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March 8, 2013

 

Nearly three-quarters of Australians believe international students should be encouraged to stay in the country after completing their university studies, according to a survey.

Universities Australia has released research on perceptions of the tertiary sector on the eve of this week’s higher education conference in Canberra.

About 80 per cent of 300 business representatives surveyed and 72 per cent of 1000 members of the public said international students should be encouraged to stay in Australia on completion of their studies, particularly if sponsored by an employer.

”However, some stakeholder respondents have voiced concerns that the university system is perceived to be too heavily reliant on income from international student enrolments,” the report said.

”There is also a view that additional support, for instance with English language learning and better facilities such as affordable student housing, may be required.

”Participants were generally comfortable about the proportion of internationally students, at roughly 20 per cent.”

The study found Australian universities were generally well regarded, with 88 per cent of the surveyed public saying they would encourage their child or young people they knew to attend university.

Most saw the main role of universities to educate for skilled/professional jobs, with far fewer identifying the sector’s contribution to research and development – something Universities Australia described as being of ”some concern”.

Universities Australia chief executive Belinda Robinson said the study showed that people strongly valued international students, who helped build deep cultural ties with their fellow students and the wider community.

”International students are also playing a pivotal role in increasing our engagement with Asian nations during this Asian Century,” she said.

”They are helping Australia forge valuable links with their home countries, providing a cross-cultural dialogue with domestic students and sustaining ongoing relationships with Australia in their post-student lives.”

A spokesman for Universities Australia said the polling involved qualitative and quantitative research, including focus groups and surveys of the public and business.

He said the data was weighted to be representative of the Australian population and the whole business community.

The higher education conference, running from Wednesday to Friday, will include keynote speeches by new Tertiary Education Minister Chris Bowen, Opposition Leader Tony Abbott, Universities Australia chairman Glyn Davis, and former Treasury secretary Ken Henry.

 

By Daniel Hurst Feb. 26, 2013

Source: NewCastle Herald

November 9, 2012

 

The Australian National University (ANU) and University of Canberra have increased their international student numbers, bucking the national trend. So far this year the ANU has enrolled 5,392 international students. That is 40 more than in 2011. At the University of Canberra (UC) overseas students increased by 4 per cent in semester one to 2,130. Nationally, the number of international students has fallen 7 per cent for the year to September, with several interstate universities blaming the high Australian dollar.

ANU Professor Marnie Hughes-Warrington says the national capital remains an attractive place to study. “What it comes down to is reputation for the quality of study, research reputation. Even simple things like is the environment a good place to live and is it a safe place to live?” she said.”All of those things are big ticks for Canberra.”

Professor Hughes-Warrington says the biggest growth has been in post-graduate study. “There’s an evolution towards graduate offerings and research offerings at ANU,” she said. “We’re seen as really strong in those areas because we’re such a strong research institution. We are increasingly seeing ourselves as a graduate destination of choice for students from around the world.”

 

SOURCE: ABC Online

By Clarissa Thorpe

October 30, 2012

IEAA glad to announce that after lobbying number of years, Australian NSW Government agreed to give student travel discounts for International Students.  The NSW Government has announced public transport fare discounts for international students as part of ongoing efforts to promote the State as a world-class location for international education.

 

Premier Barry O’Farrell made the announcement in India, where he is currently promoting NSW’s education credentials as part of a trade mission, while Acting Premier and Minister for Trade and Investment Andrew Stoner was joined at the University of Sydney by Parliamentary Secretary for Tertiary Education and Skills Gabrielle Upton and Acting Vice-Chancellor Professor Stephen Garton.

“International education is the State’s second biggest industry in terms of exports – worth $6 billion,” Mr O’Farrell said. “We have world-class universities, vocational institutions and research organisations, but we need to do more to attract international students seeking high quality education, cultural and employment experience. “The travel concessions announced today will increase the attraction of NSW as an ideal location for further education and provide better access to safe and affordable public transport options for overseas students.”

Mr Stoner said the changes mean international students will soon have access to public transport travel discounts of up to 35 per cent. “Enhancing NSW’s reputation as a highly regarded location for international education and research will be critical to our efforts to position the NSW economy for growth in the next decade,” Mr Stoner said.

“The new travel concessions are a direct response to a recommendation from the NSW Government’s International Education and Research Taskforce which released its final report today.”

Mr Stoner said the Taskforce’s final report outlines 21 specific recommendations for Government and Industry to help position NSW as a global leader in international education by 2021. “We have already begun acting on a number of matters highlighted by the Taskforce, with the NSW Strategy for Business Migration & Attracting International Students released earlier this year calling for the extension of streamlined visa processing and post study work rights for a broader pool of overseas students based in NSW,” Mr Stoner said. “Our full response to the Taskforce’s final report will be released soon, but our announcement today is a first step towards making NSW a more attractive international education destination.

“International students will have access to potential discounts of up to 35 per cent on MyMulti passes offering periodic unlimited travel on buses, trains, light rail and ferries in Greater Sydney, the Hunter and the Illawarra. “The discounts allow for potential savings of more than $800 on an annual MyMulti3 pass and more than $450 on an annual MyMulti2. Overseas students can also save more than $200 on a MyMulti3 90 day pass and $133 on a MyMulti2 90 day pass. “The savings can apply to all travel, not simply travel to and from students’ place of study, so this provides a fantastic opportunity for students to get out and explore Sydney and NSW.”

Ms Upton said the Taskforce’s final report identified a range of challenges and opportunities facing the NSW international education sector. “While the market for international students is increasingly competitive, opportunities for growth are enormous with global demand for international higher education forecast to grow from 2.2 million in 2005 to 3.7 million in 2025. China, India, Malaysia and Indonesia are predicted to account for over 60 per cent of this growth,” Ms Upton said.

“The final report of the NSW Government’s International Education and Research Taskforce outlines a range of measures Government and Industry can take to position NSW as a significant global player and Australia’s leading State for international education and research. “The report calls for the NSW Government to ramp up its efforts to lobby for Federal level improvements to the quality of teaching, courses and research. “The quality of the total student experience is also identified as a key target for improvement, with Government asked to consider issues including affordable accommodation and transport, access to part time employment, industry placements while studying, and employment on completion of study.

“The Taskforce also recommends creation of a new agency to provide a one-stop-shop for information for international students and to drive implementation of a range of other recommendations on issues including quality, migration, post study work rights and levels of research funding.”

For more information, please read the attached media release.

September 5, 2012

Australian universities ranked amongst the best in the world

 

Five Australian universities have been ranked amongst the world’s top 100 according to the latest Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU),  released this month.

 

In 2012,

  • The University of Melbourne (57),
  • The Australian National University (64),
  • The University of Queensland (90),
  • The University of Sydney (93) and
  • The University of Western Australia (96)

were listed amongst the world’s best.

 

This year’s rankings indicate the relative strength of the Australia’s university system and reflect the sector’s significant investment in continuous improvement; in 2012, Australia was just one of two countries to increase the number of universities represented in the top 100.

 

Welcoming the news, Chief Executive of Universities Australia, Belinda Robinson, said the country’s improved standings in the 2012 ARWU is apt recognition of the high-quality of Australian research and teaching programs.

 

“This is an outstanding result for Australia and demonstrates the nation’s commitment to having a world class university system providing teaching and research at the highest levels,” said Ms Robinson

 

“Universities’ central role in creating opportunities for all Australians to study in a world class higher education system should be acknowledged and celebrated,” Ms Robinson said.

