October 13, 2021

A doubling of that pre-pandemic rate would see net migration leap to more than 400,000 a year, a staggering surge that would see the population swell by 2 million by 2026.

Australia needs an explosive post-World War II-style immigration surge that could bring in 2 million people over five years to rebuild the economy and address worsening labour shortages, according to NSW government advice to new Premier Dominic Perrottet.

Top bureaucrats last week urged Mr Perrottet to seize the national leadership initiative by pushing a “national dialogue on an aggressive resumption of immigration levels as a key means of economic recovery and post-pandemic growth”.

“An ambitious national immigration plan similar to Australia’s post-World War II approach would ensure Australia would benefit from skills, investment and population growth,” Mr Perrottet was told in the advice, which was seen by The Australian Financial Review.

The top-secret, politically sensitive document was prepared by the NSW government’s top mandarins as part of an incoming premier’s brief put together by the Department of Premier and Cabinet. It is understood the advice was delivered to his desk when he took up the job last week.

In a sign the new Premier is taking the advice seriously, Mr Perrottet on Monday said the borders need to be opened up amid a “general labour” shortage to ensure a healthy economic recovery.

An incoming premier brief from top bureaucrats within the NSW Department of Premier and Cabinet have told Premier Dominic Perrottet that Australia needs an explosive surge of 2 million migrants to boost the economy:

Top bureaucrats last week urged Mr Perrottet to seize the national leadership initiative by pushing a “national dialogue on an aggressive resumption of immigration levels as a key means of economic recovery and post-pandemic growth”.

“An ambitious national immigration plan similar to Australia’s post-World War II approach would ensure Australia would benefit from skills, investment and population growth,” Mr Perrottet was told in the advice, which was seen by The Australian Financial Review.

“If we lose this opportunity, those skilled migrants will go to other countries,” he said. “We won’t get those engineers, those accountants, they’ll commit to other projects.”

Mr Perrottet is pushing to end NSW’s 14-day hotel quarantine system and replace it with a shorter period of home-based isolation, and is also revisiting inbound passenger caps.

“We need to get away from that formal beds quarantine system and to something that’s more suitable to bring people in and out of this country on a more fluid basis.

“I think by next year we’ll see a very different sort of immigration policy, and I hope we’ll start to see more people coming in and filling those jobs.”

‘Shameless’ push for skilled migration

The top bureaucrats told Mr Perrottet that NSW under his predecessor Gladys Berejiklian has played a “proactive role” in pushing for the reopening of the Australian economy, and was joined in recent weeks by Victoria and the Commonwealth “pushing a position focused on living with COVID-19″.

They also took a swipe at premiers and chief ministers of Queensland, Tasmania, Western Australia and the ACT, whose attitudes they described as “resistant”.

“It is highly likely that NSW will reopen its international borders ahead of other states/territories and in the absence of any national agreement.”

Mr Perrottet was told that a “time-limited” immigration surge could include a “doubling” of pre-COVID immigration levels for the next five years and “unashamedly” focusing on “the skilled migration we need to develop key industry sectors”.

Population growth since the pandemic has collapsed after federal and state governments unwittingly embarked on one of the most wide-reaching post-war policy experiments ever conducted by closing off immigration, a mainstay driver of jobs and economic activity in Australia for decades.

Net overseas migration added 194,400 people to Australia’s population in the year ending June 2020, a sharp drop from the 241,000 reached in 2018-19.

Net migration leap to more than 400,000 a year

A doubling of that pre-pandemic rate would see net migration leap to more than 400,000 a year, a staggering surge that would see the population swell by 2 million by 2026.

“There is a need to return to higher levels of migration across the board, both in terms of skilled migration and being more generous to people coming in under specialist humanitarian visas and, indeed, international students returning on temporary visas,” said Peter Shergold, chancellor of Western Sydney University and the Commonwealth’s former top bureaucrat.

“These things are very important to the economic future of NSW.”

Source : afr.com

October 11, 2021

Australia’s education minister Alan Tudge, has pledged a rapid increase in international students returning next year with hopes tens of thousands could be welcomed.

Alan Tudge on Friday told an international education conference the federal government was considering ways to rapidly expedite the return of students.

“Looking into next year, my expectation is that we will have very significant numbers coming in,” he said.

“I cannot put a figure on that just yet, but my hope would be that tens of thousands can return.”

Mr Tudge said limits would apply in the short-term but he remained hopeful caps would be scrapped to allow demand to drive student numbers rather than available places.

“When that occurs, I am confident that students will return in significant numbers.”

Australia will restart international travel from November with citizens and permanent residents the first priority for arrivals and departures.

Skilled migrants and students from overseas are expected to be next, ahead of tourists.

“These are all very promising and they are happening this year,” Mr Tudge said.

The education minister also wants a greater diversity of students entering Australia, which has largely relied on five countries but particularly China and India.

Mr Tudge said a concentrated market had financial risks and could also diminish local and overseas students’ experience.

“Some universities have responded to this through limits on international students and limits on proportion of students from any one country,” he said.

“We would obviously like to see universities themselves taking the lead on this, but we are also thinking deeply about policies to help facilitate this.”

He said a greater diversity of courses for international students should be more closely aligned with Australia’s skill needs so more people could become long-term residents.

International students to return to NSW from December 2021

NSW is expected to have around 500 international students return in December, while details around a South Australian plan are also being finalised.

From December 2021, a small, but increasing number of international students enrolled with New South Wales (NSW) education providers will have the opportunity to return to Australia to continue their studies on campus.

Under the pilot returns program, 500 students will return to the Australian state this year as part of the Australian Government-approved New South Wales International Student Arrivals Pilot Plan.

The plan sees 250 fully vaccinated students allowed to return to Australia in the first two weeks of December, followed by another 250 students in the second two weeks of that month.

