January 19, 2019
Skill Select Update

Good news for our clients; in the last skill select invitation round (being 11 October 2018) the number of invitations issued for the subclass 189 visa more than tripled. The total number of invitations went up from 2,490 to 4,340. That’s a significant 74% increase.

The point score cut-off remains 70, with the number of invitations sent out to those who claimed 70 points more than tripling from 605 to 1,903.

More good news for our clients in IT sector; the points required for “Software and Applications Programmers” and “Computer Network Professionals” dropped from 75 to 70 points.

The other capped occupation groups remain unchanged, with points required for Accountants and Auditors remaining at 80. This shows the high calibre of applicants in these occupations, many of whom have superior English skills and have completed a period of education in Australia.

Points required for Electronics, Mechanical, Industrial & Production engineers remains stable at 70. Points required for Environmental Engineers remains at 75 with Civil & Electrical Engineer occupations remaining uncapped.

Our clients on 70 points are receiving invitations, however, you can still expect to wait approximately 3 months. For our clients on fewer points, or who wish to obtain a faster invitation, state sponsorship still remains the best option.

There are currently many opportunities for potential immigrants in the general skilled migration program. Consulting and working with a qualified MARA migration agent will ensure that you receive the most up-to-date, professional and timely information, and that your application will be handled in accordance with best practice.

To enquire about a migration assessment, or if you have any questions, please feel free to contact MARA licensed migration agent Feriha Güney (MARN 0960690) or Australian Lawyer (NSW) Ceren Güney on +90 546 946 38 11 / +61 2 9232 7055 / +61 477 524 039. Alternatively, please feel free to email us at [email protected]

January 19, 2019

The new year brings changes to an ever-shifting Australian immigration system.
1. Longer processing times for partner visas

marriage
Partner visas take longer to process.

Because the Family Violence Bill passed in the Senate last November, partner visa sponsorships need to be approved first before applications are lodged. This means that potential offshore applicants and sponsors will have to pass through a stringent process to assess their character and history. This will then prolong the process of obtaining a partner visa.
2. An introduction of a new temporary sponsored parent visa

grandparents
Parents of permanent residents and citizens can stay temporarily in Australia for either 3 or 5 years.

This year, Australian citizens and permanent residents will be able to bring their parents from overseas to Australia.
Only 15,000 visas will be granted each year. Once approved, these parent visas will be valid for three or five years, costing $5,000 and $10,000 respectively.
The said visas are renewable, but only up to a maximum of 10 years when combined.
3. An increase in show money for foreign students to more than $20,000

graduates
Evidence of funds will increase in 2019.

This year, students have to be able to provide evidence of funds of around $20,290. Bringing in a partner is an additional $7,100 and an additional $3,040 needs to be provided for each child.
4. Matching ATO tax records to salaries of employer-sponsored migrants

Tax
The Department of Home Affairs and ATO will make sure employer-sponsored migrants are paid what they are due.

This year, the Department of Home Affairs will be cracking down on companies underpaying employer-sponsored migrants.
In partnership with the ATO, the department will be gathering the tax file numbers of those who currently hold a 457/482 TSS visa in order to match them with current tax records to make sure that the said migrants are being paid the right amount based on their nominated salary.
5. South Australia visa for start-up entrepreneurs

Business
South Australia will pilot a program in 2019 for start-up owners who want to migrate to Australia.

The state is set to pilot a new visa for start-up entrepreneurs which isn’t as difficult to obtain as a Business and Innovation visa. The said visa doesn’t require a $200,000 funding arrangement and only a 5 average band score on the IELTS.
Applicants are required to provide the state with an original idea and business plan in order to obtain this visa.
Source: www.avustralyagocajansi.com

January 19, 2019

AUSTRALIAN PERMANENT RESIDENCY in NORTHERN TERRİTORY

Over the next five years, low skilled migrants with limited English will have the option to apply for permanent residency after living and working in the Northern Territory for at least three years.

From cooks to family day care workers to motor mechanics, low skilled migrants will now be able to apply for Australia’s permanent residency.

Northern Territory has opened its door to skilled migrants in 117 occupations and has offered a pathway to permanent residency to these workers who are willing to work and live in the region for at least three years.

In a bid to distribute the migrant population outside Australia’s major cities such as Sydney and Melbourne, the Australian government has designed a new scheme to attract migrants to regional areas across the country.

The scheme – known as the Designation Area Migration Agreements (DAMA)s has been announced for two regions in Australia – Warrnambool region in Victoria and the Northern Territory which are experiencing labour shortages and need a population boost.

The second-such agreement for NT, this time with a pathway to permanent residency, DAMA II came into effect on January 1st 2019.

NT DAMA II Occupation List

Occupations
Accountant (General)
Accounts Clerk
Aeroplane Pilot
Aged or Disabled Carer
Agricultural and Horticultural Mobile Plant Operator
Airconditioning and Refrigeration Mechanic
Aircraft Maintenance Engineer (Avionics)
Aircraft Maintenance Engineer (Mechanical)
Aquaculture Farmer
Arborist
Automotive Electrician
Baker
Bar Attendant Supervisor
Barista
Beauty Therapist
Beef Cattle Farmer
Bookkeeper
Bus Driver
Butcher or Smallgoods Maker
Cabinetmaker
Cabler (Data and Telecommunications)
Cafe or Restaurant Manager
Carpenter
Chef
Chief Executive or Managing Director
Child Care Centre Manager
Child Care Worker
Civil Engineering Technician
Community Worker
Conference and Event Organiser
Cook
Cook (includes Ethnic Cuisine)
Crowd Controller
Customer Service Manager
Deck Hand
Dental Assistant
Diesel Motor Mechanic
Disabilities Services Officer
Diver
Early Childhood (Pre-primary School) Teacher
Earth Science Technician
Earthmoving Plant Operator (General)
Electrical Linesworker
Electronic Instrument Trades Worker (General)
Excavator Operator
Facilities Manager
Family Day Care Worker
Family Support Worker
Fitter (General)
Fitter and Turner
Fitter-Welder
Floor Finisher
Flying Instructor
Forklift Driver
Fruit or Nut Grower
Gaming Worker
Hair or Beauty Salon Manager
Hairdresser
Hardware Technician
Hotel or Motel Manager
Hotel or Motel Receptionist
Hotel Service Manager
ICT Customer Support Officer
ICT Support Technicians nec
Interpreter
Landscape Gardener
Licensed Club Manager
Linemarker
Management Accountant
Marketing Specialist
Metal Fabricator
Mixed Crop and Livestock Farmer
Mixed Crop Farmer
Mixed Livestock Farmer
Motor Mechanic (General)
Motor Vehicle or Caravan Salesperson
Motor Vehicle Parts and Accessories Fitter (General)
Motor Vehicle Parts Interpreter
Motorcycle Mechanic
Nursing Support Worker
Office Manager
Out of School Hours Care Worker
Panelbeater
Personal Care Assistant
Pharmacy Technician
Plumber (General)
Pressure Welder
Program or Project Administrator
Property Manager
Recreation Officer
Residential Care Worker
Retail Manager (General)
Retail Supervisor
Sales and Marketing Manager
Sheetmetal Trades Worker
Ship’s Engineer
Ship’s Master
Small Engine Mechanic
Sound Technician
Supply and Distribution Manager
Taxation Accountant
Telecommunications Cable Jointer
Telecommunications Linesworker
Telecommunications Technician
Therapy Aide
Tour Guide
Truck Driver (General)
Vegetable Grower
Vehicle Painter
Veterinary Nurse
Waiter Supervisor
Waste Water or Water Plant Operator
Web Administrator
Web Designer
Welder (First Class)
Welfare Worker
Youth Worker