 

Source: Austrade, 5 September 2012

August 31, 2012

 

While most international students in Australia are full-fee paying students, another option is to apply for a scholarship.

Scholarships are offered by education institutions and a number of other organisations and the Australian Government.  They cover various educational sectors, including

  • vocational education and training,
  • student exchanges,
  • undergraduate and
  • postgraduate study and research.

Usually Australian Government scholarships are not available for English language training specifically in Australia. However, there are several English language training scholarships offered by Australian institutions.

For information on scholarships use Australian Government  Scholarships Database. It provides an accurate and reliable list of all scholarships supplied by Australian-based organisations, institutions and government bodies to international students studying or planning to study in Australia on a student visa.

The Australia Awards aim to promote knowledge, education links and enduring ties between Australia and our neighbours through Australia’s extensive scholarship programs.

The Australia Awards brings the Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) and the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR) scholarships together under the Australia Awards program.

Further information can be found at www.AustraliaAwards.gov.au

There are three programs available under the Australia Awards. They are:

  • Endeavour Awards is the Australian Government’s internationally competitive, merit-based scholarship program providing opportunities for citizens of the Asia-Pacific, Middle East, Europe and the America’s to undertake study, research or professional development in Australia. Further information can be found at: www.deewr.gov.au/EndeavourAwards

 

  • Australian Leadership Awards (ALA) focus on developing leaders who can influence social and economic policy reform and development outcomes in both their own countries and in the Asia-Pacific region. ALAs provide scholarship support for postgraduate studies in Australia and short-term fellowship opportunities in specialised research, study or professional attachments through participating Australian organisations. Further information can be found at: www.ausaid.gov.au/scholar

 

  • Australian Development Scholarships (ADS) aim to contribute to the long-term development needs of Australia’s partner countries to promote good governance, economic growth and human development. ADS provides people with the necessary skills and knowledge to drive change and influence the development outcomes of their own country, through obtaining tertiary qualifications at participating Australian institutions. Further information can be found at: www.ausaid.gov.au/scholar
March 23, 2012

 

The Minister for Immigration and Citizenship, Chris Bowen MP, today announced key changes to the student visa program recommended by the Knight Review will commence from 24 March, as part of the government’s commitment to position Australia as a preferred study destination for international students.

‘International education plays a vital role in a growing economy, educational outcomes and Australia’s diplomatic engagement with other countries, so it’s important that we give it the best possible support,’ Mr Bowen said.

‘From 24 March, we are implementing streamlined visa processing arrangements for prospective students enrolled in Bachelor, Masters or Doctoral degrees at participating universities, making the application process simpler and faster.’

In recognition of these institutions’ track record, university students — regardless of their country of origin — will be treated as though they are lower risk and will need to submit less evidence in support of their visa application, similar to the current assessment level (AL) 1.

‘Universities in Australia have embraced the opportunity to sign up to the arrangements, which are expected to help boost international enrolments for semester two 2012 and beyond,’ Mr Bowen said.

From 26 March, the government will provide more flexible work conditions for all student visa holders, which will also provide more flexibility for their employers.

In recognition of the importance of the higher degree by research sector, the government will also allow postgraduate research (subclass 574) visa holders to work an unlimited amount of hours per week once their course has commenced, which will mean they can engage in employment related to their research.

Other Knight Review changes to be implemented from 24 March include:

Improved access to English language study for schools sector visa applicants and for student guardian visa holders

Removal of the requirement for higher risk schools sector visa applicants to provide evidence of an English language proficiency test.

In line with the Knight Review recommendations, the minister today introduced legislation to Parliament to abolish the automatic visa cancellation process for international students.

The Student Legislation Amendment (Student Visas) Bill will reduce complexity and uncertainty for students and provide for fairer, more efficient monitoring and compliance processes.

 

Thursday, 22 March 2012

February 15, 2012
February 15, 2012


1                     The Minister for Immigration and Citizenship, Chris Bowen MP, today announced the Government will make the visa application process easier for students from 29 countries by reducing assessment levels across a range of student visa subclasses from 24 March.

The changes are in response to the Department of Immigration and Citizenship’s (DIAC) 2011 review of student visa assessment level settings, which recommended that a number of assessment levels be changed. 

“While it was recommended that some assessment levels be increased, I have decided to only implement the reductions in order to best support Australia’s international education sector,” Mr Bowen said.

“Lowering the minimum evidentiary requirement for the grant of a student visa for selected countries and visa subclasses is expected to help around 10,500 prospective students.

“These changes will particularly benefit the postgraduate research sector, English Language Intensive Courses for Overseas Students (ELICOS) and vocational education and training (VET) providers.”

For example, South Koreans studying VET and ELICOS courses and postgraduate research students from China, India and Indonesia will now find it easier to apply for visas.

“The reduction in assessment levels builds on the measures implemented as a result of the Strategic Review of the Student Visa Program, undertaken by the Hon Michael Knight AO, to ensure Australia remains an attractive study option for overseas students,” Mr Bowen said. 

Assessment levels are an important tool in managing the student visa program, as they ensure the efficient delivery of services to a diverse range of students while supporting the integrity of Australia’s immigration program.

Assessment levels align visa requirements to the immigration risk posed by students from every country and in each education sector. They are regularly reviewed and amended to accurately reflect the risk posed by a student cohort.

Those countries and sectors that were recommended to be subject to an increase in assessment levels will be placed on notice and reviewed as part of any future reforms to the risk management framework. 

More information on the reductions to student visa assessment levels can be found at www.immi.gov.au/students/student-visa-assessment-levels.htm

2                     Reduction of Certain Student Visa Assessment Levels

Reductions in Student visa assessment levels for 29 countries for certain Student visa subclasses was announced by the Minister for Immigration and Citizenship on 15 February 2012. These reductions will take effect on 24 March 2012.

These changes will lower the minimum evidentiary requirements needed for the grant of a Student visa for certain countries and education sectors.

The following is a list of countries and Student visa subclasses affected by the assessment level decreases which will take effect on 24 March 2012.