Participating students must be fully-vaccinated with a COVID-19 vaccination recognised by Australia’s Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) before they arrive in Sydney, and will be required to quarantine in purpose-built student accommodation in Sydney (regardless of which education provider they are enrolled with).

The selection of students for return to Australia, and the funding of the pilot program, will be managed and run by the New South Wales tertiary sector.

“This is an important milestone for NSW and reinforces the State’s standing as a world-leading study destination, especially for any international student considering NSW as the next place to learn and live in their education journey,” the announcement from Study NSW says.

The success of the pilot program will determine the next steps regarding its future expansion, which could involve school students by that stage.

The Australian Government continues to work closely with all of Australia’s states and territories on further development of student return and arrival plans.

International students could return to Victoria by the end of 2021

Here’s the latest news in Australia for international students — hundreds could return to Victorian universities by the end of the year.

In the latest news in Australia for students, hundreds of international students could reportedly return to Victoria by the end of the year following the state government’s approval of a plan to revive the 14 billion Australian dollar international education sector that has been badly affected by COVID-19.

Quoting a senior government source, The Age said 120 international students could be permitted to arrive in Victoria per week. Universities could cover the hotel quarantine costs under a plan to be sent to the Commonwealth for approval by the end of the week.

July 19, 2021

Every year, all States receive quotas from the government, based on which the states and territories nominate skilled and business migrants for the Skilled Nom­inated visa Subclass 190 and the Skilled Work Regional (Provisional) visa Subclass 491.

Australian states received allocations for their Skilled Migration Program designed to attract migrants.

Just like last year, the program will continue to respond to the challenges posed by COVID-19, with a strong focus on onshore applicants who can assist the jurisdictions in their post-pandemic economic recovery.

Australian states received allocations for their Skilled Migration Program designed to attract migrants. The General Skilled Migration Program (GSM) is aimed at attracting skilled workers to critical occupations who are ­­willing to migrate to Australia and improve the country’s workforce and meet the changing needs of businesses in its states and territories. ­

Here’s a state-wise update for the program year 2021-22:

New South Wales

New South Wales continues to be the state with the highest number of allocations for its skilled nomination program. It has received 4,000 places for Subclass 190 and 3,640 for Subclass 491, a significant increase from last year’s total which stood at 6,350.

Australian Capital Territory

The ACT has received 600 more places for its skilled nomination program this year as compared to the last.

Its skilled migration program remains closed to offshore applicants until the federal government reopens the international borders.

Victoria

Victoria has received a total of 4,000 places this year – 3,500 for Subclass 190 and 500 Subclass 491. This is marginally more than the previous program year.

However, this year, Victoria will focus on onshore applicants who are currently living and working in the state in one of the seven target sectors designated by the state based on their STEMM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics and medical) skills.

The seven target sectors include health, medical research, life sciences, digital, agri-food, advanced manufacturing and new energy, emission reduction and circular economy.

GSM

Western Australia

Priority will be given to those using their critical skills in Melbourne’s business precincts, namely, Parkville, Footscray and Docklands.

The General Stream of Skilled Migration in Western Australia is divided into two categories based on occupations: the WA Skilled Migration Occupation List (WASMOL) Schedule 1 and Schedule 2.

For more information about the requirements for WASMOL Schedule 1 and 2.

The state has expanded its occupation lists, but Mr Singh said the most noticeable change in the program is that applicants who apply for General Stream, do not have to be currently studying, working or living in the state to receive a nomination.

All they need is a job offer in the state to be eligible for this stream.

“The WA state nomination is unique and positive as it is open to applicants throughout Australia rather than limiting it to the state. Also, WA’s skilled occupation list is quite liberal with opportunities for trades like motor mechanic, chef, cook and painter. Applicants specifically from Victoria and Queensland will benefit from WA’s state nomination since the options for these occupations are limited in these states,” Mr Singh said.

The state has received 1,100 places for Subclass 190 and 340 for Subclass 491.

State and Territory nominated visa allocations for 2021-2022.

Department of Home Affairs

South Australia

South Australia’s skilled nomination program has received 2,600 places each for subclasses 190 and 491, a total of 1,200 more places than last year.

Mr Singh said the increased allocation would mean applicants will have more chances to secure a nomination.

“The number of allocations is quite promising as they stand at 5,200 spots for the 491 and 190 visas combined, and are only second to NSW. SA is unique in a way that unlike states like Victoria, it didn’t restrict invitations to critical occupations and the trend is likely to continue this financial year as well,” Mr Singh added.

The state’s general skilled migration program is scheduled to reopen on 20 July.

Queensland

Queensland has received the same number of places as the previous year – 1,000 for Subclass 190 and 1,250 for Subclass 491.

The state is currently finalising the criteria for its skilled nomination program, which is scheduled to open in late July.

Tasmania

Tasmania has received 1,100 places for Subclass 190 and 2,200 for Subclass 491, slightly more than last year.

The state will continue to assess applications for the Skilled Nom­inated visa in this program year which were not finalised by 30 June.

The Skilled Work Regional (Provisional) visa applications lodged before 20 March, which were not finalised in the last financial year, will also continue to be assessed in the current year.

The state is yet to open its nomination program for 2021-22.

Northern Territory

The Australian jurisdiction with the smallest skilled nominated program has been allocated 1,000 places, 500 each for Subclass 190 and Subclass 491, the same as the previous year.

While the NT program remains open for new onshore applicants, it is closed to overseas applicants. However, all existing applications will be assessed.

Disclaimer: This content is for general information purposes only and should not be used as a professional consultation by a qulaified migration agent. Contact us Registered Migration Agents to review your situation.

March 24, 2021

Prime Minister Scott Morrison and his Party now acknowledge that migration is crucial to economic growth and prosperity.

