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November 15, 2013
November 15, 2013

THE NSW government last week issued a warning to international students not to have any dealings with a group purporting to represent their interests.

The Deputy Premier, Andrew Stoner, made public the statement after receiving numerous complaints from universities and legitimate groups about the behaviour of individuals associated with the Overseas Students Association and the National Liaison Committee.

The warning, which was co-signed by 26 peak groups, universities, government departments and cultural outlets, said the group had been using harassing and intimidating behaviour towards members of the legitimate representative group, the Council of International Students Australia.

“CISA has received numerous reports from students who allege they have been harassed and intimidated by OSA representatives,” the warning said.

But its leader, who goes by the name of Master Shang, says that he will make a formal complaint to the NSW Ombudsman and the Australian Human Rights Commission “to make sure Mr Stoner is responsible for his remarks”.

“It’s a direct violation of human rights of international students to organise their own overseas student association on campus,” Mr Shang told the HES.

“We have made a decision to take the government and (University of Technology, Sydney) to the Australian Human Rights Commission for formal complaint.”

The government also warned students not to hand over personal details, including their passport and visa information.

Chin Pok Yap, 23, a Malaysian engineering student from Edith Cowan University, told the HES he was “tricked into joining” the NLC last August.

“They said they were from the government and they declared they were the peak body representing international students,” Mr Yap said.

“I found that the whole group is controlled by Master Shang and he has power over everything. I believe he is after money and power.”

Mr Yap said Mr Shang also tried to get his passport and visa details but when he refused Mr Shang “got very angry”.

“I was not sure what he would do with it, but he got angry when I refused to give it to him.”

When Mr Yap realised the activities of the NLC were not legitimate, he quit three or four months later.

“After I quit, (the NLC) started harassing me and ringing me.

“At first I was a little scared until I contacted my university.

“They threatened to get my visa cancelled and they said I would get in trouble with (the) Immigration (Department).

“I eventually stopped answering their calls.

“They went so far as contacting my sister.

“She didn’t speak to them but they rang her employer and harassed my sister’s boss.”

Mr Shang has now registered the name Council of International Students Australia in NSW.

It’s a similar strategy he used in 2008 when he registered the legitimate, Victorian-based National Liaison Committee in NSW.

“I cannot understand why Andrew Stoner wants to be the public enemy of the Chinese, the Indian, the Muslim and all other multicultural communities in Australia by defaming the NLC,” said NLC national convener ShuYang Sun in a statement.

“Our NLCommunity (sic) contributes $5.5 billion to NSW’s economy; we will decide whether international students come to study in NSW or spend the money elsewhere.”

Mr Stoner’s warning said that the OSA and NLC had been infringing trademark rights by unauthorised use of state governments’ logos on their websites.

In addition, the OSA website “carries false information about discounts” from a range of retailers and cultural outlets to holders of its student safety card. A spokeswoman for Woolworths said the company was attempting to get its logo removed from the website.

Target, Coles and others also said they had no knowledge of the group.

Mr Shang, who became a citizen in 1990, said he was the legitimate representative of Chinese students.

“We are the community. They are my children,” he said.

“The government can have a formal investigation of us to see what we have done wrong.”

Source: JULIE HARE THE AUSTRALIAN

NOVEMBER 13, 2013 

November 8, 2013

What are the requirements to apply for a post study working visa after completing a one year Postgraduate course? What is the fee for this type of visa? What are the criteria for this type of visa, including registration? Do I need to take any exams such as IELTS?

To be eligible for a Post Study Work Visa, you would need to have completed a course or courses taking at least 2 years of study in Australia.

You could potentially use a 1-year postgraduate course as part of the 2-year study requirement, but would need to have completed at least one other qualification taking at least one academic year of study in Australia.

The application fee for a Post Study Work Visa depends on the number of people included in the visa application.

A summary of these is below:

$1·         $ 1,440: Main Applicant

$1·         $ 720: Each spouse or dependent aged 18 or over

$1·         $ 360: Each dependent child aged under 18

Note that a surcharge of $90 applies for each applicant if lodging a paper application rather than an online application.

The main criteria for a Post-Study Work (Subclass 485) Visa are as follows:

$1·         Competent English: Minimum of 6 in each of the 4 bands of IELTS, OET B pass or holder of a UK, US, Ireland, Canada or NZ passport

$1·         Australian Study: You must have completed qualifications taking at least 2 academic years of study in Australia. The studies must be at the bachelor level or higher, and cannot include Graduate Diplomas or Graduate Certificates unless they gave credits towards completion of a Masters or PhD.

$1·         You must lodge your application within 6 months of completion of your Australian studies

$1·         You must have applied for your first student visa after 5 November 2011

Note that you may qualify for the Graduate Work Stream of the 485 visa even if you do not meet the above criteria.

Is bridging visa automatically granted for those who apply for 485 visas?

$1·         A bridging visa is granted providing a valid application for a 485 visa is lodged.

$1·         Where the applicant holds a student visa when they apply for a 485 visa, a Bridging A visa would be granted. This gives full work rights, but ceases if the student leaves Australia. If the student wishes to travel outside Australia during processing of their application, they should apply for a Bridging B visa.

$1·         If the student holds a Bridging Visa when they apply for a 485 visa, a Bridging C visa would be granted. This also gives full work rights, but it is not possible to obtain a Bridging B visa to facilitate travel.

$1·         Will it affect my migration application if I applied for an exemption/advanced standing on some subjects, meaning I did not complete all the subjects in Australia?

$1·         For a student to meet the Australian Study requirement, they must have completed courses taking at least 2 academic years in Australia.

$1·         Two academic years is defined by the regulations as studies taking at least 92 weeks as registered on CRICOS (http://cricos.deewr.gov.au/).

$1o   If academic exemptions have been granted for overseas studies, then the amount of weeks the student is taken to have completed in Australia is reduced. This can result in the student becoming ineligible for a Temporary Graduate visa if too many exemptions are granted.

$1§  For example – a student completes a Master Degree in Australia which normally requires 16 units and is registered for 104 weeks on CRICOS.