NT Chief Minister Michael Gunner said the addition of the pathway to permanent residency in DAMA II gave skilled migrants a big incentive to move to the NT and stay long-term.

“The Territory Labor Government’s number one priority is jobs for Territorians but we know access to, and retention of, a suitably skilled workforce is a key issue for many employers and there is a need for additional workers, Mr Gunner said.

“We also know that more people moving to the Territory equals more jobs.

“The Territory Labor Government fought hard for the inclusion of the pathway to permanent residency in this new five-year agreement, which we expect to significantly increase the number of skilled migrants moving to the Territory.

“The NT has a long and proud history of migration of overseas nationals and they have been a key contributor to economic growth, population growth and social diversity. This new agreement will help that continue.”

Source: SBS

December 28, 2017

Population growth will help propel Australia to become the world’s 11th biggest economy within a decade, a report predicts.
The London-based Centre for Economics and Business Research is forecasting Australia will climb two places on its world economic league table by 2026 from its current ranking of 13.
Countries that depend on brainpower to drive their economies will generally overtake those dependent on natural resources, with China tipped to replace the US as the world’s biggest economy in 2030, the centre says.
While Australia’s economic growth has been fuelled by resources in recent years, the centre also noted that it’s become one of the most popular countries in the world for inward migration.

The London-based Centre for Economics and Business Research is forecasting Australia will climb two places on its world economic league table by 2026 from its current ranking of 13. And it’s particularly Australia’s intake of migrants with highly sought-after skills that will help fuel its future growth.
“Australia is one of the most popular countries in the world for inward migration as well as having natural resources.
“The growing population means that the economy is forecast to rise from 13th largest in 2017 to 11th largest economy in 2026.
“Investment in urban infrastructure will need to accelerate as population increases.”
Australia welcomed 245,400 immigrants in the year ending June 30, 2017, a 27 per cent increase from the year before.
 

“The growing population means the economy is forecast to rise from 13th largest in 2017 to 11th largest economy in 2026,” said the centre’s 2018 World Economic League Table, which ranks the world’s economies by gross domestic product measured in US dollars at market prices to 2030.
Image result for australia 11th biggest economy
 

December 14, 2017


Australia’s international education industry has strengthened across the board, pushing student numbers to new record levels according to the latest data. But doubts have started to emerge over how long the country can maintain its growth streak.
Records continued to fall for Australian international education, but clouds are starting to form, as the country’s reliance on China increases.
The number of international students within Australia currently sits at 9.4% above the 554,200 for the whole of 2016

Year to October data, released by the Department of Education and Training, shows more than 606,700 international students have entered Australia so far in 2017, a 13% increase from the level achieved by the same time in 2016, while enrolments and commencements also experienced double-digit percentage growth.

“The more Australia can do to discover or seek out new markets, the better for the international education sector as a whole”
The surge in numbers has also pushed up total revenue, with the Australian Bureau of Statistics indicating the 12 months to September period grew to a landmark $29.4bn, up from $28.4bn last quarter.
The figure for students, enrolments and commencements as of October has already surpassed that for the whole of 2016.
The number of international students within Australia currently sits 9.4% above the 2016 total of 554,200, while enrolments and commencements – the number of new enrolments in a calendar year – are 7.5% and 2% higher, respectively.
English Australia noted September 2017’s figures were 6.7% down from September 2016
While the figures are welcomed in Australia, not all sectors and source markets experienced consistent improvements, casting doubt over how long the boom will last.
Although 3.3% above the previous year’s October figures, ELICOS stands alone as the only sector to not yet surpass 2016 totals, and after a strong first half of 2017, experienced two consecutive declines in commencements in August and September.
It was the only major sector to do so.
In its latest market analysis report, English Australia noted September 2017’s figures were 6.7% down from September 2016, representing “arguably the first poor month at the national aggregate level for ELICOS in recent years.”
Meanwhile, China further strengthened its position as Australia’s top source market, increasing 18% from the same period in 2016 and pushing its market share across all sectors from 27.5% to approximately 30%; reaching as high as 60% for some sectors.
source:  thepienews.com

[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]

 

November 22, 2017

According to the Migration Legislation Amendment Regulations 2017 that came into effect on 18th November 2017, an existing condition, 8303 has been amended to expand its scope. Under the new migration rules, many Australian temporary visas will be subject to a condition that will enable the Immigration Department to cancel a person’s visa if they are found to be involved in online vilification based on gender, sexuality, religion, and ethnicity.
Before 18 November 2017, the condition that earlier applied to only a few visas, is now applicable to most temporary visas applied for on.  This condition now also applies to

  • temporary graduate visa (Subclass 485)
  • skilled regional (485),
  • student visa and
  • visitor visa.