AFTER TELLING temporary entrants to “return to their home country” at the beginning of Covid19 pandame, just 12 months ago and cutting the Migration Program ceiling by 30,000 per annum to “bust congestion” as part of his 2019 pre-election plan, Australia’s Prime Minister Scott Morrison now says we must overhaul temporary migration in the post-COVID era to fill rapidly emerging skill shortages.

Recently the Minister for Immigration Alex Hawke said that:

“Convinced that the migration program will be a huge part of how we recover from COVID.”

Treasurer Josh Frydenberg says Australia has the “opportunity to attract some of the most skilled and highly qualified individuals from across the world”.


And with no reference to the Prime Minister telling temporary entrants to go home or cutting immigration to “bust congestion”, Chair of the Joint Standing Committee on Migration, Julian Leeser, said:

“Australia needs to replace the skilled migrants that left our shores as a result of the pandemic. Without the return of skilled migration, Australia’s economic recovery will be severely hampered and it will be harder to create more jobs for Australians.”

Why Australia is changing its immigration policy? No one believes congestion has been “busted” by the recent lockdowns or that cutting the migration program by 30,000 per annum would have busted congestion. That was just Scott Morrison making up a rationale for Dutton’s earlier cut to the program, as well as a bit of convenient dog-whistling.

And if immigration is to now be increased, how will that be done? There is great potential for the Government to make a mess of this, especially if done at the same time as the Department of Home Affairs is implementing a major IT upgrade. 

There are likely five main drivers for why the Morrison Government is proposing to increase immigration:

  • Ongoing employer anger at the changes Peter Dutton made in 2017-18 to employer-sponsored migration;
  • Recommendations of the Royal Commission on Aged Care will require a very substantial increase in the number of qualified aged and health care staff to bring aged care delivery to the proposed standard and to meet the increasing demands of a much larger aged care population. This increase cannot possibly be delivered solely by training more Australians;
  • Pressure from the agricultural and international tourism industries to address their workforce and related challenges;
  • Pressure from universities due to the number of university staff who have lost their jobs following a sharp fall in revenue from overseas students and the Government’s decision to not grant universities access to JobKeeper; and
  • Likely advice from Treasury that further ageing of Australia’s population over the next 10-20 years will make high rates of real economic growth impossible to deliver.

Employer-sponsored migration

Employer-sponsored skilled temporary entry visas declined significantly after the Global Financial Crisis (GFC) and then made a remarkable recovery as the stimulus into the Australian economy rapidly reduced unemployment.

The rise in unemployment from 2014 again resulted in a fall in skilled temporary visas. That decline continued as changes to this visa introduced by Peter Dutton plus a slowing in visa processing saw a large decline in 2017-18. While there was a short recovery in 2018-19, that was due to backlog clearance rather than an increase in applications. The decline continued in 2019-20 and there is likely to be a further fall in 2020-21 due to COVID.

Source: data.gov.au.

While he will not say so, the recommendations of Julian Leeser’s Committee are designed to undo many of the changes Peter Dutton made in 2017-18. But is that the most sensible way forward?

I managed Australia’s migration and temporary entry arrangements for over a decade and can attest that employers seeking to fill a genuine skill shortage are mainly interested in speed, flexibility and certainty.

They don’t want to be messed about by the kinds of bureaucratic delays Peter Dutton specialised in when they need to fill a key vacancy.

From a public policy perspective, the key risks employer-sponsored skilled visa design must address are:

  • Employer-sponsored visas being used to undercut job opportunities of Australians, especially for entry-level job vacancies given high youth unemployment amongst Australians without post-school qualifications;
  • Use of employer-sponsored visas to suppress wages and exploit overseas workers; and
  • Sponsoring employers avoiding their obligations to train Australians.

In this context, it is extraordinary that Leeser ignores the most important policy lever available. That is the minimum salary that every sponsor of a skilled temporary entrant must pay. An appropriately set minimum salary, with minimal scope to use “in-kind” non-cash benefits, effective enforcement and severe penalties for non-compliance, is by far the most effective way to minimise the key risks of skilled temporary entry.

From the checks I have been able to make, it seems the minimum salary requirement for skilled temporary entry may not have been substantially increased since 2013. If that is correct, we can only conclude that skilled temporary entry has been part of the Government’s agenda, as explained by former Finance Minister Mathias Cormann, to slow wages growth in Australia.

If the Government wants to overhaul skilled temporary entry to deliver the speed and flexibility employers desire, it must strengthen the minimum salary requirement, with an appropriate concession for employers in regional Australia.

If not, it will risk, for example, the large corporate aged care providers in Australia using skilled temporary entry to undermine the recommendations of the Royal Commission on Aged Care which wants to increase the qualifications and wages of aged care workers rather than to have them continue to be exploited.

To secure the large numbers of more qualified health and aged care workers that Australia will need, Australia will need to source many of these workers through the overseas students’ program. Attracting sufficiently qualified health and aged care workers directly from overseas will be difficult as countries in Europe, Japan and North America will be competing for the same workers.

In this regard, Leeser is right to propose more sensible pathways to permanent residence for overseas students and other temporary entrants. These are the same pathways Dutton made a mess of in 2017-18. For regional Australia, where the demand for qualified health and aged care workers will hit earlier and harder, the Government will also need to revisit the Regional Employer-Sponsored category that Morrison announced with his 2019 Population Plan.

Predictably, that category has turned out to be a total lemon.

Universities will need to switch the focus of their overseas student programs towards health and aged care, and away from the traditional focus on accounting and business. But at a time university finances are heavily stretched, that will be difficult.

The Government will need to assist universities to make the transition to health and aged care training for both domestic and overseas students.

Agriculture and international tourism industries

Both of these industries are pressing the Government for assistance with their labour needs.