Country of Citizenship

Education Sector

Updated Assessment Levels

Belize

Subclass 572 – VET

AL2

Bhutan

Subclass 574 – Post Grad Research

AL1

Botswana

Subclass 571 – Schools

AL1

Botswana

Subclass 575 – Non–Award

AL1

Bulgaria

Subclass 570 – ELICOS

AL1

Bulgaria

Subclass 572 – VET

AL1

Bulgaria

Subclass 573 – Higher Ed

AL1

Bulgaria

Subclass 575 – Non–Award

AL1

China, Peoples Republic of

Subclass 574 – Post Grad Research

AL1

Ecuador

Subclass 574 – Post Grad Research

AL1

Egypt

Subclass 574 – Post Grad Research

AL1

India

Subclass 574 – Post Grad Research

AL1

Indonesia

Subclass 571 – Schools

AL1

Indonesia

Subclass 574 – Post Grad Research

AL1

Jordan

Subclass 571 – Schools

AL2

Kazakhstan

Subclass 574 – Post Grad Research

AL1

Kazakhstan

Subclass 575 – Non–Award

AL2

Korea, South

Subclass 570 – ELICOS

AL1

Korea, South

Subclass 572 – VET

AL1

Latvia

Subclass 572 – VET

AL1

Lebanon

Subclass 571 – Schools

AL2

Lebanon

Subclass 574 – Post Grad Research

AL1

Lebanon

Subclass 575 – Non–Award

AL3

Maldives

Subclass 570 – ELICOS

AL2

Maldives

Subclass 571 – Schools

AL1

Maldives

Subclass 573 – Higher Ed

AL1

Mauritius

Subclass 571 – Schools

AL1

Mexico

Subclass 572 – VET

AL1

Montenegro, Republic of

Subclass 570 – ELICOS

AL2

Montenegro, Republic of

Subclass 57
2 – VET

AL2

Montenegro, Republic of

Subclass 573 – Higher Ed

AL2

Montenegro, Republic of

Subclass 575 – Non–Award

AL2

Namibia

Subclass 573 – Higher Ed

AL2

Nepal

Subclass 574 – Post Grad Research

AL1

Nicaragua

Subclass 570 – ELICOS

AL2

Nicaragua

Subclass 571 – Schools

AL2

Nicaragua

Subclass 572 – VET

AL2

Nicaragua

Subclass 575 – Non–Award

AL2

Philippines

Subclass 571 – Schools

AL1

Reunion

Subclass 572 – VET

AL1

Reunion

Subclass 573 – Higher Ed

AL1

Seychelles

Subclass 571 – Schools

AL1

Seychelles

Subclass 572 – VET

AL1

Seychelles

Subclass 575 – Non–Award

AL1

Suriname

Subclass 573 – Higher Ed

AL2

Suriname

Subclass 575 – Non–Award

AL2

Tanzania

Subclass 571 – Schools

AL2

Tanzania

Subclass 574 – Post Grad Research

AL1

Turkey

Subclass 571 – Schools

AL2

Turkey

Subclass 572 – VET

AL2

Ukraine

Subclass 570 – ELICOS

AL2

Ukraine

Subclass 571 – Schools

AL2

Ukraine

Subclass 573 – Higher Ed

AL2

Ukraine

Subclass 574 – Post Grad Research

AL1

Ukraine

Subclass 575 – Non–Award

AL2

Venezuela

Subclass 572 – VET

AL1

3                     Frequently asked Questions

4 Q: I am an international student studying in Australia. Do these changes affect me?

A: These changes will only affect new Student visa applications made on or after 24 March 2012.

5 Q: What does a reduction of assessment levels mean to Student visa applicants?

A: Students affected by the changes will be required to provide less documentary evidence to support their claims for the grant of a Student visa. These may include evidence of English language proficiency, financial capacity and academic qualifications.

6 Q: Where can I find out more information about assessment levels?

A: Further information on assessment levels including a full list of current assessment levels is available on the department’s website.
See: Student Visa Assessment Levels

 

September 29, 2011

 

September 2011

International Education Agency-Australia, one of the largest education agent of Australia has welcomed the Government’s response to the Knight review into the student visa program, in particular steps to remove barriers for genuine higher education students to study in Australia.

The Australian federal government commissioned the Knight Review into the student visa program in Dec 2010 to investigate ways to make Australia more competitive whilst maintaining the integrity of the migration system and the quality of its education system.

This followed a steady downturn of international students choosing to study in Australia after changes to visa and migration policy in early 2010.

In June Michael Knight handed his report to the Government and on 22 September the Government, Senator Evans, Minister for Education, and Minister Bowen, Minister for Immigration and Citizenship, released the report with the statement that they were accepting all 41 of Knight’s recommendations.

A number of significant changes are outlined below.

Changes to student visa eligibility and processing:

  • That all higher education students applying to study a bachelor degree or higher at a university or a packaged course, regardless of country of origin, will be treated as a student from an AL1 country. This means a change to a declaration of proof of funds and in many countries the ability to apply via the eVisa system which should significantly reduce the time taken to secure a student visa. English language courses and other preparatory course will also be included in this streamlined process.
  • Allowing English language students to apply for a visa without first meeting minimum English language skills requirements; and
  • The policy of Pre¬Visa Assessment will be discontinued.
  • That student visas be allowed to be granted in advance of four months before the commencement of the relevant course. Where necessary visas should specify a date before which the holder cannot enter Australia.

Changes to student work rights:

  • An enhanced post study work visa regime for international university graduates, particularly withdrawing skills assessment and the requirement to work in any particular occupation.
  • In addition the term of the post study work visa will increase from 18 to 24 months for undergraduates degrees, up to three years for Masters and four years for PhD.
  • That student work entitlements be measured as 40 hours per fortnight instead of 20 hours per week

Changes to be made regarding Agents:

  • That the necessary legislative changes be made to require the name of any agent involved to be entered into the student’s data into PRISMS.
  • That DEEWR take steps to encourage providers to voluntarily enter agent data into PRISMS in the interim before the ESOS Act is changed to make this mandatory.
  • That DIAC upgrade its liaison at overseas posts with migration and education agents in relation to the student visa program, including regular meetings to keep agents abreast of any changes in rules and procedures.

Changes to visa compliance and enforcement:

  • The mandatory cancellation requirement for unsatisfactory attendance, unsatisfactory progress and working in excess of the hours allowed should be removed, giving DIAC officers the discretion to determine cancellation in particular cases on their merits.
  • DIAC should concentrate its compliance and integrity resources in relation to student visas on the highest risk areas.
  • Automatic cancellation of student visas should be abolished and replaced by a system in which information conveyed by SCVs is used as an input into a more targeted and strategic analysis of non‐compliance.

The full list of 41 recommendations has been provided below.

One of the most significant changes is that the onus on judging student visa eligibility has been passed to universities and their partners, who will need to ensure that standards are maintained otherwise the Department of Immigration and Citizenship (DIAC) reserves the right to strip institutions of their ability to streamline visa processing.

Other education providers such as Vocation Education institutions have not yet been granted the ability to streamline their visa processing like the universities but the government has highlighted plans to widen this option based on a provider risk assessment.

In accepting Knight’s recommendations the Australian government has also indicated that it plans to review the current Assessment Level system and take further steps to improve the current risk management framework.

The implementation timeframe for many of these changes is not yet established but the government has committed to having most changes operational by the commencement of the second semester in 2012.

 

Recommendations

Recommendation 1

That a new element be introduced into the eligibility criteria for a student visa. That new criterion will be to assess whether the applicant is a genuine temporary entrant. This new criterion should be the first to be considered in assessing any application for a student visa.

Recommendation 2

A successful applicant must be both a genuine temporary entrant and a genuine student.

Recommendation 3 – streamlined visa processing for universities

3.1 That all students in the categories set out below, irrespective of their country of origin

– but subject to the provisions in 3.5, 3.6 and 3.7 should be treated as though they are all AL1.

 

3.2 This treatment should apply to the following university student applicants:

  • Bachelor Degree;
  • 2 plus 2 (or 3 plus 1) arrangements with partner universities;
  • Masters Degree by Coursework.

3.3 The special treatment should not apply to:

  • short courses;
  • Associate Degree;
  • Graduate diploma;
  • Graduate certificate;
  • Diploma and Advanced Diploma;
  • non‐award courses (except as provided for in Recommendation 18);
  • the non‐university courses at the six universities which are dual sector (VET and university).

3.4 The benefits should also apply to courses which are explicitly packaged with an eligible university course at the time when the offer of university enrolment is made. This might include English language (ELICOS) and/or foundation or pathway courses in circumstances where non compliance by the student at any part of the package would be regarded as non‐compliance with the university enrolment.