The Immigration Minister now has the power to cancel a visa if there is evidence of a visa holder engaging in harassment, stalking, intimidation, bullying or threatening a person even if it doesn’t amount to a criminal sanction. These activities may include public ‘hate speech’ or online vilification targeted at both groups and individuals based on gender, sexuality, religion, and ethnicity.
The Department of Immigration says that the new change: “It sends a clear message, explicitly requiring that the behaviour of temporary visa holders is consistent with Australian government and community expectations.  It advises visa holders what sorts of behaviour can result in visa cancellation.”
The Immigration Department says its officers have the discretion to determine whether the condition has been breached. They also have the discretion to not cancel the visa even when the condition has been breached.
No one should break the law but even behaviour that may not necessarily warrant a criminal sanction can be deemed a breach of this condition. So it is important to remember that your actions online may have consequences just like your real-life actions.

November 15, 2017

Australian economy is growing exponentially with spectacular economic boom in almost all engineering diciplines but espacially, Civil, Industrial, Mechanical, Mechatronics, and Production engineering sectors. Civil, Industrial, Mechanical, Mechatronics, and Production Engineers with relevant experience are in greater demand in Australia.
Australian Government has opened skilled migration visas for Engineers to reduce the serious shortages of overcome the delay in projects. Civil, Industrial, Mechanical, Mechatronics, and Production Engineers are in great demand in Australia.
The minimum entry requirement for these occupations is a bachelor degree or higher qualification. In some instances relevant experience is required in addition to the formal qualification.
Industrial Engineering Professionals (ANZSCO Skill Level 1) Investigates and reviews the utilisation of personnel, facilities, equipment and materials, current operational processes and established practices, to recommend improvement in the efficiency of operations in a variety of commercial, industrial and production environments. Registration or licensing may be required. Industrial Engineers may have specialization as Process Engineer.
Mechanical Engineering Professionals (ANZSCO Skill Level 1) Plans, designs, organises and oversees the assembly, erection, operation and maintenance of mechanical and process plant and installations. Registration or licensing may be required. Mechanical Engineers may have specialization as an Airconditioning Engineer or Heating and Ventilation Engineer.
Production Engineering Professionals (ANZSCO Skill Level 1) Plans, directs and coordinates the design, construction, modification, continued performance and maintenance of equipment and machines in industrial plants, and the management and planning of manufacturing activities. Production may have specialization as an Automation and Control Engineer.
Required Job Tasks for Civil, Industrial, Mechanical, Mechatronics, and Production Engineers 

  • Studying functional statements, organisational charts and project information to determine functions and responsibilities of workers and work units and to identify areas of duplication „
  • Establishing work measurement programs and analysing work samples to develop standards for labour utilisation „
  • Analysing workforce utilisation, facility layout, operational data and production schedules and costs to determine optimum worker and equipment efficiencies „
  • Designing mechanical equipment, machines, components, products for manufacture, and plant and systems for construction „
  • Developing specifications for manufacture, and determining materials, equipment, piping, material flows, capacities and layout of plant and systems „
  • Organising and managing project labour and the delivery of materials, plant and equipment „
  • Establishing standards and policies for installation, modification, quality control, testing, inspection and maintenance according to engineering principles and safety regulations
  • Inspecting plant to ensure optimum performance is maintained „
  • Directing the maintenance of plant buildings and equipment, and coordinating the requirements for new designs, surveys and maintenance schedules

Immigration to Australia for Civil, Industrial, Mechanical, Mechatronics, and Production Engineers
Industrial, Mechanical, and Production Engineers needs to prepare Competency Demonstration Report (CDR) before applying for Skilled Migration for Australia. Engineers Australia is the designated authority to assess professional and Para-professional qualifications in engineering for the purposes of skilled migration to Australia for most engineering occupations.
Occupational Categories to Assess Engineering Degree from Engineers Australia
Engineers Australia recognises three occupational categories within the engineering team in Australia:

  • Professional Engineer
  • Engineering Technologist
  • Engineering Associate
  • For migration purposes, an additional category of Engineering Manager is also recognised

Recognising Civil, Industrial, Mechanical, Mechatronics, and Production Engineering Qualifications in Australia
To recognise your Engineering qualification in Australia, you need to assess your qualification/ degree through Engineers Australia. There are two pathways to assess your qualifications. If your Engineering Qualification is recognized by Washington AccordDublin Accord or Sydney Accord, then you need not to prepare Competency Demonstration Report (CDR).
In other case you need to write Competency Demonstration Report (CDR) to assess your Engineering degree and finally to apply for Skilled Migration of Australia.
Degree Assessment from Engineers Australia
You need to submit your application with all relevant documents plus assessment fee. Following documents are required to assess your engineering degree through Competency Demonstration Report (CDR) pathway:

  • Application Form available at Engineers Australia‘s website
  • Declarations Page 
  • Three Career Episodes (CEs)
  • CV/ Resume
  • Continual Professional Development (CPD) Report  
  • Summary Statement (SS)
  • IELTS Result
  • Certified Academic Transcripts and Experience Letters

Note: Engineering degree assessment process may take up to 16 weeks from the date of receipt, however the time period keeps varying depending upon the work load.
English Proficiency Test
Minimum English requirement for your Engineering Degree Assessment through Engineers Australia is overall 6.0 band in IELTS or any equivalent English proficiency test (e.g. Cambridge/ TOFEL, etc.). Your band should not be less than 6.0 in any of the four modules; reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Both General Training and Academic version of the IELTS are acceptable.  Applicants who are native English speakers or who have completed an Australian undergraduate engineering qualification, or who have completed a Masters Degree or PhD program at an Australian university may be exempted from IELTS.
Application for Skilled Migration Visa as an Civil, Industrial, Mechanical, Mechatronics, and Production Engineer
Once you have received your positive skill assessment from Engineers Australia, it means that your qualification is recognized in Australia and you are eligible to work as an Engineer in Australia. After getting the positive skill assessment you can apply for your Skilled Migration Visa (Visa Class; 189 or 190 or 489). You are welcome to Australia along with your family after the approval of your visa application. Presently you can apply for your visa through EOI system on Australian Immigration and Border Protection website.
Visa Agency – Australia is helping engineers from all disciplines and particularly Industrial, Civil, Mechanical, and Production Engineers to review their Competency Demonstration Report (CDR). CDR samples are available that will help as a guideline. Competency Demonstration Report (CDR) is the most critical step for getting Australian Skilled Migration and we don’t recommend you to take any risk.