Working holidaymakers and work and holiday visa holders have been a traditional source of labour used by these industries. But the number of these visa holders had been in steady decline well before COVID-19 hit, from a peak of around 180,000 in December 2013 to around 140,000 in December 2019, and less than 50,000 in December 2020 and continuing to fall fast.

This is despite a significant expansion in the number of countries with which Australia has a work and holiday agreement as well as expanded opportunities for these visa holders to secure further stay in Australia.

The decline prior to COVID is likely the result of extensive media and social media reports of exploitation of these visa holders, as well as the special “backpacker tax” that has been in place in recent years. Since COVID, with few arriving and large numbers leaving, it was inevitable their numbers would fall sharply.

Source: WHM ReportsDHA website.

The Seasonal Worker Programme has, to a small degree, offset the decline in working holidaymakers. However, this scheme has also been plagued by reports of exploitation and abuse, including an extraordinary 22 deaths of people while in Australia on this very small visa as well as serious complaints from some Pacific Island Governments.

Despite the risks of exploitation, the Government has steadily reduced regulations around this visa and shifted the cost burden from employers and labour-hire companies to workers. The farm lobby wants further deregulation and the creation of a U.S.-style agricultural visa, which has often been described as a new form of slavery.

source: independentaustralia.net

October 7, 2020


For most of us, the key question what is in news for migrants on Australian 2020 Budget announcement.

Treasurer Josh Frydenberg has declared that the planning figure for the Migration Program will remain unchanged, as the country strives to recover from the economic blow delivered by the COVID-19 pandemic. The Morrison Government has announced it will maintain the planned ceiling for the 2020-21 Migration Program at 160,000 places.

In a noticeable departure from the traditional migration composition, the government has placed greater emphasis on family stream visas, raising the planning level from 47,732 to 77,300 places on a ‘one-off basis’ for this program year.

“While overall the government has placed greater emphasis on the family stream, most of these are people already in Australia,” the Acting Minister for Immigration Alan Tudge said in a joint media release with Minister for Home Affairs, Peter Dutton.

Australian Immigration Update with Budget 2020

Keypoints:

Onshore applicants and partner visa applicants will be given priority
Government triples allocation for Global Talent Independent Program- fastest way to get permanent residency in Australia

Family stream: Overall the government will sharpen the focus on the family stream, predominately made up of partner visa category, which has been allocated a total of 72,300 places.

According to the Department of Home Affairs, global waiting times for offshore partner visa to be processed has risen to almost two years.
Budget papers also reveal that an English language requirement will also be introduced for partner visas and their permanent resident sponsors.

This could be an indication of the government’s intention to clear the massive partner visa application backlog that currently sits at 100,000, it could also mean a significant cut for places in the parent category.

In terms of partner visa, Australia’s partner visa processing times blow out due to COVID-19. Budget papers also reveal that an English language requirement will also be introduced for partner visas and their permanent resident sponsors.

These changes will help support English language acquisition and enhance social cohesion and economic participation outcomes

The government also will be prioritising onshore visa applicants and partner visa applicants where the relevant sponsor resides in a designated regional area. While the focus on onshore applications was expected, the fact that partner visa applicants with sponsors in regional areas will get priority is quite a pleasant surprise.

Skilled Migration
Priority will be given to Employer Sponsored, Global Talent, Business Innovation and Investment Program visas within the skilled stream.

Skilled stream: The budget papers reveal that the government will give priority to Employer-Sponsored, Global Talent, Business Innovation and Investment Program visas within the Skilled Stream.

Australian Visa
‘This is the fastest way to get permanent residency in Australia’
As per the planning levels, the government has tripled the allocation of the Global Talent Independent (GTI) program to 15,000 places, a massive increase from the previous program year’s planning level where the government had set an objective to grant 5,000 visas.


The nominations for GTI applicants in the information and communication technology (ICT) sector has a quite a significant increase for the fledgling program that is currently in its second year. The GTI program seems to be growing, and ACS is increasingly seeing evidence of a significant pool of candidates. It nevertheless remains to be seen whether such growth can be realised,

In addition, the government has also raised the allocation for the Business Innovation and Investment Program (BIIP) to 13,500 places.

The Budget papers said “From 1 July 2021, the Government will streamline and improve the operation of the Business Innovation and Investment Program (BIIP). The Government will introduce changes to improve the quality of investments and applicants”.

The immigration number fall for 2020-21: The 2020 budget estimates reveal that Australia will suffer its first negative net overseas migration since the Second World War in a major blow to the country’s economy already bruised by the pandemic.

Net migration numbers are expected to fall from 154,000 in the 2019-20 financial year to a net loss of 72,000 in 2020-21 and 21,600 in 2021-22.

International students in Australia.
The Government will also offer Visa Application Charge (VAC) refunds, waivers or visa extensions to visa holders who have been unable to travel to Australia due to COVID-19.

This includes waiving the VAC for Working Holiday Makers and Visitors to boost tourism once the borders re-open.

March 25, 2020

As you will be aware, Australia has introduced health and safety measures and travel restrictions to prevent the spread of the novel Coronavirus.

Confirmed cases by local health district (LHD) Across NSW – 25 March 2020

We understand this may be confusing if you’re commencing your studies, so read the below information to find out if you are impacted by the changes, and where you can go for support.

Will I be impacted?

Anyone hoping to travel to and from Australia will be impacted by the recent changes as the Australian Government announced that:

  • A travel ban will be placed on all non-residents and non-Australian citizens coming to Australia, effective from 9pm on Friday, 20 March 2020
  • all Australian and residents will be able to return and are required to self-isolate for 14 days
  • all Australians are advised to not travel overseas at this time. This is the highest advice level (level 4 of 4).

Information about Coronavirus is updated regularly, so it’s important to keep up to date with latest news from Australia.

For the latest information about the Coronavirus in Australia, visit these websites:

International students in Australia

All travellers to Australia from midnight, 15 March 2020 are required to self-isolate for 14 days. Self-isolating means you’re required to stay in your local accommodation. 