3.5 The government should continue to require appropriate health checks, health insurance, character (predominantly criminal record/connections) and security checks.

3.6 The underlying DIAC powers in regard to every individual student application should continue to exist.

3.7 The government should also reserve the right to exclude certain high risk groups from the streamlined approach for university applicants. For example, the government might want to carefully assess all applicants from a persecuted minority group in a particular country. Applicants from such a group might have a huge incentive to apply for protection visas as soon as they reach Australia. The Australian Government may or may not wish to take such people on humanitarian grounds but that should be a separate decision and should not get mixed up with the process of granting visas for university students.

Recommendation 4 Post Study Work Rights

4.1 All graduates of an Australian university Bachelor degree, who have spent at least two academic years studying that degree in Australia, and who have complied with their visa conditions, should receive two years work rights.

4.2 All graduates of an Australian university Mast
ers by Coursework degree, who have studied that degree in Australia, and who have complied with their visa conditions, should receive two years work rights on successful completion of their course.

4.3 This should apply irrespective of the nature of the course (for example whether it be Arts or Engineering) and not be tied to working in any particular occupation.

4.4 The mechanism for taking up these work rights should be administratively very simple with the following components:

  • the university must notify that the course has been successfully completed. (This will be earlier than the formal graduation which could be many months after the course has been completed);
  • DIAC should not undertake any detailed, time consuming, assessment of the applicant;
  • the scheme must be one which can be marketed by the universities to prospective students as almost guaranteeing post study work rights.

Recommendation 5

That all Higher Degree by Research (HDR) students – visa subclass 574 ‐be treated as though they are all AL1 applicants.

Recommendation 6

That where any English language or other preparatory course is required by the Higher Degree by Research provider then the whole package still be treated as AL1.

Recommendation 7

That all Higher Degree by Research students be given unlimited work rights.

Recommendation 8

Masters by Research graduates should receive three years post‐study work rights and PhD graduates four years.

Recommendation 9

That the visa arrangements for Higher Degree by Research students be such that an extension for up to six months after submission of their thesis is available if needed during the interactive marking process.

Recommendation 10

That, provided the integrity measures relating to the revised criteria for a student visa are implemented (as set out in Recommendation 1), the threshold English language test requirements for stand alone ELICOS students be removed.

Recommendation 11

That the English language requirements for school students in AL4 be the same as those applying for AL1 through to AL3 and the associated waiver scheme abolished.

Recommendation 12

That the maximum period of time a school student visa holder can study English be 50 weeks across all ALs.

Recommendation 13

That the current restrictions on student guardians of a maximum of three months of study be maintained but unlimited part‐time study rights for ELICOS study only be allowed.

Recommendation 14

That pre‐paid homestay fees be included in financial assessments on the same basis as pre‐paid boarding fees.

Recommendation 15

That as a matter of some urgency AusAID, DIAC, DOHA and other relevant Australian government agencies develop an integrated policy in relation to the award of scholarships and how visa arrangements for awardees are to be managed. In particular they should address the situation of potential awardees who have a disability or HIV.

Recommendation 16

That PhD students entering under the subclass 576 visa have access to the same extension provisions recommended for Higher Degree by Research students in Recommendation 9, provided AusAID is prepared to fund their extended period.

Recommendation 17

That DIAC and DEEWR meet with State education authorities to work out what can be done to avoid the situation where a visa for a child dependent cannot be granted until proof of enrolment is present and state education authorities will not grant such proof until proof of visa grant is made. Any agreed remedy should apply across all student visa subclasses.

Recommendation 18

That students coming for semester or year¬long non‐award courses at an Australian university as part of their home universities degree and/or as part of an agreed student exchange between universities be given access to streamlined processing as outlined in Recommendation 3.

Recommendation 19

That DIAC undertake specific research targeted at integrity and compliance issues into student visa outcomes, including both primary and secondary applicants, to inform policy development.

Recommendation 20

That DIAC be appropriately funded to further develop research capability across the program.

Recommendation 21

That DIAC, to the extent permitted by legislation, co‐operate with its counterparts across all levels of government to facilitate information sharing, to inform evidence based decision making.

Recommendation 22

In the event that the research over the next 12 months reveals systemic abuse of dependant (secondary applicant) visas, that the government seriously consider mirroring the recent UK policy and restrict dependant visas to Masters and above courses unless the primary applicant is sponsored by a government.

Recommendation 23

Current arrangements whereby SCVs automatically become NCNs should cease. SCV information should continue to be conveyed to DIAC who should use it as an input into a more targeted and strategic analysis of non‐compliance.

Recommendation 24

Automatic cancellation of student visas should be abolished and replaced by a system in which information conveyed by SCVs is used as an input into a more targeted and strategic analysis of non‐compliance.

Recommendation 25

The mandatory cancellation requirement for unsatisfactory attendance, unsatisfactory progress and working in excess of the hours allowed should be removed, giving DIAC officers the discretion to determine cancellation in particular cases on their merits.

 

Recommendation 26

DIAC should concentrate its compliance and integrity resources in relation to student visas on the highest risk areas.

Recommendation 27

DIAC should not only respond to information generated by PRISMS but also be proactive in detecting the sorts of breaches (for example sham marriages and exceeding permissible work hours) which are not reported in PRISMS.

Recommendation 28

That student work entitlements be measured as 40 hours per fortnight instead of 20 hours per week

Recommendation 29

That the necessary legislative changes be made to require the name of any agent involved to be entered into the student’s data into PRISMS.

Recommendation 30

That DEEWR take steps to encourage providers to voluntarily enter agent data into PRISMS in the interim before the ESOS Act is changed to make this mandatory.

Recommendation 31

That DEEWR and DIAC establish a single student identifier to track international students through their studies in Australia.

Recommendation 32

That DIAC undertake a review of the AL framework, with a mind to either abolishing the system entirely or modifying the framework to make it relevant to current and future challenges facing the student visa program. This review should be managed by DIAC but should include reference to an external panel or reference group.

Recommendation 33

That DIAC upgrade its liaison at overseas posts with migration and education agents in relation to the student visa program, including regular meetings to keep agents abreast of any changes in rules and procedures.

Recommendation 34

That Austrade be asked to prepare a more detailed outlook document that provides effective business planning intelligence demonstrating the opportunities, for offshore provision of vo
cational education.

Recommendation 35

That the highest quality Australian VET providers including TAFEs, be encouraged to explore offshore market opportunities.

Recommendation 36

That the Australian Government, through programs such as the Export Market Development Grants Scheme and other forms of assistance, support high quality Australian vocational education providers in expanding their offshore training services.

Recommendation 37

That DIAC constitute an Education Visa Advisory Group as a primary means of regular two way communication between stakeholders in the international education sector and DIAC.

Recommendation 38

That the policy regarding Pre‐Visa Assessment (PVA) be discontinued.

Recommendation 39

That student visas be allowed to be granted in advance of four months before the commencement of the relevant course. Where necessary visas should specify a date before which the holder cannot enter Australia.

Recommendation 40

That DIAC regularly reviews the current living cost amount, and based on the CPI or other measure amend the amount, as required.

Recommendation 41

That DIAC review the exclusion criteria and policy which relate to student visa non‐compliance.