November 15, 2017

After giving birth to your own baby since migrating down under you will  had a number of comments made on this associated post asking what the immigration status, residency or citizenship status of your own baby will be following the birth.
With this in mind we thought to write up an article to summarise the residency and citizenship status of your baby should you be blessed with the birth of a new child whilst spending your time down under.
If you applied for your Permanent Residency visa before your baby was born the following circumstances will normally apply.
1.If your baby is born in Australia, and at least one parent is an Australian permanent visa holder or Australian citizen,

  • your baby is an Australian citizen by birth.
  • No Australian visa is required for this baby.
  • Baby born australian citizen
  1. If your baby is born in Australia and neither parent is an Australian citizen or permanent visa holder,
  • your baby will generally automatically acquire the visa of either parent dependent on whichever visa is more “beneficial”.
  1. If your baby is born outside Australia, and at least one parent is an Australian citizen otherwise than by descent,
  • your baby is eligible for Australian citizenship by descent.
  1. If your baby is born outside Australia and at least one parent is an Australian citizen by descent and that parent was present in Australia lawfully for at least 2 years before your baby’s citizenship registration,
  • your baby is eligible for Australian citizenship by descent.
  1. If your baby is born outside Australia, and neither parent is an Australian citizen,
  • your baby has no immigration status in Australia and will need a visa to enter Australia.
  1. If I have my Australian visa, but not validated it, and my child is born outside Australia
  • If your Australian Visa has already been granted to you but you’ve not been to Australia to validate the Visa then you’re newborn child will not automatically be granted a visa as part of your own application.
  • You will have to advise the DIAC about the new addition to your family, as a change of circumstances before you validate your own Visa as your baby will have to be sponsored on a child visa in its own right.
  • This is normally a straight forward process however you should add at least 10 – 12 weeks for the new baby to be added.
July 14, 2017
Tasmanian state government offer a new visa category that could provide visa-holders a pathway to Australian permanent residency.
Australia is proving to be one of the most popular immigration destinations in the world. With a total annual intake of nearly 200,000, the country evokes the interest of visa-seekers from all over the globe.
Apart from the Skilled Independent visa that allows visa-holders to settle anywhere in Australia, different Australian states and territories have their own immigration programs which are run in accordance with their particular skills and economic requirements, under which the states nominate eligible applicants for skilled migration.
Tasmania, an island state off Australia’s south coast has introduced a new visa category for overseas applicants which will allow them to live and work in the state for four years and also offers a pathway to permanent residency in Australia.

From 1 July this year, a new category for the Skilled Regional (Provisional) visa (Subclass 489) has been introduced for Tasmanian state nomination for overseas applicants. They are eligible to apply for this category as offshore applicants.


Visa subclass 489 allows visa holders to live and work in Tasmania for up to four years.

A state nomination from Tasmania adds 10 points to a skilled visa applicant’s overall score required to qualify for a visa under Australia’s Department of Immigration and Border Protection point test.
After having lived in the state for at least two years and worked full-time (35 hours per week) for at least one year during their stay, visa holders become eligible to apply for permanent residency in Australia.

In order to apply for this visa, an applicant is required to nominate an occupation from Tasmania’s Skilled Occupation List and provide sufficient proof of employment opportunities in the state. Applicants can also secure a genuine offer of employment from employers.
More information send your CV or contact us. 



 

 
 

July 3, 2017

Almost nine out of 10 international students studying in Sydney would recommend the city to their friends as a place to live and study, despite persistent complaints about the high cost of public transport and accommodation, according to the first major research done on the experiences of international students in Australia.
Sydney attracts more of Australia’s $20 billion international student market than any other city, with about 50,000 enrolled at university and another 50,000 at vocational and English-language institutions in the city last year, according to federal data.

The size of the international student community in the city, and their ability to promote Sydney around the world, drove the City of Sydney to commission UTS to undertake the research.
“International students make a real contribution to Sydney’s prosperity, they add so much to our cultural life and down the track help to connect our city back to their homes around the globe,” Lord Mayor Clover Moore said.
“When students go home, we hope they will talk about their time here, encouraging their peers to follow in their footsteps. Some may even return with families to take up key roles as their careers develop. It all adds to Sydney’s standing as a global city that attracts and retains talent.”
While Sydney was generally seen as a desirable and safe location to study in, a minority of students surveyed reported exploitation by employers and landlords, discrimination and isolation.
Two students described how “international students don’t get treated in the same way as local students do”.
Concerns have been raised in the past – including by vice-chancellors – that international students are treated like cash cows by the Australian government and universities.Chinese student Jing Su has enjoyed her time in Sydney despite the cost of living.

But if they agreed, respondents to the survey seemed mostly too polite to say so.
UNSW postgraduate student Jing Su, 28, from Quanzhou in south-east China, first saw Sydney in the opening ceremony of the 2000 Olympic Games.

“I always wanted to go to the US but I have two friends who have done their education here and gone back to China, and when I asked their advice, they said:’You should go to Sydney, it’s actually a great place for us’. And I always liked the beach and sunlight.”
Ms Su said she had found it relatively easy to find accommodation – a homestay arrangement with a family in Clovelly, who she is teaching Mandarin – and casual work during her university holidays, but that costs were high.

“The tuition fees are way expensive for international students,” she said. “We pay several times more than the locals, plus we have to find our accommodation and travel costs. It’s quite expensive.”
Breaking down barriers between different cultural groups was also difficult.
“[For] a lot of my friends it’s a little bit hard for them,” she said. “I don’t know why. When we walk into the classroom they automatically sit in their group. Back in China we’re not used to how if you have a question you just raise up your hand, we think that’s interrupting the teacher. But this is changing a lot as well from my generation.”
Linus Faustin is a 22-year-old UTS communications student from Tanzania, who has been in Australia since 2015.
“Finding work is a challenge,” he said, not least because there is “discrimination against international students”.
He said it was unfair that international students do not get the same public transport concessions as locals. “It’s about time for equal fares. International students already pay so much to be able to study full-time,” he said.
Mr Faustin said experiencing racism on public transport was common, but it is not just international students who are victims.
The UTS research was based on online surveys and interviews conducted in mid-2016.