$1§  If they obtain 1 unit exemption for overseas studies, they are taken to have completed: 15/16 * 104 = 97.5 weeks of study. This would meet the Australian study requirement as it is over 92 weeks.

$1§  If they obtain 2 units of exemptions, they are taken to have completed 14/16 * 104 = 91 weeks of study, which would not meet the requirement.

What are the possibilities for an international student to get a working visa without any sponsorship? Can an international student study part time in postgraduate?

$1·         Most working visas req
uire sponsorship by an employer.

$1·         However, there are a number of options which do not require sponsorship, including:

$1o   A Graduate Temporary subclass 485 visa: for students completing qualifications taking at least 2 Academic Years of study in Australia

$1o   A Working Holiday subclass 417 visa: for people aged under 31 who hold passports from certain countries only

$1o   It is also possible to use a visitor visa or student visa to explore business opportunities and in some cases establish a business in Australia. In this case, it may be possible for the student to “self-sponsor” for a 457 visa. The business would need to be relatively well established and have Australian workers for this to be possible.

If studying in Australia on a student visa, the student must study full time, even if this is at postgraduate level.

$1·         Students who are studying a masters degree by research or doctoral degree can work full time once they have commenced their studies.

$1·         Spouses and partners of students completing a master or doctoral degree can work full time also.

What are the requirements for English for the post study working visa?

$1·         Students must show that they have Competent English to qualify for a Graduate Temporary Subclass 485 visa. There are three ways of establishing this:

$1o   Minimum of 6 in each of the 4 bands of IELTS

$1o   OET B pass

$1o   Being a holder of a UK, US, Ireland, Canada or NZ passport

$1·         If testing is required, it must be conducted prior to lodgement of the 485 visa. Tests up to 3 years old can be used for the purposes of General Skilled Migration.

After graduation, what do I need to do to apply for skill migration (permanent visa)? What are the conditions and procedure?

$1·         There are a number of different General Skilled Migration types, and the process depends on which of these you are going for:

$1o   Skilled Independent Subclass 189: this requires an occupation on the Skilled Occupations List (SOL) but does not require sponsorship by a relative or state/territory government

$1o   Skilled Nominated Subclass 190: this requires an occupation on the Consolidated Sponsored Occupations List and a nomination by a state or territory government

$1o   Skilled Regional (Provisional) Subclass 489: requires either sponsorship by a relative living in a designated area or by a state or territory government

$1·         In general, the application process for General Skilled Migration is as follows:

$1o   Complete English language testing

$1o   Complete Skills Assessment

$1o   Make Expression of Interest through SkillSelect

$1o   For subclass 190 or 489, complete state nomination

$1o   Once a SkillSelect invitation is received, make the application for a skilled migration visa

$1o   Complete Health and Police checks

$1o   Only once the SkillSelect Invitation is received and the application for the skilled migration visa is lodged would a student receive a bridging visa.

$1·         Many students do not have sufficient time to go through all the required processes before their stu
dent visas expire and so must rely on making an application for a Graduate Temporary subclass 485 visa on completion of their studies.

What are the chances that I would be employed here in Australia after I finish my course?

It’s difficult to give a general answer to this question. However, you can improve your chances of obtaining a skilled job by:

$1·         Improve your English Language Ability:  improving your communication skills will significantly increase your effectiveness in an interview

$1·         Seeking work in your field during your studies:  even if you work as an unpaid intern in your occupation, this can make your CV more impressive and help you to make contacts with potential employers

$1·         Making use of the University Careers Centre:  the Careers Centre can give you tips on preparing your resume and interview technique, as well as give you information on potential employers in your field

$1·         Professional Year:  if you are studying IT, Engineering or Accounting, you can complete a Professional Year after your studies. As this involves an internship, as well as workplace skills training, this can greatly enhance your chance of getting a skilled job after your studies

$1·         Making friends with your Australian classmates:  Most jobs are not advertised and the better your contacts, the more likely you will be aware of job opportunities which arise

My postgraduate research sector visa (subclass 574) expires on 28 Feb 2015. How long I can stay in Australia after my projected PhD thesis submission on March 2014?

$1·         If your visa was granted after 5 November 2011, your 574 visa should be valid for 6 months after the usual duration of your course. This gives you additional time to allow for marking and re-submission of your thesis.

$1o    Once your thesis has been accepted and you have met the requirements for award of your qualification, you should look at applying for a visa for further stay in Australia as soon as possible.

$1o   Once you have met requirements for award of your qualification, your university will notify the Department of Immigration that you have completed. Unless you have applied for further stay, it’s quite possible that the Department of Immigration will look at cancelling your visa.

$1·         If marking takes longer than 6 months, you may need to either extend your student visa or notify the Department of Immigration that marking is taking longer than anticipated.

$1·         It appears that your 574 visa will be valid for almost 12 months after submission of your thesis. Your visa will allow you to remain in Australia for 6 months after submission or until your thesis is accepted, whichever is sooner. I would recommend that you look at visa options to extend your stay once your thesis is marked, and would certainly not rely on remaining in Australia for 12 months after submission on your current 574 visa.

 

What are the requirements for the 457 employer sponsor visa?

There are three stages to the 457 visa application :

$11.       Sponsorship:  Employer would need to apply for approval as a Standard Business Sponsor. To get this approval, the business will need to provide evidence of financial position, record of training Australians in the business to at least 1% of payroll (unless sponsor is an overseas entity).

$12.       Nomination:  Employer has to apply for permission to fill a nominated position with overseas national. The position needs to meet minimum salary requirements – currently $53,900 minimum annual salary and also be at the applicable market rate. Your occupation needs to be on the approved list of occupations (CSOL).

$13.       Personal: Employee has to demonstrate they have skills necessary to fill the position, meet English requirements (Vocational English – minimum of 5 in each of the 4 components of IELTS) and all members of the family travelling to Australia must meet health requirements

 

Will I be eligible for the post study working visa if I completed one year master from another university and now I am doing a second master from UWS? I came to Australia before November, however my course started in Feb 2012.

$1·         If you came to Australia prior to November 2011, you will unfortunately not be eligible for a Post Study Work Visa. You may, however, be eligible for a 485 visa in the Graduate Work stream.

