Accommodation

Apartment, home stay, residence or hostel?

Finding good, affordable accommodation in Australia can be challenging. But, there’s no need to worry! One of our advisors can help you find accommodation in Australia – free of charge. They will take your needs and budget into account, to find you an ideal living situation.

We advise you move well in advance and start looking for that one special place you’re going to call home, as soon as possible.

To find the place you’re going to call home, however, we advise you to move well in advance. A place that ticks all the right boxes isn’t going to stay on the market for long.


BOOK YOUR ACCOMMODATION NOW

SHARED APARTMENTS

Shared apartments are the most common choice and are convenient for medium to long term stays. You will be sharing an apartment with fellow students or workers and can choose between single room, double or triple sharing.

For those who are travelling in pairs, a self-contained Studio apartment may be a suitable option.

Prices range depending on cities and areas. A double-shared room in Sydney may be priced between $130 and $180 per person, per week.

HOME STAY

Living with an Australian family is a great way to kick off your Australian adventure. It is a unique experience that can help you understand the culture and quickly improve your English. The families are carefully selected to meet requirements and will offer you a warm welcoming (they will be just as excited as you are).

You will have a single room and may choose between half board and overnight stay. Home stay accommodation is the ideal solution for those looking for a privacy at accessible rates.

A home stay can range from a minimum of four weeks to the entire duration of the course you’re taking. In some cases, it is possible to extend your stay after the initial period.

Many students choose a home stay to get settled in before switching to shared accommodation.

RESIDENCE FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENT

Some Australian institutions may arrange accommodation for their students. These can be apartments, student halls or self-contained residences.

To live in a residence means sharing the company of males and females from all over the world outside the classroom. It is a great way to socialise and meet new friends, making the best of the experience.

You can choose a single, double, triple sharing room or dorm, depending on your budget and privacy requirements. Breakfast is usually included in the rent.

HOSTEL

A hostel is the best way to meet people from all over the world in complete freedom. This choice usually represents the starting point of the adventure and provides a safe base whilst searching for an apartment upon arrival.

This is a convenient short-term solution before moving into long-term accommodation such as an apartment or student accommodation.

Australia has many hostels to choose from as it’s the preferred choice of many backpackers that visit the country. Our student advisors will help you select the best one for you!

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Boost your jobs opportunities in Australia!

As Australia seeks to increase migration as part of its economic recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic, here is some of the major immigration changes that have been announced.


A doubling of that pre-pandemic rate would see net migration leap to more than 400,000 a year, a staggering surge that would see the population swell by 2 million by 2026.





Australia needs an explosive post-World War II-style immigration surge that could bring in 2 million people over five years to rebuild the economy and address worsening labour shortages, according to NSW government advice to new Premier Dominic Perrottet.





Top bureaucrats last week urged Mr Perrottet to seize the national leadership initiative by pushing a “national dialogue on an aggressive resumption of immigration levels as a key means of economic recovery and post-pandemic growth”.





“An ambitious national immigration plan similar to Australia’s post-World War II approach would ensure Australia would benefit from skills, investment and population growth,” Mr Perrottet was told in the advice, which was seen by The Australian Financial Review.





The top-secret, politically sensitive document was prepared by the NSW government’s top mandarins as part of an incoming premier’s brief put together by the Department of Premier and Cabinet. It is understood the advice was delivered to his desk when he took up the job last week.









In a sign the new Premier is taking the advice seriously, Mr Perrottet on Monday said the borders need to be opened up amid a “general labour” shortage to ensure a healthy economic recovery.





An incoming premier brief from top bureaucrats within the NSW Department of Premier and Cabinet have told Premier Dominic Perrottet that Australia needs an explosive surge of 2 million migrants to boost the economy:





Top bureaucrats last week urged Mr Perrottet to seize the national leadership initiative by pushing a “national dialogue on an aggressive resumption of immigration levels as a key means of economic recovery and post-pandemic growth”.





“An ambitious national immigration plan similar to Australia’s post-World War II approach would ensure Australia would benefit from skills, investment and population growth,” Mr Perrottet was told in the advice, which was seen by The Australian Financial Review.





“If we lose this opportunity, those skilled migrants will go to other countries,” he said. “We won’t get those engineers, those accountants, they’ll commit to other projects.”









Mr Perrottet is pushing to end NSW’s 14-day hotel quarantine system and replace it with a shorter period of home-based isolation, and is also revisiting inbound passenger caps.





“We need to get away from that formal beds quarantine system and to something that’s more suitable to bring people in and out of this country on a more fluid basis.





“I think by next year we’ll see a very different sort of immigration policy, and I hope we’ll start to see more people coming in and filling those jobs.”