You’ll need to avoid going out into public spaces such as restaurants, supermarkets, workplaces, universities and any other public places that you will come into contact with people. Additionally, avoid receiving visitors into your home or local accommodation.

If you need more information on self-isolation, get more details by downloading  the Isolation Guidance information sheet from the Department of Health website. If you need to use public transport (e.g. taxis, ride-hail services, train, buses and trams.), kindly follow the precautions listed in the public transport guide.

If you’re starting your studies during the time you’re required to self-isolate, contact your school or university to discuss your study options. Many universities have put in place measures to assist students who are required to self-isolate, such as delayed semester starts or online study options.

If you, or any friends and family start showing flu-like symptoms such as a cough, fever, sore throat or shortness of breath, it is important to contact your local doctor. You can also monitor your symptoms using the Coronavirus (COVID-19) symptom checker. Call before you visit and explain your symptoms and travel history to ensure they are prepared to receive you.

If you require immediate and urgent medical attention, you can call 000. Any ambulance and hospital fees will be covered by your Overseas Student Health Cover (OSHC).

These measures are put in place to limit the possibility of spreading the Coronavirus to the general population.

How do I get food and other essentials?

Ask others who are not in isolation to get food and other essentials for you. If you are new to the country and don’t know anyone who can help you, you can order your food and groceries online.

Food delivery and ordering apps

Menulog

Deliveroo

Uber Eats

Happy Cow (vegan and vegetarian)

Open table

Groceries

Coles

Woolworths

Will this impact my university start date?

If you’re enrolled in Semester 1 2020 and unable to begin classes due to the travel bans or the 14-day self-isolation, you’ll need to get in touch with your university or school as soon as possible to discuss your enrolment.

Many Australian universities have delayed their semester start dates or have put in place changes to assist international students who have been impacted by the recent travel bans.

We recommend you contact your university or school as soon as possible to discuss your possible study options or deferring your studies to start at a later date. 

You can also check out the following websites for current advice and information that may assist you:

Curtin University

Federation University

Flinders University

Go8 Universities

Griffith University

La Trobe University

Macquarie University

Monash University

Queensland University of Technology

RMIT

Swinburne University

The Australian National University

The University of Adelaide

The University of Queensland

The University of Western Australia

University of Melbourne 

University of South Australia

University of Sydney

University of Technology Sydney

University of Wollongong

UNSW

Victoria University

Western Sydney University

Changes to student accommodation

If you have arranged for student accomodation and can’t travel into the country, then it’s vital you check in with your student accommodation about your next steps.

Some student accommodation providers may require you to provide additional information or may change or delay your accommodation arrangements.

Where can I go for support?

The outbreak of the novel Coronavirus presents an emotionally challenging situation for many international students. The spread of the virus may be causing you or your friends and family distress or anxiety, especially if you have loved ones in affected areas or have not been able to return home or to Australia because of the recent travel bans. 

The Australian Government have created a dedicated and multi-lingual support service for international students. You can contact them via email or phone 1300 981 621 (8:00 am–8:00 pm AEDST Monday to Friday). 

You can also visit the Australian Government Department of Education website to download the latest information, guides and FAQs for up-to-date general health and enrolment advice, where to access support services, and news on the latest immigration and border protection measures.

You can also access the links below:

Support for International Students affected by the Novel Coronavirus

Novel Coronavirus FAQ for International Students

Changes in international flight arrangements

If you have flight arrangements in place, your plans may be affected by travel bans or cancelled flights.

Many major airlines and countries are cancelling flights or restricting entry. If you have overseas travel plans, it’s important to regularly check your airline’s website or contact the airline directly for next steps and travel options at a later date.

Changes to IELTS testing

There are currently changes being made to IELTS testing. Visit the IELTS website to find out if the changes will affect you.

January 19, 2019
Skill Select Update

Good news for our clients; in the last skill select invitation round (being 11 October 2018) the number of invitations issued for the subclass 189 visa more than tripled. The total number of invitations went up from 2,490 to 4,340. That’s a significant 74% increase.

The point score cut-off remains 70, with the number of invitations sent out to those who claimed 70 points more than tripling from 605 to 1,903.

More good news for our clients in IT sector; the points required for “Software and Applications Programmers” and “Computer Network Professionals” dropped from 75 to 70 points.

The other capped occupation groups remain unchanged, with points required for Accountants and Auditors remaining at 80. This shows the high calibre of applicants in these occupations, many of whom have superior English skills and have completed a period of education in Australia.

Points required for Electronics, Mechanical, Industrial & Production engineers remains stable at 70. Points required for Environmental Engineers remains at 75 with Civil & Electrical Engineer occupations remaining uncapped.

Our clients on 70 points are receiving invitations, however, you can still expect to wait approximately 3 months. For our clients on fewer points, or who wish to obtain a faster invitation, state sponsorship still remains the best option.

There are currently many opportunities for potential immigrants in the general skilled migration program. Consulting and working with a qualified MARA migration agent will ensure that you receive the most up-to-date, professional and timely information, and that your application will be handled in accordance with best practice.

To enquire about a migration assessment, or if you have any questions, please feel free to contact MARA licensed migration agent Feriha Güney (MARN 0960690) or Australian Lawyer (NSW) Ceren Güney on +90 546 946 38 11 / +61 2 9232 7055 / +61 477 524 039. Alternatively, please feel free to email us at [email protected]

January 19, 2019

AUSTRALIAN PERMANENT RESIDENCY in NORTHERN TERRİTORY

Over the next five years, low skilled migrants with limited English will have the option to apply for permanent residency after living and working in the Northern Territory for at least three years.

From cooks to family day care workers to motor mechanics, low skilled migrants will now be able to apply for Australia’s permanent residency.