$1·         It is possible to use two master degree qualifications to meet the required Australian study requirement. The total numb
er of weeks required to complete the qualifications must be at least 92 weeks as registered on CRICOS, and caution must be used if there have been academic exemptions.

 

Are students allowed to partake in business such as Import/Export or any sole proprietor business in Australia?

$1·         Students are allowed to start a business in Australia whilst holding a student visa. However, students should be cautious about the following:

$1o   Not exceeding the 40 hours per fortnight limitation 8105/8104

$1o   Ensuring that they have all the relevant business registrations and licensing, and make the necessary tax lodgements

$1o   Students should consult an accountant to ensure that their business is properly set up to trade lawfully in Australia.

 

What steps would be required to change from a Post Study Work Arrangements Visa to a Permanent Residency Visa? How long would this process take?

$1·         There are a number of permanent residency options which students can look at whilst on a Post Study Work visa. These include:

$1o   General Skilled Migration: outlined above

$1o   Employer Sponsorship: if you have a job offer with an Australian employer

$1o   Family Sponsorship: if you have an Australian partner or other relatives in Australia.

$1o   Processing times vary depending on which option you choose, but can take anywhere from 3-4 months to 12-18 months.

As a PhD student of marketing, what visa can I apply for as a Tutor or lecturer? When should I apply for it? How long does it take to process?

$1·         The occupations of Tutor and Lecturer are on the Consolidated Sponsored Occupations List (CSOL) but not on the Skilled Occupations List (SOL).

$1·         This means that you can apply for employer sponsored or state/territory sponsored visas, but not for the skilled independent subclass 189 visa.

$1·         In terms of the Graduate Temporary subclass 485 visa, you could apply for the Post Study Work stream, but not for the Graduate Work Stream.

$1·         To qualify for the Post Study Work stream, you would need to have applied for your first student visa prior to 5 November 2011. However, there is no occupations list and you can use potentially any qualifications at the bachelor, master or doctorate level regardless of which discipline you have studied in.

$1·         To qualify for the Graduate Work stream, you must nominate an occupation on the Skilled Occupations List (SOL). Unfortunately, the occupations of marketing specialist, university lecturer and university tutor are not on the Skilled Occupations List.

I applied for a student visa before Nov 2011, doing a course on SOL, but by the time I am finished, the course is no longer on SOL, how do I get a work permit then?

$1·         If your occupation is no longer on the SOL, then it may not be possible to apply for Graduate Work Stream.

$1·         The following options require your occupation to be on the CSOL, which is much wider than the SOL:

$1o   Employer Sponsorship

$1o   State/Territory Nomination: ie the Skilled Nominated Subclass 190 or the Skilled Regional Provisional Subclass 489 visa

$1·         If you are unable to lodge prior to the expiry of your current student visa, you may need to either:

$1o   Extend your studies in Australia; or

$1o   Await the outcome of your application overseas

Need help with your Visa?

If you would like a full assessment of your visa options, please Contact Us to book a consultation with one o
f our experts.

November 7, 2013
November 7, 2013

THE Abbott government yesterday moved to loosen visa restrictions to attract international students, prompting calls for increased funding for regulators to ensure there was no return to the “visa factory” that marked the height of the 2008-09 higher education boom.

From next year, tougher restrictions on students from countries with the highest risk of visa fraud will be scrapped, effectively reducing the cash such applicants are required to have in the bank to support themselves during their study.

The government has also fast-tracked a decision to extend streamlined visa processing beyond the university sector to 22 TAFEs and private providers that deliver bachelor degrees and higher qualifications.

The government wants to boost international student revenue from about $15 billion last year back to the former peak of almost $19bn. “The changes will assist all providers, but particularly the vocational education and training sector, making access to Australia’s education system more attractive for overseas students,” Immigration Minister Scott Morrison said.

TAFE Directors Australia’s head of international engagement Peter Holden welcomed the move, noting that the previous Labor government had not acted on a vow to extend streamlined processing, instead sitting on a decision for 18 months.

Mr Holden said he was disappointed that it remained limited to bachelor degree- and higher-qualification students, noting that public TAFEs should be trusted to monitor students doing sub-degree programs.

He said the loosening of restrictions should be matched by more resources for the Australian Skills Quality Authority to adequately monitor the sector. “We would be looking to ASQA to maintain, if not increase their surveillance.” Phil Honeywood, head of the International Education Association of Australia, also urged the government to extend the streamlined system to reputable vocational providers offering diplomas and certificates.

He was confident that scrutiny on degree-granting providers was sufficient, but extending streamlined processing to students undertaking diplomas and certificates would need to be backed by sufficient monitoring.

Adrian McCoomb, head of the Council of Private Higher Education, was delighted, saying that under Labor it had been a “debacle” trying to get approval for private providers to compete for international students on equal terms with universities.

Opposition higher education spokesman Kim Carr said the government should be cautious. “The advice provided to me during my time as minister was that the quality of the companies operating in this area varied considerably and that unsustainable levels of international students can lead to further questions about the quality of education.”

Source: ANDREW TROUNSON,  THE AUSTRALIAN  OCTOBER 30, 2013 

November 7, 2013

The number of visa applications granted for overseas students to study in Australia has increased by approximately 4% marking the second year in a row of growth for the sector.

Numbers had previously been falling but the financial year 2012/2013 has seen figures rise with the previous year of 290,761 applications lodged compared with 280,003, according to data from the annual Student Visa Programme Trends report.

In the second quarter of 2013, approximately 93% of visa applications assessed during this period were granted a visa.

The report shows that student visa numbers have returned to a sustainable growth over the last two years and this is part of a broader trend throughout the past 10 years.

The report states that this growth has been driven by applications lodged outside of Australia which increased by 11.1% in the same period and there were 304,251 student visa holders in Australia as of 30 June 2013. Of these visa holders, 23.4% were from China, the largest cohort, followed by 10% from India.

During the June 2013 quarter, 75% of all student visas were processed within 30 days, while 50% were processed within 14 days. About 93% of applications assessed during this period were granted a visa.