 

May 27, 2011

 

The Endeavour Awards is the Australian Government’s internationally competitive, merit-based scholarship program providing opportunities for citizens of the Asia-Pacific, the Middle East, Europe and the Americas to undertake study, research and professional development in Australia. Awards are also available for Australians to undertake study research and professional development abroad.

 

The Endeavour Awards aim to:

  • Develop ongoing educational, research and professional linkages between individuals, organisations and countries;
  • Provide opportunities for high achieving individuals to increase their skills and enhance their global awareness;
  • Contribute to Australia’s position as a high quality education and training provider, and leader in research and innovation; and
  • Increase the productivity of Australians through an international study, research or professional development experience.

 

The Endeavour Awards are a part of the Australia Awards initiative, which brings together, under a single recognisable brand, the Endeavour Awards run by the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations’ (DEEWR) and the Development Awards offered by AusAID. For further information visit the Australia Awards website at www.AustraliaAwards.gov.au.

 

Award Summary

Award Name

Maximum value

Maximum duration

Study Level

Endeavour Postgraduate Award (incoming only)

A$228,500

Up to 2 years for a Masters; up to 4 years for a PhD

Postgraduate study/research for an Australian Masters degree or PhD

Endeavour Research Fellowships (including Research Fellowships for Indigenous Australians & Endeavour Australia Cheung Kong Research Fellowships)

A$23,500

4 – 6 months

Research towards a Masters degree or PhD in home country; or postdoctoral research

Endeavour Vocational Education and Training (VET) Award (incoming only)

A$119,500

1 – 2.5 years

Diploma, Advanced Diploma, Associate Degree

Endeavour Executive Award

A$18,500

1 – 4 months

Professional development

Prime Minister’s Australia Asia Award (Incoming Postgraduate)

A$263,500

Up to 4 years

+ up to 1 year optional internship

PhD by research;

Prime Minister’s Australia Asia Award Outgoing Postgraduate

A$63,500

Up to 2 years

PhD by research;

Ma by coursework;

Ma by research;

Prime Minister’s Australia Asia Award Outgoing Undergraduate

A$53,500

Up to 2 years

Bachelor Degree;

Honours

October 30, 2009
October 30, 2009
  1. Monash University

Monash University

Motto

Ancora imparo (“I am still learning”)

Established

1958

Type

Public

Endowment

$1.178 billion

Chancellor

Dr Alan Finkel AM

Vice-Chancellor

Professor Edward Byrne,AO[1]

Faculty

6,000 [2]

Undergraduates

39,000

Postgraduates

16,000

Location

ClaytonVictoria, Australia

Campus

Urban

Affiliations

Group of EightASAIHL

Website

www.monash.edu.au/

A panorama view of Robert Menzies Building in Clayton Campus

Robert Menzies Building at the Clayton Campus

Monash University is a public university based in Melbourne, Australia. It is Australia’s largest university with about 55,000 students.

The University has a total of eight campuses: six in Victoria, Australia (ClaytonCaulfieldBerwickPeninsula,Parkville and Gippsland), one in Malaysia and one in South Africa.[3] The University also has a research and teaching centre in PratoItaly[4] and a graduate research school in MumbaiIndia.[5]

Monash University is a member of the prestigious “Group of Eight“, a group composed of some of the most research-intensive universities in Australia. It was recently ranked by The Times Higher Education-QS World University Rankings at number 45 of the world’s top 200 universities for 2009. It is one of only three post World War II universities in the world’s top 50.[6] With 11 universities in Victoria,[7] Monash attracts 33% of the top 5% of students from Victorian schools.[8][9] It has the largest number of first and total preferences from school leavers in Victoria seeking university places.[10]

Monash is home to a range of major research facilities, including the Australian Synchrotron, the Monash Science Technology Research and Innovation Precinct (STRIP), the Australian Stem Cell Centre, 100 research centres[11] and 17 co-operative research centres.

The university is named after the prominent Australian general Sir John Monash. One of his most well known statements is inscribed along a walkway between the Robert Blackwood Hall and Performing Arts Centre at the Clayton campus: Adopt as your fundamental creed that you will equip yourself for life, not solely for your own benefit, but for the benefit of the whole community.

The University’s motto is Ancora imparo (Italian), meaning ‘I am still learning’,[12] a saying attributed toMichelangelo.

  1. History

Main article: History of Monash University

One of the lakes at the University’s foundation campus, Clayton

  1. 4 Early history

Monash University is a commissioned Victorian university. It was established by an Act of the State Parliament of Victoria in 1958 as a result of the Murray Report which was commissioned in 1957 by the then Prime Minister Sir Robert Menzies to establish the second university in the state of Victoria. The university was named after the prominent Australian general Sir John Monash. This was the first time in Australia that a university had been named after a person, rather than a city or state.[13]

The original campus was in the south-eastern Melbourne suburb of Clayton (falling in what is now the City of Monash). The first University Council, led by Monash’s first Chancellor Sir Robert Blackwood, selected SirLouis Matheson, to be the first Vice-Chancellor of Monash University, a position he held until 1976. The University was granted an expansive site of 100 hectares of open land in Clayton.[14]

From its first intake of 347 students at Clayton on 13 March 1961, the university grew rapidly in size and student numbers so that by 1967, it had enrolled more than 21,000 students since its establishment.[citation needed] In its early years, it offered undergraduate and postgraduate degrees in engineering, medicine, science, arts, economics and politics, education and law. It was a major provider for international student places under the Colombo Plan, which saw the first Asian students enter the Australian education system.

In its early years of teaching, research and administration, Monash had the advantage of no entrenched traditional practices. This enabled it to adopt modern approaches without resistance from those who preferred the status quo. A modern administrative structure was set up, Australia’s first research centres and scholarships devoted to Indigenous Australians were established, and, thanks to Monash’s entirely new facilities, students in wheelchairs were able to enroll.[citation needed]

  1. 5 1970s onwards

From the mid-1960s to the early 1970s, Monash became the centre of student radicalism in Australia.[15][16] It was the site of many mass student demonstrations, particularly concerning Australia’s role in Vietnam War and conscription.[17] By the late 1960s, several student organisations, some of which were influenced by or supporters of communism, turned their focus to Vietnam, with numerous blockades and sit-ins.[18]

In the late 1970s and 1980s, Monash’s most publicised research came through its pioneering of in-vitro fertilisation (IVF). Led by Professors Carl Wood andAlan Trounson, the Monash IVF Program achieved the world’s first clinical IVF pregnancy in 1973.[19] In 1980, they delivered the first IVF baby in Australia.[20] This eventually became a massive source of revenue for the University at a time when university funding in Australia was beginning to slow down.

In the late 1980s, the Dawkins Reforms changed the landscape of higher education in Australia. Under the leadership of Vice-Chancellor Mal Logan, Monash transformed dramatically. In 1988, Monash University had only one campus, Clayton, with around 15, 000 students.[21] Just over a decade later, it had 8 campuses (including 2 overseas), a European research and teaching centre, and more than 50,000 stude
nts, making it the largest and most internationalised Australian university.[22]

  1. 6 Expansion in the 1990s

The expansion began in 1990, with a series of mergers between Monash, the Chisholm Institute of Technology, the Gippsland Institute of Advanced Education. In 1991 a merger with the Victorian College of Pharmacy created a new faculty of the University. Monash University’s expansion continued in 1994, with the establishment of the Berwick campus.