Northern Territory has opened its door to skilled migrants in 117 occupations and has offered a pathway to permanent residency to these workers who are willing to work and live in the region for at least three years.

In a bid to distribute the migrant population outside Australia’s major cities such as Sydney and Melbourne, the Australian government has designed a new scheme to attract migrants to regional areas across the country.

The scheme – known as the Designation Area Migration Agreements (DAMA)s has been announced for two regions in Australia – Warrnambool region in Victoria and the Northern Territory which are experiencing labour shortages and need a population boost.

The second-such agreement for NT, this time with a pathway to permanent residency, DAMA II came into effect on January 1st 2019.

NT DAMA II Occupation List

Occupations
Accountant (General)
Accounts Clerk
Aeroplane Pilot
Aged or Disabled Carer
Agricultural and Horticultural Mobile Plant Operator
Airconditioning and Refrigeration Mechanic
Aircraft Maintenance Engineer (Avionics)
Aircraft Maintenance Engineer (Mechanical)
Aquaculture Farmer
Arborist
Automotive Electrician
Baker
Bar Attendant Supervisor
Barista
Beauty Therapist
Beef Cattle Farmer
Bookkeeper
Bus Driver
Butcher or Smallgoods Maker
Cabinetmaker
Cabler (Data and Telecommunications)
Cafe or Restaurant Manager
Carpenter
Chef
Chief Executive or Managing Director
Child Care Centre Manager
Child Care Worker
Civil Engineering Technician
Community Worker
Conference and Event Organiser
Cook
Cook (includes Ethnic Cuisine)
Crowd Controller
Customer Service Manager
Deck Hand
Dental Assistant
Diesel Motor Mechanic
Disabilities Services Officer
Diver
Early Childhood (Pre-primary School) Teacher
Earth Science Technician
Earthmoving Plant Operator (General)
Electrical Linesworker
Electronic Instrument Trades Worker (General)
Excavator Operator
Facilities Manager
Family Day Care Worker
Family Support Worker
Fitter (General)
Fitter and Turner
Fitter-Welder
Floor Finisher
Flying Instructor
Forklift Driver
Fruit or Nut Grower
Gaming Worker
Hair or Beauty Salon Manager
Hairdresser
Hardware Technician
Hotel or Motel Manager
Hotel or Motel Receptionist
Hotel Service Manager
ICT Customer Support Officer
ICT Support Technicians nec
Interpreter
Landscape Gardener
Licensed Club Manager
Linemarker
Management Accountant
Marketing Specialist
Metal Fabricator
Mixed Crop and Livestock Farmer
Mixed Crop Farmer
Mixed Livestock Farmer
Motor Mechanic (General)
Motor Vehicle or Caravan Salesperson
Motor Vehicle Parts and Accessories Fitter (General)
Motor Vehicle Parts Interpreter
Motorcycle Mechanic
Nursing Support Worker
Office Manager
Out of School Hours Care Worker
Panelbeater
Personal Care Assistant
Pharmacy Technician
Plumber (General)
Pressure Welder
Program or Project Administrator
Property Manager
Recreation Officer
Residential Care Worker
Retail Manager (General)
Retail Supervisor
Sales and Marketing Manager
Sheetmetal Trades Worker
Ship’s Engineer
Ship’s Master
Small Engine Mechanic
Sound Technician
Supply and Distribution Manager
Taxation Accountant
Telecommunications Cable Jointer
Telecommunications Linesworker
Telecommunications Technician
Therapy Aide
Tour Guide
Truck Driver (General)
Vegetable Grower
Vehicle Painter
Veterinary Nurse
Waiter Supervisor
Waste Water or Water Plant Operator
Web Administrator
Web Designer
Welder (First Class)
Welfare Worker
Youth Worker

NT Chief Minister Michael Gunner said the addition of the pathway to permanent residency in DAMA II gave skilled migrants a big incentive to move to the NT and stay long-term.

“The Territory Labor Government’s number one priority is jobs for Territorians but we know access to, and retention of, a suitably skilled workforce is a key issue for many employers and there is a need for additional workers, Mr Gunner said.

“We also know that more people moving to the Territory equals more jobs.

“The Territory Labor Government fought hard for the inclusion of the pathway to permanent residency in this new five-year agreement, which we expect to significantly increase the number of skilled migrants moving to the Territory.

“The NT has a long and proud history of migration of overseas nationals and they have been a key contributor to economic growth, population growth and social diversity. This new agreement will help that continue.”

Source: SBS

November 22, 2017

According to the Migration Legislation Amendment Regulations 2017 that came into effect on 18th November 2017, an existing condition, 8303 has been amended to expand its scope. Under the new migration rules, many Australian temporary visas will be subject to a condition that will enable the Immigration Department to cancel a person’s visa if they are found to be involved in online vilification based on gender, sexuality, religion, and ethnicity.
Before 18 November 2017, the condition that earlier applied to only a few visas, is now applicable to most temporary visas applied for on.  This condition now also applies to

  • temporary graduate visa (Subclass 485)
  • skilled regional (485),
  • student visa and
  • visitor visa.

The Immigration Minister now has the power to cancel a visa if there is evidence of a visa holder engaging in harassment, stalking, intimidation, bullying or threatening a person even if it doesn’t amount to a criminal sanction. These activities may include public ‘hate speech’ or online vilification targeted at both groups and individuals based on gender, sexuality, religion, and ethnicity.
The Department of Immigration says that the new change: “It sends a clear message, explicitly requiring that the behaviour of temporary visa holders is consistent with Australian government and community expectations.  It advises visa holders what sorts of behaviour can result in visa cancellation.”
The Immigration Department says its officers have the discretion to determine whether the condition has been breached. They also have the discretion to not cancel the visa even when the condition has been breached.
No one should break the law but even behaviour that may not necessarily warrant a criminal sanction can be deemed a breach of this condition. So it is important to remember that your actions online may have consequences just like your real-life actions.