International students must have a valid visa for the duration of their studies in Australia. Most international students will need a student visa. However, visitor visas permit up to three months study and working holiday maker visas permit up to four months study.

To be eligible for a student visa, applicants must be accepted for full time study in a course listed on the Commonwealth Register of Institutions and Courses for Overseas Students (CRICOS.) Applicants must also meet financial, health insurance, English language proficiency and character requirements.

There is no limit on the number of student visas issued each year. If applicants meet requirements, they will be granted a student visa. Student visas are issued for the entire period of study in Australia. Visas are issued in alignment with the period for which the applicant has Overseas Student Health Cover (OSHC.)

There are two other visas related to the student visa programme, the Student Guardian (subclass 580) visa and the Temporary Graduate (subclass 485) visa. The Student Guardian visa is for individuals who wish to accompany and care for minors studying in Australia. The Temporary Graduate visa allows international students to live and work in Australia temporarily after they have finished their studies.

Student visas include a condition that, once the course has commenced, allows most students to work for up to 40 hours per fortnight while their course is in session and for unlimited hours during course breaks.

There can be some confusion about working hours but students are urged to make sure that they know what they are permitted to do. ‘The limitation imposed by this visa condition reflects the purpose of a student visa; that it is to allow entry to Australia in order to study, not to work. Secondary visa holders are subject to a visa condition that limits them to 40 hours work per fortnight at any time,’ said an immigration spokesman.

November 7, 2013

Education Minister Christopher Pyne: “We need new architecture in international education.” Picture: Ray Strange. Source: The Australian
EDUCATION Minister Christopher Pyne has promised to open the jobs market to more overseas students who have graduated from Australian universities, as a means of rehabilitating the stagnant $14 billion international education industry.
In his first speech on the industry since he was sworn in as minister, Mr Pyne said yesterday the Abbott government would move quickly to extend the streamlined visa process beyond universities to training colleges, and maximise career opportunities in Australia for the best foreign graduates of our universities.
Monash University researcher Bob Birrell said he was troubled by any policy changes that used migration or easier labour market access as a lure to sell education, especially if it encouraged a repeat of last decade’s boom in low-quality diplomas pitched at foreign students seeking permanent residency.
“We know from past experience there are literally hundreds of operators who are skilled in packaging courses that provide the cheapest possible entry,” Dr Birrell said.
Under the Howard government, which linked gaining an Australian tertiary qualification with permanent residency, thousands of students swarmed into low-level vocational diplomas and dozens of dodgy private colleges exploited the lax policy.
Mr Pyne acknowledged past abuses and said preventing any repeat would be “very much part of our planning, to get that right”.
“But Labor used a sledgehammer to break a walnut (following the excesses of the education-migration boom) and we don’t want to repeat that error. But we also don’t want to go back to a situation where people lose faith in the quality of education in Australia.”
Mr Pyne told the Australian International Education Conference in Canberra he would work with Immigration Minister Scott Morrison to maximise the international student market while maintaining visa integrity and educational quality.
Universities Australia welcomed Mr Pyne’s speech as showing the government’s intention “to turbo-charge international education policy against a backdrop of declining enrolments and export revenue”.
A report from accountancy firm Deloitte yesterday identified education exports as one of five “super-growth” sectors offering prosperity as the mining investment boom recedes.
At yesterday’s conference, attended by several hundred education delegates from around the world, Mr Pyne said Labor had presided over a decline in education exports from $18.6bn in 2009 to a little more than $14bn last year – “quite an achievement in a growing economy”.
He cited forecasts that the Asia-Pacific middle class would rise from 500 million to 3.2 billion by 2030, and that the number of young people in the world looking to study abroad would double to more than seven million by 2020.
The National Tertiary Education Union said last night it feared Mr Pyne’s proposal was part of a broader government strategy to avoid increasing taxpayer funding to universities.
Jeannie Rea, the union’s national president, said the government was seeking to increase international student fee revenue to universities rather than plug the direct funding gap faced by universities. “It becomes a cross subsidisation,” Ms Rea said.
 
Source: THE AUSTRALIAN , BERNARD LANE , OCTOBER 10, 2013 
 

March 8, 2013

 

Nearly three-quarters of Australians believe international students should be encouraged to stay in the country after completing their university studies, according to a survey.

Universities Australia has released research on perceptions of the tertiary sector on the eve of this week’s higher education conference in Canberra.

About 80 per cent of 300 business representatives surveyed and 72 per cent of 1000 members of the public said international students should be encouraged to stay in Australia on completion of their studies, particularly if sponsored by an employer.

”However, some stakeholder respondents have voiced concerns that the university system is perceived to be too heavily reliant on income from international student enrolments,” the report said.

”There is also a view that additional support, for instance with English language learning and better facilities such as affordable student housing, may be required.

”Participants were generally comfortable about the proportion of internationally students, at roughly 20 per cent.”

The study found Australian universities were generally well regarded, with 88 per cent of the surveyed public saying they would encourage their child or young people they knew to attend university.

Most saw the main role of universities to educate for skilled/professional jobs, with far fewer identifying the sector’s contribution to research and development – something Universities Australia described as being of ”some concern”.

Universities Australia chief executive Belinda Robinson said the study showed that people strongly valued international students, who helped build deep cultural ties with their fellow students and the wider community.

”International students are also playing a pivotal role in increasing our engagement with Asian nations during this Asian Century,” she said.

”They are helping Australia forge valuable links with their home countries, providing a cross-cultural dialogue with domestic students and sustaining ongoing relationships with Australia in their post-student lives.”

A spokesman for Universities Australia said the polling involved qualitative and quantitative research, including focus groups and surveys of the public and business.

He said the data was weighted to be representative of the Australian population and the whole business community.

The higher education conference, running from Wednesday to Friday, will include keynote speeches by new Tertiary Education Minister Chris Bowen, Opposition Leader Tony Abbott, Universities Australia chairman Glyn Davis, and former Treasury secretary Ken Henry.