In 1998, the University opened the Malaysia campus, its first overseas campus and the first foreign university in Malaysia. In 2001, Monash South Africa opened its doors in Johannesburg, making Monash the first foreign university in South Africa. The same year, the University secured an 18th Century Tuscan Palace to open a research and teaching centre in Prato, Italy.

At the same time, Australian universities faced unprecedented demand for international student places, which Monash met on a larger scale than most, to the point that today around 30% of its students are from outside Australia.[23] Today, Monash students come from over 100 different countries, and speak over 90 different languages. The increase in international students, combined with its expansion, meant that Monash’s income skyrocketed throughout the 1990s, and it is now one of Australia’s top 200 exporters.[24]

  1. 7 2000 onwards

In recent years, the University has been prominent in medical research. A highlight of this came in 2000, when Professor Alan Trounson led the team of scientists which first announced to the world that nerve stem cells could be derived from embryonic stem cells, a discovery which led to a dramatic increase in interest in the potential of stem cells.[25][26] It has also led to Monash being ranked in the top 20 universities in the world for biomedicine.[27]

On October 21, 2002 Huan Yun “Allen” Xiang shot two people dead and injured five others on the Clayton campus.

For more details on this topic, see Monash University shooting.

On 30 May 2008, Monash University celebrated its 50th Anniversary.

The current Vice-Chancellor and President of Monash University is Professor Edward Byrne AO (since July 2009).

  1. Campuses
  2. 9 Clayton campus

Howitt Hall at the Clayton campus in Victoria, Australia

The Clayton campus covers an area over 1.1 km² and is the largest of the Monash campuses. Clayton is the flagship campus for Monash, demanding higher ENTER scores than all the other campuses, with the exception of Parkville. Clayton is home to the faculties of Arts, Business & Economics, Education, Engineering, IT, Law, Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences and Science. The Clayton campus has its own suburb and postcode (3800).

In 2001, the State Government of Victoria decided to build the first Australian synchrotron adjoining the campus. The Australian Synchrotron opened in July 2007 and creates beam light to make it capable to view matter at the molecular level. Monash University contributed $5M towards the $220M cost of the synchrotron as a member of the funding partnership for the initial suite of beamlines.[28]

The campus is also home to a number of halls of residence, colleges and other on-campus accommodation that house several thousand students. Six halls of residence are located at theClayton campus in Clayton, Victoria. There is an additional private residential college affiliated with the University.

  • Howitt Hall is the tallest Monash residential building, standing 12 stories high, with a good view of the other halls and the university. Howitt Hall is the third oldest hall, and was opened in September 1966. The hall is named after Alfred Howitt, a scholar and prominent figure in early Gippsland.
  • Farrer Hall is divided into two buildings, Commons and Lords, with an annex to Commons called Chastity which is located above the common room. The Hall has more focus on floors, with kitchens, laundries and common rooms shared across them.
  • Richardson Hall (Richo) is the newest of the Halls of Residence at Monash University. Richardson is home to 190 residents. Richardson ‘has’ been known as the ‘International hall’ to residents of other halls, due to the high numbers of international students residing in Richardson.
  • Deakin Hall was the first residence hall established at Monash University in Australia, in September, 1962. [1] The residence hall was named afterAlfred Deakin, Prime Minister from 1903-1910 and father of the Australian Constitution.
  • Roberts Hall is named after Tom Roberts, an Australian artist who was affectionately known as ‘the bulldog’. The mascot of Roberts Hall is a bulldog in recognition of this.
  • The South East Flats is located at the south-eastern corner of the university’s Clayton campus. It is made up of two block of flats|blocks of flats, and the flat sizes range from 2 bedrooms to 5 bedrooms. There are 30 flats in total, designed to accommo
    date 130 students.

The campus is also adjacent to Mannix College, a residential college affiliated with Monash University.[29]

  • Mannix College is located near the south-western corner of the university’s Clayton campus, adjacent to the Monash Clayton bus interchange. It is made up of two wings of dormitories, Hoevers and Malarkey, each with three levels and approximately 40 students per floor, giving a total student residence of approximately 240. Mannix is the only on-campus residence to provide fully catered board and lodging.
  1. 10 Caulfield campus

H Building on the Caulfield campus in Victoria, Australia

The Caulfield campus is Monash University’s second largest campus. Its multifaceted nature is reflected in the range of programs it offers through the faculties of Arts, Art & Design, Business & Economics, Information Technology and Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences. A major building program has been announced, to expand teaching facilities, provide student accommodation and redevelop the shopping centre. The Law faculty for Monash University will relocate to the Caulfield campus by the end of 2011.[30]

  1. 11 Other Australian campuses

One of Monash’s newest, Berwick campus was built on the old Casey airfield in the south-eastern growth corridor of Victoria, Australia. The town of Berwick has experienced an influx of people and development in recent times, which includes the new campus of Monash University. With a presence in the area since 1994, the first Monash Berwick campus building was completed in 1996 and the third building in March 2004. It is situated on a 55-hectare site in the City of Casey, one of the three fastest growing municipalities in Australia

The Gippsland campus is home to 2,000 on-campus students, 5,000 off-campus students and nearly 400 staff. The campus sits in the Latrobe Valleytown of Churchill, 142 km east of Melbourne on 63 hectares of landscaped grounds. It is the only non-metropolitan campus of Monash University. The campus offers many undergraduate degrees, and attracts many students from the Latrobe Valley, East and West Gippsland. The Gippsland Medical School, offering postgraduate entry Bachelor of Medicine / Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) courses was officially opened by the Federal Minister for Health and Ageing,Nicola Roxon in June 2008, providing students with a unique opportunity to learn medicine in a rural setting working with rural practitioners.[31]

The Parkville campus is situated in the Melbourne suburb of Parkville, around 2 km north of the Melbourne CBD on Royal Parade. The campus is the home of the Faculty of Pharmacy and Phamaceutical Sciences. The faculty has a reputation for innovation[citation needed], particularly in the areas of formulation science and medicinal chemistry and offers the Bachelor of Pharmacy and Bachelor of Pharmaceutical Science undergraduate degrees, the latter replacing the Bachelor of Formulation Science in 2007 and the Bachelor of Medicinal Chemistry in 2008. Double degrees are also offered including the Bachelor of Pharmacy/Commerce with the Business and Economics faculty at Clayton, and also the Bachelor of Engineering/Pharmaceutical Science with the Engineering faculty. It also offers postgraduate degrees.

The Peninsula campus has a teaching and research focus on health and wellbeing, and is a hub of undergraduate and postgraduates studies in Nursing, Health Science, Physiotherapy and Psychology – and particularly in Emergency Health (Paramedic) courses.

The campus is located in the bayside suburb of Frankston on the edge of Melbourne. Peninsula campus also offers a range of courses including those from its historic roots with early childhood and primary education (during the 1960s and 1970’s the campus was the State Teacher’s College), and Business & Economics (since the merger of the State Teacher’s College with the Caulfield Institute of Technology to create the Chisholm Institute of Technology in 1982). The campus was also home to the Peninsula School of Information Technology, which in 2006 was wound back with Information Technology units previously offered being relocated to the Caulfield campus.