November 15, 2017

Australian economy is growing exponentially with spectacular economic boom in almost all engineering diciplines but espacially, Civil, Industrial, Mechanical, Mechatronics, and Production engineering sectors. Civil, Industrial, Mechanical, Mechatronics, and Production Engineers with relevant experience are in greater demand in Australia.
Australian Government has opened skilled migration visas for Engineers to reduce the serious shortages of overcome the delay in projects. Civil, Industrial, Mechanical, Mechatronics, and Production Engineers are in great demand in Australia.
The minimum entry requirement for these occupations is a bachelor degree or higher qualification. In some instances relevant experience is required in addition to the formal qualification.
Industrial Engineering Professionals (ANZSCO Skill Level 1) Investigates and reviews the utilisation of personnel, facilities, equipment and materials, current operational processes and established practices, to recommend improvement in the efficiency of operations in a variety of commercial, industrial and production environments. Registration or licensing may be required. Industrial Engineers may have specialization as Process Engineer.
Mechanical Engineering Professionals (ANZSCO Skill Level 1) Plans, designs, organises and oversees the assembly, erection, operation and maintenance of mechanical and process plant and installations. Registration or licensing may be required. Mechanical Engineers may have specialization as an Airconditioning Engineer or Heating and Ventilation Engineer.
Production Engineering Professionals (ANZSCO Skill Level 1) Plans, directs and coordinates the design, construction, modification, continued performance and maintenance of equipment and machines in industrial plants, and the management and planning of manufacturing activities. Production may have specialization as an Automation and Control Engineer.
Required Job Tasks for Civil, Industrial, Mechanical, Mechatronics, and Production Engineers 

  • Studying functional statements, organisational charts and project information to determine functions and responsibilities of workers and work units and to identify areas of duplication „
  • Establishing work measurement programs and analysing work samples to develop standards for labour utilisation „
  • Analysing workforce utilisation, facility layout, operational data and production schedules and costs to determine optimum worker and equipment efficiencies „
  • Designing mechanical equipment, machines, components, products for manufacture, and plant and systems for construction „
  • Developing specifications for manufacture, and determining materials, equipment, piping, material flows, capacities and layout of plant and systems „
  • Organising and managing project labour and the delivery of materials, plant and equipment „
  • Establishing standards and policies for installation, modification, quality control, testing, inspection and maintenance according to engineering principles and safety regulations
  • Inspecting plant to ensure optimum performance is maintained „
  • Directing the maintenance of plant buildings and equipment, and coordinating the requirements for new designs, surveys and maintenance schedules

Immigration to Australia for Civil, Industrial, Mechanical, Mechatronics, and Production Engineers
Industrial, Mechanical, and Production Engineers needs to prepare Competency Demonstration Report (CDR) before applying for Skilled Migration for Australia. Engineers Australia is the designated authority to assess professional and Para-professional qualifications in engineering for the purposes of skilled migration to Australia for most engineering occupations.
Occupational Categories to Assess Engineering Degree from Engineers Australia
Engineers Australia recognises three occupational categories within the engineering team in Australia:

  • Professional Engineer
  • Engineering Technologist
  • Engineering Associate
  • For migration purposes, an additional category of Engineering Manager is also recognised

Recognising Civil, Industrial, Mechanical, Mechatronics, and Production Engineering Qualifications in Australia
To recognise your Engineering qualification in Australia, you need to assess your qualification/ degree through Engineers Australia. There are two pathways to assess your qualifications. If your Engineering Qualification is recognized by Washington AccordDublin Accord or Sydney Accord, then you need not to prepare Competency Demonstration Report (CDR).
In other case you need to write Competency Demonstration Report (CDR) to assess your Engineering degree and finally to apply for Skilled Migration of Australia.
Degree Assessment from Engineers Australia
You need to submit your application with all relevant documents plus assessment fee. Following documents are required to assess your engineering degree through Competency Demonstration Report (CDR) pathway:

  • Application Form available at Engineers Australia‘s website
  • Declarations Page 
  • Three Career Episodes (CEs)
  • CV/ Resume
  • Continual Professional Development (CPD) Report  
  • Summary Statement (SS)
  • IELTS Result
  • Certified Academic Transcripts and Experience Letters

Note: Engineering degree assessment process may take up to 16 weeks from the date of receipt, however the time period keeps varying depending upon the work load.
English Proficiency Test
Minimum English requirement for your Engineering Degree Assessment through Engineers Australia is overall 6.0 band in IELTS or any equivalent English proficiency test (e.g. Cambridge/ TOFEL, etc.). Your band should not be less than 6.0 in any of the four modules; reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Both General Training and Academic version of the IELTS are acceptable.  Applicants who are native English speakers or who have completed an Australian undergraduate engineering qualification, or who have completed a Masters Degree or PhD program at an Australian university may be exempted from IELTS.
Application for Skilled Migration Visa as an Civil, Industrial, Mechanical, Mechatronics, and Production Engineer
Once you have received your positive skill assessment from Engineers Australia, it means that your qualification is recognized in Australia and you are eligible to work as an Engineer in Australia. After getting the positive skill assessment you can apply for your Skilled Migration Visa (Visa Class; 189 or 190 or 489). You are welcome to Australia along with your family after the approval of your visa application. Presently you can apply for your visa through EOI system on Australian Immigration and Border Protection website.
Visa Agency – Australia is helping engineers from all disciplines and particularly Industrial, Civil, Mechanical, and Production Engineers to review their Competency Demonstration Report (CDR). CDR samples are available that will help as a guideline. Competency Demonstration Report (CDR) is the most critical step for getting Australian Skilled Migration and we don’t recommend you to take any risk.