 

By Daniel Hurst Feb. 26, 2013

Source: NewCastle Herald

November 9, 2012

 

Professor Lesleyanne Hawthorne writes:

Amid Australia’s ongoing doctor shortage, the health system risks losing dozens of Australian-trained, foreign-born doctors because of a shortage of intern places. The Australian Medical Students Association estimates the system needs 182 intern places to ensure all international students can finish their medical training and gain full registration as doctors.

These intern, (or post-graduate year one) places, are based in hospitals, which are run by the states. But the Commonwealth also bears some funding responsibility for medical training. The Commonwealth, state and territory health ministers are expected to discuss who should pay and potential solutions to the problem when they meet tomorrow in Perth.

Rise of international student migration

Over the past decade, international students have emerged as a prized and contested human capital resource. OECD and select Asian countries are expanding their international student flows, through global promotion strategies and regional migration programs, aligned with lower entry requirements, including for medical degrees.

International students have been immensely responsive to these migration options. In 1975, 600,000 international students were enrolled abroad, compared with 3.4 million in 2009. By 2025, it is predicted there will be 7.2 million international students studying globally.

A recent British Council survey of 153,000 international students confirmed opportunities for migration exert an extraordinary impact on the choice of study destination. While students sought a high quality, internationally recognised education, the scope to remain and work was found to “massively impact” both decisions and expectations.

 

In 1999, following the removal of a three-year eligibility bar, international students became immediately eligible to migrate to Australia. Within six years of the policy change, 52% of skilled migrants were selected onshore.

By 2010, 630,000 international students were enrolled in Australian courses (all fields and sectors). Of these, 18,487 were undertaking health degrees, including over 3,000 medical and 10,000 nursing students. International medical student graduates grew 223% from 1999 to 2009, compared with 52% growth in Australian domestic graduates.

International medical students

In 2009, the majority of international medical students were enrolled at

  • Monash,
  • Melbourne,
  • Queensland,
  • New South Wales and
  • Sydney universities.

Their source countries were highly diverse – most notably

  • Malaysia (1,134 students),
  • Singapore (577),
  • Canada (437),
  • the United States (84) and
  • Botswana (74), followed by
  • South Korea,
  • Brunei,
  • Hong Kong,
  • Indonesia and
  • Sri Lanka.

These international students achieve stellar rates of immediate employment and are highly attractive to local employers. As demonstrated by yet-to-be-published research conducted for the Medical Deans of Australia, 45% of international students plan to remain in Australia when they commence their studies. By their final year, 78% accept intern places (virtually all those who are not scholarship students sponsored by their home governments).

Australia’s Graduate Destination Survey from 2009-2011 reveals their employment outcomes to be near identical to those achieved by domestic students (99.6% working full-time at four months compared with 99.7%). The source country was almost irrelevant, with 100% of Canadian, US, Malaysian, Indonesian, Taiwanese, Norwegian and Botswanan students fully employed, compared with 97% from Singapore and 89% from China.

International medical graduates

As affirmed by the OECD, Australia has developed extraordinary reliance on international medical graduates (IMGs), who gain their qualifications overseas.

 

By 2006, 45% of Australian residents holding medical qualifications were overseas-born, including an estimated 25% who were overseas-qualified. The United Kingdom/Ireland, China, India, North Africa/ Middle East, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, South Africa and the Philippines were major sources of migration.

This diversification of supply has proven extremely challenging for Australia. The 2006 census shows just 53% of IMGs secured medical employment in Australia in their first five years of residence (across all immigration categories).

Doctors from English-speaking background countries moved seamlessly into work, while Commonwealth-Asian doctors fared reasonably. Outcomes were poor, by contrast, for many birthplace groups. Just 6% of doctors from China found medical employment within five years, along with 23% from Vietnam and 31% from Eastern Europe.

 

Employment access is significantly better for IMGs selected through the 457 visa temporary sponsored pathway. From 2005-06 to 2010-11 17,910 doctors were sponsored as temporary 457 visa migrants to pre-arranged jobs, with a 99% immediate employment rate.

From 2004-05 to 2010-11, an additional 2,790 IMGs were admitted through the permanent General Skilled Migration category. But not all passed the Australian Medical Council examinations, which are a requirement for unconditional registration in Australia. From 1978 to 2010, 82% of candidates passed the MCQ (the standard theoretical examination), typically on their first or second attempt, along with 85% of clinical candidates. But overall AMC completion rates were just 43%, since many choose not to persist with the process.

Large numbers of IMGs face significant barriers to securing professional registration. By contrast, international medical students face no impediments: they’re of prime workforce age (far younger than IMGs) and have self-funded to meet Australian domestic requirements.

Medical students’ future

We know that large numbers of international medical students wish to migrate to Australia – and access to intern places is critical for them to secure permanent resident status.

If Australia fails to retain these graduates, other countries will. Singapore, for instance, actively recruits in Australia, in a context where the nation’s fertility rate is incredibly low. New Zealand annually registers over 1,200 IMGs per year, but two-thirds will have left within two years. So there is major interest in attracting Australian-trained graduates.

If Australia is serious about retaining international medical students in the future, it’s vital to provide access to intern training places. While the students’ long-term intentions are unknown, it’s clear they have great potential to address Australian workforce shortages in the future.

 

** Lesleyanne Hawthorne is Professor of International Health Workforce, at the Australian Health Workforce Institute, University of Melbourne

This article was first published by The Conversation. A reminder to www.mystudyinaustralia.com readers that TC articles are freely available for republishing under a creative commons licence.

November 9, 2012

 

The Australian National University (ANU) and University of Canberra have increased their international student numbers, bucking the national trend. So far this year the ANU has enrolled 5,392 international students. That is 40 more than in 2011. At the University of Canberra (UC) overseas students increased by 4 per cent in semester one to 2,130. Nationally, the number of international students has fallen 7 per cent for the year to September, with several interstate universities blaming the high Australian dollar.

ANU Professor Marnie Hughes-Warrington says the national capital remains an attractive place to study. “What it comes down to is reputation for the quality of study, research reputation. Even simple things like is the environment a good place to live and is it a safe place to live?” she said.”All of those things are big ticks for Canberra.”