  1. 12 Overseas campuses

The Monash University Sunway campus in Malaysia opened in 1998 in Bandar Sunway, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The Sunway campus offers various undergraduate degrees through its faculties of Medicine and Health Sciences, Engineering, Information Technology, Business, and Arts and Sciences. It is currently home to almost 4,000 students. The new purpose-built campus opened in 2007, providing a high-tech home for Monash in Malaysia. In addition to a wide range of undergraduate degrees, the campus also offers both postgraduate Masters and PhD programs. Its degrees in Medicine and Surgery are the first medical degrees outside Australia and New Zealand to be accredited by the Australian Medical Council.

Monash South Africa is situated on the western outskirts of Johannesburg, and opened its doors in 2001. The campus is expanding, with student numbers growing at 35% per year and expected to be 2,400 in 2008.[citation needed] A new learning commons opened in 2007 and in early 2008, new housing will mean the campus will be able to provide secure on-campus accommodation for 1,000 students. The campus offers undergraduate courses from the faculties of business and economics, arts and IT.

The Monash University Prato Centre is located in the 18th Century Palace, Palazzo Vaj, in the historic centre of Prato, a city near Florence in Italy. Primarily, it hosts students from Monash’s other campuses for semesters in Law, Art and Design, History, Music, as well as various international conferences. The Department of Business Law and Taxation, in the Faculty of Business and Economics also runs subjects in Prato. It was officially opened in 2001 as part of the University’s vigorous internationalisation policy. It is now the largest Australian academic institution of its kind in Europe.[citation needed]

The IITB-Monash Research Academy opened in 2008 and is situated in MumbaiIndia.[32] It is a partnership between Monash and the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay. It aims to carry out high impact research in engineering and sciences, particularly clean energy, biotechnology and nanotechnology. Students undertake their research in both India and Australia, with supervisors from both Monash and IITB. Upon graduating, they receive a dual PhD from the two institutions.[33] In the month following its official opening, 36 joint projects had commenced, with a further several hundred planned. Construction of a new $5m facility began in November 2008.[34]

  1. 13 Monash College

As a wholly-owned subsidiary of Monash University, Monash College is an educational institute providing students with an alternative point of entry to Monash University. The institution offers pathway studies for students who endeavor to undertake studies at one of Monash University’s many campuses. Monash College’s specialised undergraduate diplomas (Diploma Part 2 is equivalent to first-year university) provide an alternative entry point into more than 50 Monash University bachelor degrees, taught intensively in smaller classes and an environment overall similar to that offered by the university.

Monash College offers programs in several countries throughout the world, with colleges located in Australia (Melbourne), China (Guangzhou), Indonesia (Jakarta), Singapore and Sri Lanka (Colombo).

  1. 14 Monash University English Language Centre

As a wholly-owned subsidiary of Monash University, Monash University English Language Centre (MUELC) is an educational organisation providing students with an alternative pathway to Monash College and Monash University courses.

  1. Faculties

Monash is divided into 10 faculties. These incorporate the University’s major departments of teaching and research centres.

Stand-alone, interdisciplinary research centres, which are not located within one faculty, include:

  1. Rankings

The following publications ranked universities worldwide. Monash University ranked:

Publications

Ave.

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

Times Higher Education Supplement[35]

39.8

33

33

38

43

47

45

Shanghai Jiao Tong University[36]

152-200

202-300

203-300

201-300

201-300

201-302

Global University Ranking[37]

74-77

Newsweek[38]

73

Economist Intelligence Unit‘s MBA rank[39]

46

49

43

47

Webometrics:[40]

124

144

104

111 (Jan.), 137 (Jul.)

Research produced by the Melbourne Institute in 2006 ranked Australian universities across seven main discipline areas: Arts and Humanities, Business and Economics, Education, Engineering, Law, Medicine, and Science.

For each discipline, Monash University was ranked:[41]

Discipline

R1*

No.

R2*

No.

Arts and Humanities

4

38

4

35

Business and Economics

5

39

4

34

Education

2

35

3

32

Engineering

4

28

5

28

Law

5

29

5

28

Medicine

3

14

4

13

Science

6

38

8

31

* R1 refers to Australian and overseas Academics’ rankings in tables 3.1 -3.7 of the report. R2 refers to the Articles and Research rankings in tables 5.1 – 5.7 of the report. No. refers to the number of institutions in the table against which Monash is compared.

Other rankings[42]:

  • The Monash Clayton campus was ranked number 1 in Australia for student experience by the National Union of Students of Australia in 2007[43]
  • In life sciences and biomedicine, Monash was ranked 25th best in the world by Times Higher Education in 2009
  • In social sciences, it was ranked 26th best in the world by Times Higher Education in 2009[44]
  • In the employer review category, in which employers rate the quality of a university’s graduates, Times Higher Education ranked Monash 15th best in the world in 2008.[45]
  • In the international students category, Times Higher Education ranked Monash 17th best in the world in 2008.[46]
  • The Monash MBA was ranked number 2 in the world by the Economist Intelligence Unit in the category of “personal development and educational experience”[47]
  • The Monash Faculty of Business and Economics School was ranked the best business school in Australia by Webometrics in 2009.[48]
  1. Notable alumni and faculty

Main article: List of Monash University people

Monash has a long list of alumni who have become prominent in a wide range of areas. 1100 Monash graduates (or 8.33% of the total) are listed among the 13,200 biographies of Australia’s most notable individuals in the 2008 edition of Who’s Who in Australia.

Monash graduates who are currently leaders in their fields include the Governor of Victoria, the Chief Justice of Victoria, the Treasurer of Victoria, the Vice President of Indonesia, the Australian Cardinal of the Catholic Church, the Australian Minister for Trade, the Lord Mayor of Melbourne, the Chief Judge of theCounty Court of Victoria, the Chief Magistrate of Victoria, the Coroner of Victoria, the Chief Justice of the Family Court of Australia, the Chief Justice ofNorfolk Island, two of the past three Australians of the Year, several Australian Living Treasures, the Chairman of the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC), the Chairman of the Singapore Economic Development Board, the Chairman of the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission(ACCC), numerous Government Ministers throughout Australia and overseas, Ambassadors to the United Nations, prominent entrepreneurseconomists,public servantsdiplomatsfilm producers (including this year’s only Australian winner of an Academy Award), artists (including winners of the Dobell Prize),actorsplaywrights (including winners of AWGIE Awards), novelists (including winners of the Booker Prize and the Miles Franklin Award), journalists,musicians (including winners of ARIA Awards and the Grand Prix du Disque), mayorsphilanthropistsscientistssurgeons and sportspeople (includingOlympic Games Gold medallists).

  1. Libraries, Museums and Galleries
  2. 19 Monash University Library

Monash University Library is one of Australia’s leading academic libraries, with a long-standing reputation for technological innovation and excellence in customer service. Currently it operates several libraries in all of its campuses, spanning over 3 continents. Monash University Library has just under 3 million items.