‘Shameless’ push for skilled migration





The top bureaucrats told Mr Perrottet that NSW under his predecessor Gladys Berejiklian has played a “proactive role” in pushing for the reopening of the Australian economy, and was joined in recent weeks by Victoria and the Commonwealth “pushing a position focused on living with COVID-19″.





They also took a swipe at premiers and chief ministers of Queensland, Tasmania, Western Australia and the ACT, whose attitudes they described as “resistant”.





“It is highly likely that NSW will reopen its international borders ahead of other states/territories and in the absence of any national agreement.”





Mr Perrottet was told that a “time-limited” immigration surge could include a “doubling” of pre-COVID immigration levels for the next five years and “unashamedly” focusing on “the skilled migration we need to develop key industry sectors”.





Population growth since the pandemic has collapsed after federal and state governments unwittingly embarked on one of the most wide-reaching post-war policy experiments ever conducted by closing off immigration, a mainstay driver of jobs and economic activity in Australia for decades.





Net overseas migration added 194,400 people to Australia’s population in the year ending June 2020, a sharp drop from the 241,000 reached in 2018-19.





Net migration leap to more than 400,000 a year





A doubling of that pre-pandemic rate would see net migration leap to more than 400,000 a year, a staggering surge that would see the population swell by 2 million by 2026.





“There is a need to return to higher levels of migration across the board, both in terms of skilled migration and being more generous to people coming in under specialist humanitarian visas and, indeed, international students returning on temporary visas,” said Peter Shergold, chancellor of Western Sydney University and the Commonwealth’s former top bureaucrat.





“These things are very important to the economic future of NSW.”





Source : afr.com



Australia's education minister Alan Tudge, has pledged a rapid increase in international students returning next year with hopes tens of thousands could be welcomed.





Alan Tudge on Friday told an international education conference the federal government was considering ways to rapidly expedite the return of students.





"Looking into next year, my expectation is that we will have very significant numbers coming in," he said.





"I cannot put a figure on that just yet, but my hope would be that tens of thousands can return."





Mr Tudge said limits would apply in the short-term but he remained hopeful caps would be scrapped to allow demand to drive student numbers rather than available places.





"When that occurs, I am confident that students will return in significant numbers."





Australia will restart international travel from November with citizens and permanent residents the first priority for arrivals and departures.





Skilled migrants and students from overseas are expected to be next, ahead of tourists.





"These are all very promising and they are happening this year," Mr Tudge said.





The education minister also wants a greater diversity of students entering Australia, which has largely relied on five countries but particularly China and India.





Mr Tudge said a concentrated market had financial risks and could also diminish local and overseas students' experience.





"Some universities have responded to this through limits on international students and limits on proportion of students from any one country," he said.





"We would obviously like to see universities themselves taking the lead on this, but we are also thinking deeply about policies to help facilitate this."





He said a greater diversity of courses for international students should be more closely aligned with Australia's skill needs so more people could become long-term residents.





International students to return to NSW from December 2021





NSW is expected to have around 500 international students return in December, while details around a South Australian plan are also being finalised.





From December 2021, a small, but increasing number of international students enrolled with New South Wales (NSW) education providers will have the opportunity to return to Australia to continue their studies on campus.





Under the pilot returns program, 500 students will return to the Australian state this year as part of the Australian Government-approved New South Wales International Student Arrivals Pilot Plan.





The plan sees 250 fully vaccinated students allowed to return to Australia in the first two weeks of December, followed by another 250 students in the second two weeks of that month.





Participating students must be fully-vaccinated with a COVID-19 vaccination recognised by Australia's Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) before they arrive in Sydney, and will be required to quarantine in purpose-built student accommodation in Sydney (regardless of which education provider they are enrolled with).





The selection of students for return to Australia, and the funding of the pilot program, will be managed and run by the New South Wales tertiary sector.





“This is an important milestone for NSW and reinforces the State’s standing as a world-leading study destination, especially for any international student considering NSW as the next place to learn and live in their education journey,” the announcement from Study NSW says.





The success of the pilot program will determine the next steps regarding its future expansion, which could involve school students by that stage.





The Australian Government continues to work closely with all of Australia’s states and territories on further development of student return and arrival plans.





International students could return to Victoria by the end of 2021





Here's the latest news in Australia for international students — hundreds could return to Victorian universities by the end of the year.





In the latest news in Australia for students, hundreds of international students could reportedly return to Victoria by the end of the year following the state government’s approval of a plan to revive the 14 billion Australian dollar international education sector that has been badly affected by COVID-19.





Quoting a senior government source, The Age said 120 international students could be permitted to arrive in Victoria per week. Universities could cover the hotel quarantine costs under a plan to be sent to the Commonwealth for approval by the end of the week.


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