Professor Hughes-Warrington says the biggest growth has been in post-graduate study. “There’s an evolution towards graduate offerings and research offerings at ANU,” she said. “We’re seen as really strong in those areas because we’re such a strong research institution. We are increasingly seeing ourselves as a graduate destination of choice for students from around the world.”

 

SOURCE: ABC Online

By Clarissa Thorpe

November 7, 2012
November 7, 2012

 With seven of the world’s top 100 universities, Australia has confirmed its position as one of the world’s leading destinations for international students.

Australia has always punched above its weight in the QS World University Rankings, and 2012 is no exception. In fact, Australia’s haul of seven universities in the global top 100 is bettered only by the US and UK.

This tally includes all but one of Australia’s elite Group of Eight, the universities at which the bulk of the nation’s cutting-edge research has traditionally taken place.

  • Australia National University leads the pack in 24th place, extending its lead over second-placed
  • University of Melbourne, which drops slightly to 36.

Fellow Group of Eight members

  • University of Sydney (39) and
  • University of Queensland (46) make the global top 50, with a further three Aussie universities in the top 100:
  • University of New South Wales (52),
  • Monash University(61), and
  • University of Western Australia (79).

 

Great job prospects

So what makes Australian universities stand out? A big strength is their reputation among international employers, which will be good news both for Australian graduates and the 240,000 international students who study there each year.

Interestingly, employers identify the University of Melbourne as the nation’s top producer of graduate talent, and ninth in the world in this measure. The rest of the Group of Eight also performs strongly in this measure, alongside other Australian institutions such as RMIT University and the University of Wollongong.

This high level of international recognition for Australian graduates is testament to Australian universities’ success in preparing candidates for the workplace. Employers are asked to identify the universities that produce the best graduates, meaning the leading Australian universities are regarded as a great place to find highly skilled employees.

 

Global student mix

Australian universities’ success may also be linked to another factor: their internationally diverse character. Australian universities were among the first to really embrace internationalization, and as a result the campuses are meeting points for students and academics from all over the world.

Read More

October 30, 2012

IEAA glad to announce that after lobbying number of years, Australian NSW Government agreed to give student travel discounts for International Students.  The NSW Government has announced public transport fare discounts for international students as part of ongoing efforts to promote the State as a world-class location for international education.

 

Premier Barry O’Farrell made the announcement in India, where he is currently promoting NSW’s education credentials as part of a trade mission, while Acting Premier and Minister for Trade and Investment Andrew Stoner was joined at the University of Sydney by Parliamentary Secretary for Tertiary Education and Skills Gabrielle Upton and Acting Vice-Chancellor Professor Stephen Garton.

“International education is the State’s second biggest industry in terms of exports – worth $6 billion,” Mr O’Farrell said. “We have world-class universities, vocational institutions and research organisations, but we need to do more to attract international students seeking high quality education, cultural and employment experience. “The travel concessions announced today will increase the attraction of NSW as an ideal location for further education and provide better access to safe and affordable public transport options for overseas students.”

Mr Stoner said the changes mean international students will soon have access to public transport travel discounts of up to 35 per cent. “Enhancing NSW’s reputation as a highly regarded location for international education and research will be critical to our efforts to position the NSW economy for growth in the next decade,” Mr Stoner said.

“The new travel concessions are a direct response to a recommendation from the NSW Government’s International Education and Research Taskforce which released its final report today.”

Mr Stoner said the Taskforce’s final report outlines 21 specific recommendations for Government and Industry to help position NSW as a global leader in international education by 2021. “We have already begun acting on a number of matters highlighted by the Taskforce, with the NSW Strategy for Business Migration & Attracting International Students released earlier this year calling for the extension of streamlined visa processing and post study work rights for a broader pool of overseas students based in NSW,” Mr Stoner said. “Our full response to the Taskforce’s final report will be released soon, but our announcement today is a first step towards making NSW a more attractive international education destination.

“International students will have access to potential discounts of up to 35 per cent on MyMulti passes offering periodic unlimited travel on buses, trains, light rail and ferries in Greater Sydney, the Hunter and the Illawarra. “The discounts allow for potential savings of more than $800 on an annual MyMulti3 pass and more than $450 on an annual MyMulti2. Overseas students can also save more than $200 on a MyMulti3 90 day pass and $133 on a MyMulti2 90 day pass. “The savings can apply to all travel, not simply travel to and from students’ place of study, so this provides a fantastic opportunity for students to get out and explore Sydney and NSW.”

Ms Upton said the Taskforce’s final report identified a range of challenges and opportunities facing the NSW international education sector. “While the market for international students is increasingly competitive, opportunities for growth are enormous with global demand for international higher education forecast to grow from 2.2 million in 2005 to 3.7 million in 2025. China, India, Malaysia and Indonesia are predicted to account for over 60 per cent of this growth,” Ms Upton said.

“The final report of the NSW Government’s International Education and Research Taskforce outlines a range of measures Government and Industry can take to position NSW as a significant global player and Australia’s leading State for international education and research. “The report calls for the NSW Government to ramp up its efforts to lobby for Federal level improvements to the quality of teaching, courses and research. “The quality of the total student experience is also identified as a key target for improvement, with Government asked to consider issues including affordable accommodation and transport, access to part time employment, industry placements while studying, and employment on completion of study.

“The Taskforce also recommends creation of a new agency to provide a one-stop-shop for information for international students and to drive implementation of a range of other recommendations on issues including quality, migration, post study work rights and levels of research funding.”

For more information, please read the attached media release.

September 26, 2012

IEAA glad to announce that IEAA and UPC will provide sponsorship for 18 months paid traineeship and they might be eligible as a Childcare Centre Manager. With this program trains childcare diploma graduates to be qualified as Childcare Centre Managers.
On completion of the Diploma, finding employment is essential so that you can enrol into the occupational training program (OTP). For the next 18 months, you will work full-time earning an annual income between $AU35,000 to $AU42,000.
 
On completion of the OTP, you are qualified as a childcare centre manager and eligible for temporary or permanent work in Australia. The critical point of the occupational training program is employment and to gain employment, you should

  • have good results in the Certificate III and Diploma courses,
  • have a good track record on work placement and extra paid jobs during your study,
  • achieve good English proficiency (No set English level is required),as well as attain good communication skills,
  • have a positive attitude to work and gaining experience on the job.