Eighty per cent of respondents enjoyed studying in Sydney, 88 per cent of students said they would recommend Sydney as a place to study, 66 per cent of students had completed paid work, with 82 per cent of those saying they were treated fairly at work and 55 per cent said they received help finding a place to live when they arrived in Sydney.
Major concerns before arrival were the cost of living, finding a job and being able to speak English, but these concerns diminished during their stay.

Sydney’s universities have benefited enormously from the international student boom during the last decade, reaping fees of up to four times what local students pay to attend the same course.

In October 2016, the most recent figures available, Australia had 683,000 international student enrolments, with the largest share – 256,875 – in NSW. The majority of these – 72,429 – were from China, followed by India, Thailand, Brazil and Indonesia.

July 3, 2017

The Short‑term Skilled Occupation List (STSOL) will be applicable for Subclass 190 (Skilled—Nominated visa) or Subclass 489 (Skilled—Regional (Provisional) visa.
The Medium and Long-term Strategic Skills List (MLTSSL) will be applicable for General Skilled migration visas – Subclass 189 (Skilled Independent Visa), Subclass 489 (Skilled Regional Provisional Visa who are not nominated by a State or Territory government agency) and Subclass 485 (Graduate Temporary Visa) visa applications.

July 3, 2017
Previously Australian government had announced from 1st of July 2017, many changes to 457 visa are coming in to effect that it will introduce some reforms to Australia’s temporary employer sponsored skilled migration programmes. The reforms were to include abolishing of Temporary (Skilled) (subclass 457) visa (457 visa) and replacing it with a completely new Temporary Skills Shortage (TSS) visa from March 2018.
The changes from 1st July 2017

  • For existing 457 visas, the STSOL (Short-Term Skilled Occupation List ) will be further reviewed on the bases of advice from the Department of Employment. The MLTSSL (Medium and Long-Term Strategic Skills List) will be revised based on outcomes from Department of Education and training’s 2017-18 SOL review.
  • English language salary exemption threshold, which exempts applicants whose salary is over $96,400 from the English language requirement, will be removed.
  • Policy settings about the training benchmark requirement will be made clearer in legislative instruments.
  •  Provision of penal clearance certificates will become mandatory.
  • For existing 457 visas, before 31st December 2017, the Department of Immigration and Border Protection will start collecting the Tax File Numbers of 457 Visa holders and will match the data with Australian Tax Office’s record to make sure the visa holders are not paid less than their nominated salary.
  • The Department will also commence the publication of details relating to sponsors sanctioned for failing to meet their obligations under the Migration Regulation 1994 and related legislation.

The Changes from March 2018

  • From March 2018, the 457 visa will be abolished and replaced with the TSS visa.
  • The TSS visa will be comprised of a Short-Term stream of up to two years, and a Medium-Term stream of up to four years.
  • The Short-Term stream is designed for Australian businesses to fill skill gaps with foreign workers on a temporary basis, where a suitably skilled Australian worker cannot be sourced.
  • The Medium-Term stream will allow employers to source foreign workers to address shortages in a narrower range of high skill and critical need occupations, where a suitably skilled Australian worker cannot be sourced.


The Short-Term stream will include the following criteria:

  • Genuine entry: A genuine temporary entrant requirement.
  • Renewal: Capacity for visa renewal onshore once only.
  • Occupations:
    • For non-regional Australia, the STSOL will apply.
    • For regional Australia, the STSOL will apply, with additional occupations available to support regional employers.
    • English language requirements: A requirement of an International English Language Testing System (IELTS) (or equivalent test) score of 5, with a minimum of 4.5 in each test component.


The Medium-Term stream will include the following criteria:

  • English language requirements: a requirement of a minimum of IELTS 5 (or equivalent test) in each test component.
  • Renewal: Capacity for visa renewal onshore and a permanent residence pathway after three years.
  • Occupation lists:
    • For non-regional Australia – the MLTSSL will apply.
    • For regional Australia – the MLTSSL will apply, with additional occupations available to support regional employers.

Eligibility criteria for both streams will be:

  • Work experience: at least two years’ work experience relevant to the particular occupation.
  • Labour market testing (LMT): LMT will be mandatory, unless an international obligation applies.
  •  Minimum market salary rate: Employers must pay the Australian market salary rate and meet the Temporary Skilled Migration Income Threshold.
  •  Character: Mandatory penal clearance certificates to be provided.
  •  Workforce: A non-discriminatory workforce test to ensure employers are not actively discriminating against Australian workers.

 Training requirement: Employers nominating a worker for a TSS visa will be required to pay a contribution to the Skilling Australians Fund. The contribution will be:

  • payable in full at the time the worker is nominated;
  • $1,200 per year or part year for small businesses (those with annual turnover of less than $10 million) and $1,800 per year or part year for other businesses.

The detailed policy settings for several of these requirements will be finalised through the implementation process. Further details on these requirements to inform stakeholders will be available in due course.
Who is affected?

  • Current 457 visa applicants and holders, prospective applicants, businesses sponsoring skilled migrants and industry.
  • Existing 457 visas continue to remain in effect.
  • 457 visa applicants that had lodged their application on or before 18 April 2017, and whose application had not yet been decided, with an occupation that has been removed from the STSOL, may be eligible for a refund of their visa application fee.
  • Nominating businesses for these applications may also be eligible for a refund of related fees.

Further information could be find at border.gov.au [contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]

June 29, 2017

Image result for migration to australia timelineAustralia is one of the great country to get a first-rate education, but also it is a wonderful place to live and work. Many international students who study in Australia choose to apply for permanent residency after they finish their studies.
As an overseas student on a student visa you can apply for permanent residency under Australia’s General Skilled Migration program (GSM).
There are many different types of permanent residency visas but Skilled – Independent (Residence) visa (subclass 885) focuses on skilled migration for students who have graduated from Australian study.
When you’re considering applying for an Australian visa, whether temporary or permanent,  it’s very important that you obtain a proper eligibility assessment  from accredited professionals, based on your own personal circumstances.
For example: eligibility for Australian permanent residence involves more than passing a points test, so it’s vital your whole situation is considered before you apply and risk a visa refusal and losing your application fee of AUD $2,525.
If you are not eligible now, it’s also important to get proper advice to maximize your chances of eligibility in the future eg you may be eligible for permanent residence after studying in Australia.
Our immigration lawyers, migration agents and education counsellors are very experienced; we can answer all your questions and assess your eligibility for all Australian visas including temporary work visas and permanent residence. This will save you lots of time and money.
Contact us now at [email protected] for our personal visa eligibility assessment service which includes advice on all your options to live, work and study in Australia.
Visa Agency – Australia is an experienced talented team of immigration lawyers, migration agents and support staff dedicated to providing outstanding migration services to our many clients locally, nationally and around the world.
We have a reputation for:

  • understanding our client’s individual needs
  • finding solutions to those needs
  • service excellence
  • exceptional legal knowledge
  • achieving results
  • exceeding our client’s expectations, and
  • excelling in the practice of immigration law

Our support staff are specially chosen for their dedication to hard work and their commitment to never being happy with second best.  They are committed to assisting you and satisfying your individual needs.
We take very seriously and honour our high professional and ethical obligations to our clients. As lawyers we are bound by the strict ethical confines of the NSW Legal Profession Act and as migration agents we are bound by the strict rules, regulations and ethics of the Commonwealth Migration Act and the Migration Agents Code of Conduct.
We provide our team with free access to compulsory on-going legal and professional education as well as access to continuous hands-on learning opportunities. The result is a very happy, motivated, well-educated team at your service. It is no secret that we strive for excellence in all areas of our practice.

Mrs. Feriha Guney
Independent Consultant Migration Agent

  • Member: Migration Institute of Australia
  • Migration Agent (MARN: 0960690)
  • Education Conusltant (QEAC: C102)

You can access the CODE of CONDUCT
For further details contact [email protected]

 

International students who are

  • · between the ages of 18 and 44 and
  • · have completed at least two years of approved full-time study in Australia

can apply for permanent residency under the ‘Skilled – Independent (Residence) visa (Subclass 885)’.
For more information about who can apply for this visa, see below and visit the Australian Government’s Department of Immigration and Citizenship website atwww.immi.gov.au/skilled/general-skilled-migration/885/index.htm or contact to qualified migration agent partner that work with International Eductaion Agency – Australia.
IEA-A works with qualified migration Agent Partner is also registered as e-visa qualified migration agent for number of countries such as India. China, etc.
In order to qualify for the General Skilled Migration program, students need to satisfy a number of requirements relating to:
· Your study undertaken in Australia: you must have completed either a single qualification (degree, diploma or trade in an Australian institution, in English, registered with CRICOS) that required two years of full-time study, or more than one qualification resulting in a total of at least two years full-time study in Australia. You must apply for your visa within six months of finishing your study.
· Your location: you must be in Australia to lodge your visa application and receive the application decision.
· Your skills and qualifications: your skills and qualifications must meet the Australian requirements of your nominated occupation.
· Your health: you must undergo a medical examination and meet minimum health requirements.
· Your character: you must be able to prove that you are of ‘good character’. You will be required to provide certified copies of police checks and other relevant documents, such as any relevant military discharge papers.
The points test
In addition to the requirements above, students must get pass mark from a points tests in order to be granted permanent residency in Australia.
A minimum of 120 points must be scored on the points test for the application to be successful. Applicants score points according to how they rate for different criteria relating to:
· age
· nominated skilled occupation ( only 50 or 60 points from Skilled Occupation Lists)
· English language ability
· specific work experience
· occupation in demand / job offer
· Australian qualifications
· having completed an approved qualification in an area classed as ‘Regional Australia’ or ‘low population growth metropolitan area’
· spouse skills.
Bonus points are available for applicants who satisfy the requirements of one of the following additional categories: ‘Australian work experience’, or ‘Fluency in one of Australia’s community languages’.
Consult your qualified Migration Agent partner through International Education Agency – Australia.
If you don’t meet the above requirements you may be able to apply for the new ‘Skilled – Graduate’ visa (subclass 485).
‘Skilled – Graduate’ visa (subclass 485). temporary visa is designed to give students who have completed at least two years study in Australia but who do not meet the requirements for a permanent GSM visa the opportunity to stay in Australia for up to 18 months to gain the additional skills they need for permanent residency.
The Australian Government skilled migration program targets young people who have skills, an education and outstanding abilities that will contribute to the Australian economy.
International students with Australian qualifications account for about half the people assessed under the skilled migrant program. For up-to-date information on the program, contact the qualified Migration Agent Partners that works with My Study in Australia office in Sydney.
Options for extending your stay
The following table outlines your visa options to extend your stay in Australia. Please take this as an guideline and consult qualified Migration Agent Partners that works with My Study in Australia office in Sydney.

Reasons for further stay

Visa Options

Continue your studies

Apply for a new student visa.
My Study in Australia Student counsellors can assist you.

To have your PhD thesis assessed

Attend your graduation ceremony

Apply for a visitor visa.
Consult a qualified migration agent partner from International Education Agency – Sydney.

Have a holiday

For work, travel or for completing a professional year

If you are successfully completed 2 y, an acceptale F/T study in Australia, you may apply for a work visa, e.g. Skilled – Graduate (Temporary) visa (subclass 485)
This visa allows overseas students who do not meet the criteria for a permanent General Skilled Migration visa to remain in Australia for 18 months to gain skilled work experience or improve their English language skills – two things that may enhance their chances of gaining Skilled Migration.
Holders of this visa may apply for permanent residence at any time if they are able to meet the pass mark on the General Skilled Migration points test.
This visa allows the qualified Graduate and any secondary applicants included in their visa application to remain in Australia for up to 18 months with no restrictions on work or study. During 485 visa holders may:
· travel
· work
· study to improve your English skills
· Complete a professional year.
Please take this as an guideline and consult qualified Migration Agent Partners that works with My Study in Australia office in Sydney.

Permanent residence in Australia

If you are successfully completed 2 y, an acceptable F/T study in Australia, and if you are qualified to apply for Permanent Residency,

Please take this as an guideline and consult qualified Migration Agent Partners that works with My Study in Australia office in Sydney.

