choosing a university.
“Global rankings are a major factor for many international students in deciding where to study, so they’re also very important to the $22.4 billion a year that international students bring into Australia’s economy,” Ms Robinson said.

“These impressive rises underscore the global competitiveness of Australia’s universities and the excellent quality of our education and research on the world stage.”

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is the top ranked university in the world for the sixth consecutive year, followed by Stanford University, Harvard University, the California Institute of Technology, the University of Cambridge, the University of Oxford, University College London, Imperial College London, the University of Chicago and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology.

MIT has been described as “the nucleus of an unrivalled innovation ecosystem” by QS Quacquarelli Symonds, the education analysis firm behind the ranking, which notes that companies created by the university’s alumni have a combined revenue of $2 trillion, the equivalent of the world’s 11th largest economy.
Research director at QS Quacquarelli Symonds, Ben Sowter, said the improved ranking of Australian universities can be partially attributed to the changing political climate in countries such as the US and UK increasing Australia’s comparative popularity.

“Higher internationalisation scores certainly reflect coherent international outreach efforts made by university marketing departments,” Mr Sowter said. “However, they also reflect the increased desirability of Australian higher education in the light of current political situations in the United States and United Kingdom – typically Australia’s main Anglosphere competitors.
“Improvements in scores for Academic Reputation can be attributed to both the type of teaching innovations … and the standard of research emanating from Australia’s universities.”

 
 
Source: smh.com.au

May 29, 2017

MARA Code of Conduct

The MARA (The Migration Agent Registration Authority ) Code of Conduct for registered migration agents is set out in legislation to regulate the conduct of registered migration agents. It prescribes registered migration agents’ obligations towards your clients.
Provision for a Code of Conduct for migration agents is set out in Section 314 of the Migration Act 1958 and is prescribed in Schedule 2, Regulation 8 of the Migration Agents Regulations 1998.
Code of Conduct for registered migration agents (419KB PDF)
Feriha Güney has number of years of experıence as Education Consultant Badge thumb QEAC C102 and registered Migration Agent (MARN 0960690)

January 2, 2017

Usually Education agents assist international students to secure a place in an Australian school. While institutions can enrol students directly, they also work with the global student agent network such as IEA-A International Network. You may choose to use a qualified education agent, usually known as a student counsellor, academic adviser, or student recruiter in your home country, or one based in Australia, to guide you through the process of choosing a school and enrolling.
Also based on your home country, your education agent with deep knowledge of Australian visa system, will manage your student visa application that could be critical for getting your student visa successfully. IEA-A has Australian office and in your local country so our services start in your country and continue in Australia.
Why you need a Qualified Education Agent Counsellor ? 
Education agents help reduce the stress of choosing a school in another country. Understanding your options, with someone who speaks your language, can be very reassuring. It is important through that that your agent is knowledgeable, up-to-date on student visa and curriculum changes, and has your best interest at heart. We hear stories of students who arrive for their first day of class to find out that the school has never heard of them. The education agent industry can attract unethical people, so do your research to make sure you are working with a good agent!
In this section, we provide guidance on using agents. Our qualified principal Migration Agent and education councillor Mrs. Feriha Guney (Qualified Education Agent Counsellors QEAC number: C102). (Migration Agent – MARN:0960690) is one of the industry expert with over 15 years of experience and thousands of satisfied international student, can assist you herself or with a number of education counsellors or migration Agents/Lawyer work with her. 
Some of the benefits of using a qualified education agent 
If you agent is not qualified or experienced could cost you not only your visa fee or time but also he/she can damage your education career and even may change your life. On the other hand a qualified and experienced education agent, coudl help you to build your education career and even after a successful life, by doing:

  • conduct an interview to understand your needs and goals
  • make suggestions for the best institutions and programs to help you reach your goals
  • assist you to collect all of the documents you will need for your application
  • guide you through the application process
  • review your statement of purpose and provide information on interview process
  • guide you through the visa process once you have been accepted by an institution
  • help you prepare for the move and your arrival in Australia
  • organisation of airport pick-up and accommodation
  • provide information on how to find job in Australia and regulations
  • provide information on how to get Australian Tax number if you want to work
  • provide information on how to open bank account
  • provide information on how to get Australian Mobile Phone services
  • provide information on how to extend / change your visa while you are studying (may require additional fee)
  • provide information on how on Graduate work visa after your graduation of apply   (may require additional fee)
  • provide information on how to apply a permanent skill visa

Education agents fees
When working with an agent, is very important to understand how the agent makes money. You will find that most experienced and qualified education agents offer their services for understanding your education career, checking your “statement of purpose” as well as preparation for the interview, finding right school for your education purpose, helping you to have school acceptance, counselling and the enrolment process fee which it depends of the country of application (as requirements for each country is different). 
Although some inexperienced agent may offer their services free of charge, you should question their qualification and experiences that may cost your education career or even change your life forever. In addition to that you may or may not be charged for any school application fees that arise such as the school assessment (the schools charge the agent for this service). You will also be charged for the visa application fee which is paid to the government of Australia.
If you are applying in Australia, IEA-A usually will not charge you a fee. However if you are applying from overseas and if your home country considered in a risky country, there yoru application need to be prepared professionally and reviewed by expert before making application, so we may charge you an application fee.
Best Agent location – in your home country or in Australia or in both?
Should you use an agent in your country, or one based in Australia? There are benefits and drawbacks to each options.
IEA-A usually offer both location support, in your home country for visa application and assessing your application according to your home country requirements, in Australia for on-going help and support. This way you have benefit of Using an education agent based in your country,  you are dealing with somebody who is local and understand your education system.
Education Counsellor in your home country should also be very knowledgeable about visas for nationals of your country. The interview process can take place over the phone or face to face in your native language, and all the paperwork and applications can be processed locally.  
When an education agent located in Australia, you have representation when you arrive, and can expect very good relationships with, and knowledge about, Australian education providers. Your agent can assist with airport pickup, accommodation, and in some cases even help you to understand how you can get a job while you are studying.
How do I know if an agent is knowledgeable?
The migration agent system is regulated by the Australian government. Registered migration agents can counsel on migration visas, student visas, or both. If you are working with a migration agent who is also a student agent, we suggest you use one who is registered with the Office of the MARA to ensure they are up-to-date on visa rules. In addition, you can also find out whether a night and overseas agent has been banned from working in migration.
Although it is not mandatory, the Qualified Education Agent Counsellors qualification managed by  the PIER Education Agent Training, ensures an agent understands student visas and regulation, especially if you are working with an education agent in your country. The qualification is not mandatory currently, but it can be a good indication of the quality of the agent. See if your agent has right qualification.  
All IEAA Education counsellors and migration Agents have required qualifications and lead by our principal Director Ms. Feriha Guney who has both qualification as Registered Migration Agent and Education Agent  (Mrs. Feriha Guney (Qualified Education Agent Counsellors QEAC number: C102). (Migration Agent – MARN:0960690 ) and over 15 years of experience on both fields.  
If you want to check your eligibility as a student visa o study ion Australia, send your resume and write to us on sydney@inteducation.com.

December 3, 2016
December 3, 2016

australian_universities_map_may_2014
Australia is home to 43 universities with at least one university main campus based in each state or territory.
The Australian Universities map allows you to see where each university’s main campus is located. Most universities have more than one campus and are located across multiple states and territories, providing you with a choice of where in Australia you would like to study.

List of Australian Universities

Australian Capital Territory

New South Wales

Northern Territory

Queensland

South Australia

Tasmania

Victoria

Western Australia

source: www.studyinaustralia.gov.au