July 14, 2017
Tasmanian state government offer a new visa category that could provide visa-holders a pathway to Australian permanent residency.
Australia is proving to be one of the most popular immigration destinations in the world. With a total annual intake of nearly 200,000, the country evokes the interest of visa-seekers from all over the globe.
Apart from the Skilled Independent visa that allows visa-holders to settle anywhere in Australia, different Australian states and territories have their own immigration programs which are run in accordance with their particular skills and economic requirements, under which the states nominate eligible applicants for skilled migration.
Tasmania, an island state off Australia’s south coast has introduced a new visa category for overseas applicants which will allow them to live and work in the state for four years and also offers a pathway to permanent residency in Australia.

From 1 July this year, a new category for the Skilled Regional (Provisional) visa (Subclass 489) has been introduced for Tasmanian state nomination for overseas applicants. They are eligible to apply for this category as offshore applicants.


Visa subclass 489 allows visa holders to live and work in Tasmania for up to four years.

A state nomination from Tasmania adds 10 points to a skilled visa applicant’s overall score required to qualify for a visa under Australia’s Department of Immigration and Border Protection point test.
After having lived in the state for at least two years and worked full-time (35 hours per week) for at least one year during their stay, visa holders become eligible to apply for permanent residency in Australia.

In order to apply for this visa, an applicant is required to nominate an occupation from Tasmania’s Skilled Occupation List and provide sufficient proof of employment opportunities in the state. Applicants can also secure a genuine offer of employment from employers.
More information send your CV or contact us. 



 

 
 

July 3, 2017

The Short‑term Skilled Occupation List (STSOL) will be applicable for Subclass 190 (Skilled—Nominated visa) or Subclass 489 (Skilled—Regional (Provisional) visa.
The Medium and Long-term Strategic Skills List (MLTSSL) will be applicable for General Skilled migration visas – Subclass 189 (Skilled Independent Visa), Subclass 489 (Skilled Regional Provisional Visa who are not nominated by a State or Territory government agency) and Subclass 485 (Graduate Temporary Visa) visa applications.

November 7, 2016

14702452_1138916749520787_8297787580473740138_nAustralia’s Department of Immigration and Border Protection (DIBP) has released the new Skilled Occupations List (SOL) for 2016-17. The purpose of the country’s skilled migration programme is to attract “highly employable” people for migration, and it is the most common form of migration to Australia.

Australia is one of the biggest gainers through emigration, which is largely accomplished through its “skilled migration programme” which gives preference to skilled foreigners looking to make the country its new home.
The purpose of the country’s skilled migration programme is to attract “highly employable” people for migration, and it is the most common form of migration to Australia.
According to the Department of Immigration and Border Protection (DIBP) new guidelines, these are some of the skills that will give you preference for emigration to Australia.
There are over 185 jobs listed – below is a general overview of the types of skills.

  • Chefs (excluding fast food or takeaway food services)
  • Plumbers
  • Gasfitters
  • Panel beaters
  • Carpenters
  • Fitters and turners
  • Welders
  • Engineers (Chemical, Electrical, Aeronautical, Agricultural and many others)
  • Telecoms (Network planners, Radio technicians, Engineers)
  • Systems Analysts
  • Programmers/Developers
  • Computer Network and Systems Engineers
  • Psychologists
  • Doctors, Surgeons and medical specialists
  • Registered Nurses and Midwives
  • Veterinarians
  • Actuaries, Auditors, Accountants

The Skilled Occupations List (SKO) is used for Skilled Independent Visa, Skilled Regional Provisional Visa and Graduate Temporary Visa applications.
In the same report, the DIBP has also released the Consolidated Sponsored Occupations List (CSO) which is used for Skilled Nominated Visa, Temporary Work Skilled Visa and Employer Nominated Scheme visa applications.
The CSO lists skills that companies in Australia are looking for, and employers or the state will sponsor for emigration into the country.
The full list for both classes can be found here: Australia SKO and CSOLists

August 10, 2016

Fifty two occupations may be removed from Australia’s Skilled Occupation List that identifies occupations for immigration to the country. The SOL is a compilation of occupations for skilled migration for the purpose of meeting the medium to long-term skill needs of the Australian economy.
The 52 occupations that have been flagged on the Skilled Occupation List 2016-17 include health professionals, including specialists, engineers, taxation accountants, barristers, solicitors etc.
The federal health department is pushing to scrap 41 jobs from SOL – including GPs, surgeons and anaesthetists, The Australian has reported.
“Immigration is often used as a short-term demand management strategy and it continues to be poorly co-ordinated,” a Health Department submission into the review of the Skilled Operations List reads.
“Over a longer planning ­horizon, better management of migration pathways for international health professionals must occur in combination with all commonwealth departments”
The move would be counterbalanced by increasing numbers of local medical graduates who could fill vacancies, especially in regional areas.
The Department of Education and Training provides advice to the Minister of Immigration and Border Protection on the composition of the SOL.
The department undertakes the review of the SOL each year following which there are a number of occupations which are ‘flagged’ for possible removal in the future. Generally, occupations are flagged when there is emerging evidence of excess supply in the labour market.
The list of occupations flagged by the Department of Education and Training
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May 19, 2016

Department of Immigration and Border Protection (DIBP) have released the new Skilled Occupations List (SOL) for 2016-17. This list will come into effect from 1st July, 2016.

The Skilled Occupations List is used for

  • 189 (Skilled Independent Visa),
  • 489 (Skilled Regional Provisional Visa) and
  • 485 (Graduate Temporary Visa) visa applications.

The DIBP have also released the Consolidated Sponsored Occupations List (CSOL) which is used for 190 (Skilled Nominated Visa), 457 (Temporary Work Skilled Visa) and 186 (Employer Nominated Scheme) visa applications.
Here’s the new SOL 2016-17
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ContAct us on [email protected] for further information.

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