PERMANENT RESIDENCY

Many international students who have graduated from Australian institutions apply for Independent Skilled Migration programme through International Education Agency – Australia’s qualified Migration Agent partners. There is a special category for International Students who have studied in Australia.
You may be eligible to apply if you have studied a course that scores 50 or 60 Points on the Skilled Occupation List (SOL). See http://www.immi.gov.au/allforms/pdf/1121i.pdf. To achieve recognition in one of these Skilled Occupations, you need to meet the criteria set down by the relevant Assessing Body.
To find out if your course qualifies you to apply for Permanent Residency, you will need to have your skills assessed by the relevant body, shown beside the occupation on the SOL. The SOL changes from time to time, so there can be no guarantee that if an occupation is on the list when you commence a course that it will still be there when you graduate. The list is based on areas where Australia has skills shortages.
Please contact you’re my Study in Australia Student Counsellor to have up-to-date information on qualified courses.

  • Most Trades – e.g. Hairdressing, Commercial Cook, Pastry Cook, Baker, Greenkeeper, Nurseryman, General Gardener, Automotive mechanic, Electronic Equipment Tradesperson, General Clothing Tradesperson, Dressmaker, Graphic Pre-Print Tradesperson, Aircraft Maintenance Engineer- assessed by TRA may require:
    • AQF Certificate III – CRICOS registered
    • 2 years of study
    • 900 Hours relevant work experience
    • Workplace assessment
  • Associate Professionals
    • e.g. Community Welfare Workers – assessed by AIWCW – require study of an accredited course. See www.aiwcw.org.au
  • Professionals
    • Bachelor degree (3-4 years e.g. Information Technology, Accounting, Nursing, Teaching…) or
    • Post Graduate Diploma or Masters
      • There are a number of programs which are open to graduates of any recognised degree, and set graduates up for recognition as
        • Information Technology Specialists ACS
        • Accounttants-CPA
        • Teaching-TA
        • Nurses

Please seek migration information from a qualified migration agent Partners that works with My Study in Australia office in Sydney.
If you have an overseas qualification that has been assessed as not meeting Australian requirements, please contact our counsellors to find out what courses are available to assist you to gain the recognition needed.

June 29, 2017
In November 2016, reported about Victorian Government’s decision to temporary stop accepting applications for skilled visa for certain ICT occupations.
The Temporary Graduate (subclass 485) visa

Skilled visa applications for 11 occupations were temporarily closed by the Victorian Government for certain ICT occupations from 11 November 2016 till 6 March 2017 which was later revised and extended till 30 June 2017.
The state government has announced that from 1 July 2017, the Victorian Skilled and Business Migration Program will reopen applications for ICT occupations.

New application process for ICT occupations

Due to the high number of ICT applications that Victoria receives, the state government is changing the application process for ICT occupations. The aim of this is to reduce processing times and improve experience.
Those interested in applying for Victorian nomination (in ICT occupations), are advised to follow these steps:
1. Send your resume to [email protected]
we will check you meet the Department of Immigration and Border Protection’s (DIBP) Skilled Nominated visa (subclass 190) requirements and Victoria’s minimum nomination requirements.
Then we will submit an Expression of Interest (EOI) for the Skilled Nominated visa (subclass 190)  in DIBP’s SkillSelect, and indicate your interest for Victorian nomination. You do not need to notify Victoria that you have submitted an EOI.
There is no set timeframe to expect an invitation after submitting an EOI. Invitations are not guaranteed. If selected, an email invitation to apply for Victorian visa nomination will be sent to your email address used for the EOI.
If you receive the invitation. we will submit an online application for Victorian visa nomination within 14 days of receiving the invitation. Note that you must be able to demonstrate that you still meet the claims that were in your EOI when you were invited. It is recommend that you have all your supporting documents ready before you submit your EOI in SkillSelect, as the 14 days cannot be extended.
If you are successfully nominated by the Victorian Government, you will receive a SkillSelect invitation to apply for the Skilled Nominated visa (subclass 190) .
Then we will submit a visa application to DIBP within 60 days of being nominated by Victoria.
Selection considerations
The Victorian Government will review and select the top ranking ICT candidates from SkillSelect, who have indicated Victoria as their preferred state.
Candidates who are selected to apply are still required to meet Victoria’s minimum eligibility requirements, including demonstrating employability and commitment to Victoria, and are not guaranteed nomination.
If you are not selected by the Victorian Government, you will not receive an email. Your EOI will continue to be considered for as long as it remains in DIBP’s SkillSelect system.
Current  Occupations eligible to apply for Victorian visa nomination

Victoria SOL

Victoria SOL

Victoria SOL
Victoria SOL
Victoria SOL
Victoria SOL
Victoria SOL
Victoria SOL
Victoria SOL
Victoria SOL

For more details, visit Victorian Government’s website. [contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]

June 9, 2017
 Five Australian university are among the world’s top 50 universities and 7 are in the top 100, according to a major global ranking that shows Australian universities have made overall improvements in all measures, including teaching, employability and research.
Australian National University is the highest ranked in the country at 20th place in the 2018 QS World University Rankings.
It is followed by the University of Melbourne, ranked at 41, the University of New South Wales at 45, the University of Queensland at 47 and the University of Sydney at 50.
Monash University, with a rank of 60, and the University of Western Australia at 93 round out the seven Australian universities in the top 100.

An institution’s rank is determined by its academic and employer reputations, student-to-faculty ratio, citations per faculty, and international faculty and student ratios.
A total of 37 Australian Government universities are included in this year’s ranking, which covers 959 universities around the world and measures performance in research, teaching, employability and internationalisation.

Belinda Robinson, chief executive of peak sector body Universities Australia, said the ranking is especially important to international students choosing a university.
“Global rankings are a major factor for many international students in deciding where to study, so they’re also very important to the $22.4 billion a year that international students bring into Australia’s economy,” Ms Robinson said.

“These impressive rises underscore the global competitiveness of Australia’s universities and the excellent quality of our education and research on the world stage.”

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is the top ranked university in the world for the sixth consecutive year, followed by Stanford University, Harvard University, the California Institute of Technology, the University of Cambridge, the University of Oxford, University College London, Imperial College London, the University of Chicago and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology.

MIT has been described as “the nucleus of an unrivalled innovation ecosystem” by QS Quacquarelli Symonds, the education analysis firm behind the ranking, which notes that companies created by the university’s alumni have a combined revenue of $2 trillion, the equivalent of the world’s 11th largest economy.
Research director at QS Quacquarelli Symonds, Ben Sowter, said the improved ranking of Australian universities can be partially attributed to the changing political climate in countries such as the US and UK increasing Australia’s comparative popularity.