  1. 20 Rare Books Collection

Located at the Sir Louis Matheson Library on the Clayton Campus, the Rare Books Collection consists of over 100,000 items, unique due to their age, uniqueness or physical beauty, which can be accessed by Monash staff and students. The collection was started in 1961 when the University Librarian purchased original manuscripts by Jonathan Swift and some of his contemporaries. The Collection now consists of a range of items including photography, children’s books, 15th-17th century English and French literature, original manuscripts and pamphlets. A variety of exhibitions are hosted throughout the year in the Rare Books area.[49]

  1. 21 Monash University Museum of Art

The Monash University Museum of Art (MUMA) was founded in 1961 and is located in a large building on the University’s Clayton Campus. The establishment of the Museum reflected a desire by the University’s founders for students to obtain a broad education, including an appreciation and understanding of the arts. Its collection has now grown to over 1500 works,[50] including a variety of items from artists such as Arthur BoydWilliam Dobell,Sidney NolanHoward ArkleyTracey MoffattJohn PercevalFred Williams and Bill Henson. While the gallery’s focus is on Australian art, it houses a number of international works and exhibitions. It hosts regular exhibitions which are open to Monash students and staff, as well as the general public.[51] The current Curator of the Museum is Geraldine Barlow. In 2009, the University announced that the Museum would be moving to a new facility at the Caulfield Campus, reflecting Caulfield’s role as the University’s home of visual arts.[52]

  1. 22 Switchback Gallery

The Switchback Gallery was opened in 1995 in the landscaped gardens of the University’s Gippsland Campus, and has become a cultural focal point for the region. It hosts a diverse range of exhibitions each year, from work by Monash students, to displays by international artists.[53]

  1. 23 Monash Faculty of Art and Design Gallery

The Art and Design Faculty houses its own collection of artwork. It is located at the University’s Caulfield campus. Its collection includes a wide range of media including painting, tapestry, printmedia, ce
ramics, jewellery, photomedia, industrial design, digital media and installation. In addition to being a public gallery, it runs a Visiting Artists program which attracts artists from around the world to spend a year at the gallery.[54]

  1. Sport

Sport at Monash University is overseen by Monash Sport, a department of the University which employs over 200 staff.[55] Currently, there are 47 sporting clubs at the University.[56]

Each campus has a range of sporting facilities used by students and staff, including football, cricket, hockey, soccer, rugby and baseball fields; tennis, squash and badminton courts; gyms and swimming pools. The University also has an alpine lodge at Mt Buller.

Monash’s sporting teams compete in a range of local and national competitions. Monash sends the largest number of students of any Australian university to the Australian University Games, in which it was Overall Champion in 2008 and 2009.[57]

  1. Vice-Chancellors & Chancellors

The Vice-Chancellor is the chief executive of the University, who is head of Monash’s day-to-day activities. The Vice-Chancellor is also the University President. In North America and parts of Europe, the equivalent role is the President or Principal.

The Chancellor is chair of the University Council and provides advice to the Vice-Chancellor, but serves primarily as the ceremonial figurehead.

  1. 26 Vice-Chancellors
  1. 27 Chancellors
  1. Colleges and Halls of Residence

Monash Residential Services (MRS) is responsible for co-ordinating the operation of on-campus halls of residence. MRS manages a variety of facilities at all five Australian campuses and South Africa.

The following residences are based at the Clayton Campus:

List of colleges

College

Affiliation

Howitt Hall

1966-

Farrer Hall

1965-

Richardson Hall

1972-

Deakin Hall

1961-

Roberts Hall

1971-

Normanby House

1960s-

Mannix College

1969-

South East Flats

Facilities are diverse and vary in services offered. Information on residential services at Monash University, including on-campus (MRS managed) and off-campus, can be found at http://www.mrs.monash.edu.au/.

  1. Student organisations

There are approximately 55,000 students at the university, represented by individual campus organisations and the university-wide Monash Postgraduate Association.

Other notable student organisations include:

  1. See also
  1. Notes and references
    1. ^ http://www.monash.edu.au/about/vcmessage.html
    2. ^ http://www.monash.edu/about/overview/snapshot.html
    3. ^ http://www.monash.edu.au/about/
    4. ^ http://www.ita.monash.edu/
    5. ^ http://www.iitbmonash.org/about.html
    6. ^ Did you know? – (Monash Memo, 9 July 2008)
    7. ^ VTAC:Institutions
    8. ^ Monash Memo – University News
    9. ^ http://www.adm.monash.edu.au/execserv/council/meetings/2007/07-05cnm.html

10.  ^ http://www.monash.edu.au/news/newsline/story/1401

11.  ^ Top VCE students choose Monash, Monash University

12.  ^ Official shield and motto, Monash University

13.  ^ List of Australian Universities with date of foundation

14.  ^ History, Clayton campus, Monash University

15.  ^ Previous exhibitions – Rare Books Collection (Monash University Library)

16.  ^ Where have all the rebels gone? – About the University – The University of Sydney

17.  ^ About the Trust

18.  ^ Those were the days, Monash Magazine article

19.  ^ Monash University 50th Anniversary, Monash University

20.  ^ Our Contribution – Monash IVF Australia

21.  ^ Simon Marginson, Monash: Remaking the University, Allen & Unwin, 2000, p. 97

22.  ^ Brief history of Monash (Monash University)

23.  ^ Statistics, Monash University

24.  ^ Simon Marginson, “Monash University” in The Encyclopaedia of Melbourne, Andrew Brown-May & Shurlee Swain (eds), Cambridge University Press, Port Melbourne, 2005

25.  ^ Australian Stem Cell Centre

26.  ^ Media Release: VICTORIA TO HOST KEY SEMINARS AT BIO2006

27.  ^ Monash academic to head Victoria’s Regenerative Medicine Institute – (Monash Memo, 9 May 2007)

28.  ^ Official Australian Synchrotron website

29.  ^ Mannix College

30.  ^ http://www.monash.edu.au/campuses/caulfield/campuspresentation21may2008.pdf

31.  ^ News, Gippsland Campus, Monash University

32.  ^ http://www.iitbmonash.org/about.html

33.  ^ http://www.monash.edu.au/news/newsline/story/1474

34.  ^ http://www.campusreview.com.au/pages/section/article.php?s=Faculty+Focus&ss=Engineering%2C+IT%2FComputer+Science%2C+Architecture+%26+Design&idArticle=6117

35.  ^ The Times Higher Education Supplement

36.  ^ Institute of Higher Education, Shanghai Jiao Tong University.

37.  ^ http://www.globaluniversitiesranking.org/images/banners/top-100(eng).pdf

38.  ^ “The Top 100 Global Universities, Newsweek” Newsweek’s ranking of Monash University.

39.  ^ Monash University’s MBA rank with EIU.

40.  ^ Monash University’s Webometric ranking

41.  ^ Melbourne Institute rankings

42.  ^ Reputation

43.  ^ Student union lashes unis for ‘poor support’ The Australian

44.  ^ http://www.monash.edu.au/news/newsline/story/1519

45.  ^ http://www.topuniversities.com/university-rankings/world-university-rankings/2008/indicator-rankings/employer-review

46.  ^ http://www.topuniversities.com/university-rankings/world-university-rankings/2008/indicator-rankings/international-students

47.  ^ Monash Newsline (Monash University)

48.  ^ http://business-schools.webometrics.info/rank_by_country.asp?country=au

49.  ^ Rare Books Collection (Monash University Library)

50.  ^ 50 years of art, Monash Magazine, issue 21, 2008

51.  ^ MUMA Monash University Museum of Art

52.  ^ http://www.monash.edu.au/pubs/monmag/issue24-2009/features/on-the-move.html

53.  ^ Switchback gallery

54.  ^ Faculty Gallery

55.  ^ http://sport.monash.edu.au/about.html

56.  ^ http://www.sport.monash.edu.au/sportsprograms/sports-clubs.html

57.  ^ http://www.sport.monash.edu/aug/

58.  ^ New Monash University Vice-Chancellor appointed

59.  ^
MAD – The Monash Association of Debaters – We’re MAD

  1. External links

 

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