There is a high demand for childcare professionals in Australia, a trend which is set to continue for many years ahead, but nobody can guarantee you a job. It is your future and your responsibility.
On completion of your Diploma of Children’s Services, the Australian Government allows you to advance in your childcare profession by working and training in the early childhood sector using the Occupational Trainee Visa (OTV).
Three conditions for the Occupational Trainee Visa:

  • a full-time job offer
  • a customised training program and
  • an approved sponsor to monitor the training program.

Read More

September 10, 2012

 

IEA-A glad to announce that TAFE NSW offers international students an opportunity to undertake Diplomas in Hospitality and Events at the same time with “guaranteed” paid work. In addition to that students can directly start to final year of the Bachelor of Business Degree Program. In total three years, three internationally recognised qualification:

–          Diploma of Hospitality

–          Diploma of Events

–          Bachelor of Business

–          and 3 years work experience

During “guaranteed” paid employment placements (minimum “guaranteed” 10 hours per week with $23 hourly rate). Students can start the work after completing first 3 months of the Hospitality diploma program. Students legally can work 20 hours per week during school weeks and full time during the holidays.

 

English Entry requirements:

  • IELTS 5.5 or equivalent

–          $6325 per semester ( total 4 semester in 2 year programs).

Fee covers tuition, uniforms, texts and registration with Work Solutions for paid employment.

Advantages

  • Two               Diplomas in 2 years or
  • Two diplomas + Bachelor of Business Degree in 3 years
    • Complete a Bachelor of Business with one more year of study in the Blue Mountains International Hotel Management School
    • 2 years paid work experience at Australian Turf Club (ATC), Rosehill Gardens (2008 Restaurant and Catering NSW/ACT Award for Excellence’ and finalist in the ‘Venue Caterer’ category).

Intake

TAFETR English Course Oct 2012, Feb 2013

TAFENSW SWSI Diploma February, April, June, Sep 2013

Students need to start Diploma of Hospitality course (C18115) first and then Diploma of Events course (C18075). The Hospitality course starts on Feb, Apr, Jul, Sep in 2013 and offered at Campbelltown campus. You can find both courses details at the following link

http://www.detinternational.nsw.edu.au/tafe/courses/certificate_diploma_courses/cC18115.html

http://www.detinternational.nsw.edu.au/tafe/courses/certificate_diploma_courses/cC18075.html

Number of hours work placement

Students              gain a minimum               of 10 hours paid work a week (after a training period of 3 months without pay) during the course. They also have the opportunity for further work at major events in Sydney such as ANZ Stadium and the Easter show. The minimum hourly wage is $23/hour.

 

Career Opportunities

•     Cafe/Coffee Shop Operator

•     Hotel Service Supervisor

•     Hotel/Motel Manager

•     Event managers

•     Resort management

•     Event Coordinator

•     Venue coordinator

•     Conference coordinator

•     Exhibition coordinator

•     Event manager

•     Venue manager

•     Conference manager

•     Exhibition manager

 

Degree pathway

Diploma  graduates can gain credit of up to two years in either the Bachelor of Business (International Hotel and Resort Management) or Bachelor of Business (International Hotel Management) with our tertiary partner Blue Mountains International Hotel Management School, ranked No: 1 InAustralasia*.

 

* by the Hotel and Tourism industry-conducted by Taylor Nelson Sofres (TNS) PLC in the United Kingdom, the world’s largest provider of custom research and analysis.

 

There are very limited number of places are available, so please make required announcement to your student base now to not miss this great opportunity.

 

For further information about the course, college locations and how to apply visit our website

www.mystudyinaustralia.com www.tafetr.net www.tafensw.edu.au

sydney@inteducation.com / info@tafetr.com

September 5, 2012

Australian universities ranked amongst the best in the world

 

Five Australian universities have been ranked amongst the world’s top 100 according to the latest Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU),  released this month.

 

In 2012,

  • The University of Melbourne (57),
  • The Australian National University (64),
  • The University of Queensland (90),
  • The University of Sydney (93) and
  • The University of Western Australia (96)

were listed amongst the world’s best.

 

This year’s rankings indicate the relative strength of the Australia’s university system and reflect the sector’s significant investment in continuous improvement; in 2012, Australia was just one of two countries to increase the number of universities represented in the top 100.

 

Welcoming the news, Chief Executive of Universities Australia, Belinda Robinson, said the country’s improved standings in the 2012 ARWU is apt recognition of the high-quality of Australian research and teaching programs.

 

“This is an outstanding result for Australia and demonstrates the nation’s commitment to having a world class university system providing teaching and research at the highest levels,” said Ms Robinson

 

“Universities’ central role in creating opportunities for all Australians to study in a world class higher education system should be acknowledged and celebrated,” Ms Robinson said.

 

Source: Austrade, 5 September 2012

August 31, 2012

 

While most international students in Australia are full-fee paying students, another option is to apply for a scholarship.

Scholarships are offered by education institutions and a number of other organisations and the Australian Government.  They cover various educational sectors, including

  • vocational education and training,
  • student exchanges,
  • undergraduate and
  • postgraduate study and research.

Usually Australian Government scholarships are not available for English language training specifically in Australia. However, there are several English language training scholarships offered by Australian institutions.

For information on scholarships use Australian Government  Scholarships Database. It provides an accurate and reliable list of all scholarships supplied by Australian-based organisations, institutions and government bodies to international students studying or planning to study in Australia on a student visa.

The Australia Awards aim to promote knowledge, education links and enduring ties between Australia and our neighbours through Australia’s extensive scholarship programs.

The Australia Awards brings the Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) and the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR) scholarships together under the Australia Awards program.