“Higher internationalisation scores certainly reflect coherent international outreach efforts made by university marketing departments,” Mr Sowter said. “However, they also reflect the increased desirability of Australian higher education in the light of current political situations in the United States and United Kingdom – typically Australia’s main Anglosphere competitors.
“Improvements in scores for Academic Reputation can be attributed to both the type of teaching innovations … and the standard of research emanating from Australia’s universities.”

 
 
Source: smh.com.au

May 29, 2017

MARA Code of Conduct

The MARA (The Migration Agent Registration Authority ) Code of Conduct for registered migration agents is set out in legislation to regulate the conduct of registered migration agents. It prescribes registered migration agents’ obligations towards your clients.
Provision for a Code of Conduct for migration agents is set out in Section 314 of the Migration Act 1958 and is prescribed in Schedule 2, Regulation 8 of the Migration Agents Regulations 1998.
Code of Conduct for registered migration agents (419KB PDF)
Feriha Güney has number of years of experıence as Education Consultant Badge thumb QEAC C102 and registered Migration Agent (MARN 0960690)

January 2, 2017

Usually Education agents assist international students to secure a place in an Australian school. While institutions can enrol students directly, they also work with the global student agent network such as IEA-A International Network. You may choose to use a qualified education agent, usually known as a student counsellor, academic adviser, or student recruiter in your home country, or one based in Australia, to guide you through the process of choosing a school and enrolling.
Also based on your home country, your education agent with deep knowledge of Australian visa system, will manage your student visa application that could be critical for getting your student visa successfully. IEA-A has Australian office and in your local country so our services start in your country and continue in Australia.
Why you need a Qualified Education Agent Counsellor ? 
Education agents help reduce the stress of choosing a school in another country. Understanding your options, with someone who speaks your language, can be very reassuring. It is important through that that your agent is knowledgeable, up-to-date on student visa and curriculum changes, and has your best interest at heart. We hear stories of students who arrive for their first day of class to find out that the school has never heard of them. The education agent industry can attract unethical people, so do your research to make sure you are working with a good agent!
In this section, we provide guidance on using agents. Our qualified principal Migration Agent and education councillor Mrs. Feriha Guney (Qualified Education Agent Counsellors QEAC number: C102). (Migration Agent – MARN:0960690) is one of the industry expert with over 15 years of experience and thousands of satisfied international student, can assist you herself or with a number of education counsellors or migration Agents/Lawyer work with her. 
Some of the benefits of using a qualified education agent 
If you agent is not qualified or experienced could cost you not only your visa fee or time but also he/she can damage your education career and even may change your life. On the other hand a qualified and experienced education agent, coudl help you to build your education career and even after a successful life, by doing:

  • conduct an interview to understand your needs and goals
  • make suggestions for the best institutions and programs to help you reach your goals
  • assist you to collect all of the documents you will need for your application
  • guide you through the application process
  • review your statement of purpose and provide information on interview process
  • guide you through the visa process once you have been accepted by an institution
  • help you prepare for the move and your arrival in Australia
  • organisation of airport pick-up and accommodation
  • provide information on how to find job in Australia and regulations
  • provide information on how to get Australian Tax number if you want to work
  • provide information on how to open bank account
  • provide information on how to get Australian Mobile Phone services
  • provide information on how to extend / change your visa while you are studying (may require additional fee)
  • provide information on how on Graduate work visa after your graduation of apply   (may require additional fee)
  • provide information on how to apply a permanent skill visa

Education agents fees
When working with an agent, is very important to understand how the agent makes money. You will find that most experienced and qualified education agents offer their services for understanding your education career, checking your “statement of purpose” as well as preparation for the interview, finding right school for your education purpose, helping you to have school acceptance, counselling and the enrolment process fee which it depends of the country of application (as requirements for each country is different). 
Although some inexperienced agent may offer their services free of charge, you should question their qualification and experiences that may cost your education career or even change your life forever. In addition to that you may or may not be charged for any school application fees that arise such as the school assessment (the schools charge the agent for this service). You will also be charged for the visa application fee which is paid to the government of Australia.
If you are applying in Australia, IEA-A usually will not charge you a fee. However if you are applying from overseas and if your home country considered in a risky country, there yoru application need to be prepared professionally and reviewed by expert before making application, so we may charge you an application fee.
Best Agent location – in your home country or in Australia or in both?
Should you use an agent in your country, or one based in Australia? There are benefits and drawbacks to each options.
IEA-A usually offer both location support, in your home country for visa application and assessing your application according to your home country requirements, in Australia for on-going help and support. This way you have benefit of Using an education agent based in your country,  you are dealing with somebody who is local and understand your education system.
Education Counsellor in your home country should also be very knowledgeable about visas for nationals of your country. The interview process can take place over the phone or face to face in your native language, and all the paperwork and applications can be processed locally.  
When an education agent located in Australia, you have representation when you arrive, and can expect very good relationships with, and knowledge about, Australian education providers. Your agent can assist with airport pickup, accommodation, and in some cases even help you to understand how you can get a job while you are studying.
How do I know if an agent is knowledgeable?
The migration agent system is regulated by the Australian government. Registered migration agents can counsel on migration visas, student visas, or both. If you are working with a migration agent who is also a student agent, we suggest you use one who is registered with the Office of the MARA to ensure they are up-to-date on visa rules. In addition, you can also find out whether a night and overseas agent has been banned from working in migration.
Although it is not mandatory, the Qualified Education Agent Counsellors qualification managed by  the PIER Education Agent Training, ensures an agent understands student visas and regulation, especially if you are working with an education agent in your country. The qualification is not mandatory currently, but it can be a good indication of the quality of the agent. See if your agent has right qualification.  
All IEAA Education counsellors and migration Agents have required qualifications and lead by our principal Director Ms. Feriha Guney who has both qualification as Registered Migration Agent and Education Agent  (Mrs. Feriha Guney (Qualified Education Agent Counsellors QEAC number: C102). (Migration Agent – MARN:0960690 ) and over 15 years of experience on both fields.  
If you want to check your eligibility as a student visa o study ion Australia, send your resume and write to us on [email protected]

Enter your email to get instant access to the Document

    Your information is 100% secure with us

    Enter your email to get instant access to the webinar recording

      Your information is 100% secure with us