Further information can be found at www.AustraliaAwards.gov.au

There are three programs available under the Australia Awards. They are:

  • Endeavour Awards is the Australian Government’s internationally competitive, merit-based scholarship program providing opportunities for citizens of the Asia-Pacific, Middle East, Europe and the America’s to undertake study, research or professional development in Australia. Further information can be found at: www.deewr.gov.au/EndeavourAwards

 

  • Australian Leadership Awards (ALA) focus on developing leaders who can influence social and economic policy reform and development outcomes in both their own countries and in the Asia-Pacific region. ALAs provide scholarship support for postgraduate studies in Australia and short-term fellowship opportunities in specialised research, study or professional attachments through participating Australian organisations. Further information can be found at: www.ausaid.gov.au/scholar

 

  • Australian Development Scholarships (ADS) aim to contribute to the long-term development needs of Australia’s partner countries to promote good governance, economic growth and human development. ADS provides people with the necessary skills and knowledge to drive change and influence the development outcomes of their own country, through obtaining tertiary qualifications at participating Australian institutions. Further information can be found at: www.ausaid.gov.au/scholar
August 29, 2012

 

*Please note that these dates may change without notice, please confirm on the Universities /TAFE websites.

DATE

Institute

15-Jul-12

CQUniversity Open Day 2012 Brisbane

22-Jul-12

CQUniversity Open Day 2012 Gold Coast

22-Jul-12

CQUniversity Open Day 2012 Melbourne

25-Jul-12

Southbank Institute of Technology Info Night South Brisbane, QLD

25-Jul-12

Australian Catholic University Open Day & Night Brisbane, QLD

29-Jul-12

QUT Open Day Kelvin Grove, QLD

29-Jul-12

CQUniversity Open Day 2012 Sydney

29-Jul-12

Edith Cowan University Open Day Joondalup Campus

3-Aug-12

CQUniversity Open Day 2012 Gladstone

4-Aug-12

Monash University Berwick, Gippsland, Peninsula, VIC

5-Aug-12

Monash University Caulfield, Clayton, Parkville, VIC

5-Aug-12

University of Southern Queensland Hervey Bay, QLD

5-Aug-12

CQUniversity Open Day 2012 Noosa

5-Aug-12

La Trobe University Open Day Albury-Wodonga

5-Aug-12

University of Queensland St Lucia, QLD

5-Aug-12

Curtain University Open Day Perth, WA

5-Aug-12

James Cook University Open Day Mackay, QLD

8-Aug-12

University of Queensland Ipswich, QLD

10-Aug-12

La Trobe University Open Day Shepparton, VIC

12-Aug-12

CQUniversity Open Day 2012 Bundaberg

12-Aug-12

Edith Cowan University Open Day Mount Lawley Campus

12-Aug-12

Griffith University Gold Coast, Nathan and South Bank, QLD

12-Aug-12

RMIT University Melbourne, VIC

12-Aug-12

Australian Catholic University Open Day & Night Melbourne, VIC

12-Aug-12

Deakin University Warrnambool, VIC

12-Aug-12

University of Sunshine Coast Open Day Sunshine Coast, QLD

12-Aug-12

University of Western Australia Perth, WA

17-Aug-12

La Trobe University Open Day Mildura, VIC

17-Aug-12

Flinders University Adelaide, SA

18-Aug-12

TAFENSW Hunter Institute  2012 Open Day Central Coast at  Ourimbah

18-Aug-12

University of Newcastle Open day Central Coast, NSW

19-Aug-12

University of Notre Dame Fremantle, WA

19-Aug-12

University of Southern Queensland Toowoomba, QLD

19-Aug-12

CQUniversity Open Day 2012 Mackay

19-Aug-12

La Trobe University Open Day Bendigo, VIC

19-Aug-12

Murdoch University Perth, WA

19-Aug-12

University of Queensland Gatton, QLD

19-Aug-12

Deakin University Geelong, VIC

19-Aug-12

James Cook University Open Day Cairns, QLD

19-Aug-12

Swinburne University Melbourne, VIC

19-Aug-12

University of Adelaide Adelaide, SA

19-Aug-12

University of Melbourne Melbourne, VIC

19-Aug-12

University of South Australia Open day Adelaide, SA

20-Aug-12

Holmesglen Institute of TAFE Chadstone, Moorabbin, Waverley, VIC

25-Aug-12

TAFENSW Sydney Institute  Open Day 2012 at Ultimo College

25-Aug-12

University of Notre Dame Sydney, NSW

25-Aug-12

Australia National University Open Day Canberra, ACT

25-Aug-12

Australian Catholic University Open Day & Night Canberra, ACT

25-Aug-12

Sydney Uni Open Day Sydney, NSW

25-Aug-12

University of Newcastle Open day Newcastle, NSW

25-Aug-12

UTS Open day Sydney, NSW

26-Aug-12

University of Southern Queensland Springfield, QLD

26-Aug-12

CQUniversity Open Day 2012 Rockhampton

26-Aug-12

La Trobe University Open Day Melbourne, VIC

26-Aug-12

UTAS Open Day Hobart, Launceston, Cradle Coast Campuses

26-Aug-12

Australian Catholic University Open Day & Night Ballarat, VIC

26-Aug-12

Charles Darwin University Open Day Darwin, NT

26-Aug-12

Deakin University Melbourne, VIC

26-Aug-12

James Cook University Open Day Townsville, QLD

26-Aug-12

University of Ballarat Ballarat, VIC

26-Aug-12

University of Western Sydney Open Day Parramatta, NSW

27-Aug-12

University of Canberra Open Day Canberra, ACT

29-Aug-12

TAFENSW South Western Sydney Institute  Employment Expo and Open Day at Miller College

29-Aug-12

TAFENSW South Western Sydney Institute  SWSi Information Evening at Liverpool College

29-Aug-12

TAFENSW Western Institute  Dubbo College

30-Aug-12

TAFENSW Western Sydney Institute  Nirimba College (Quakers Hill)

30-Aug-12

University of Newcastle Open day Port Macquarie, NSW

01-Sep-12

TAFENSW North Coast Institute  Spring into TAFE at Taree Campus

1-Sep-12

Australian Catholic University Open Day & Night North Sydney, NSW

1-Sep-12

UNSW Info Day 2012 Kensington Campus, NSW

04-Sep-12

TAFENSW North Coast Institute  Deadly Day, Deadly Night at Wauchope Campus

05-Sep-12

TAFENSW Sydney Institute  Eora College Open Evening

06-Sep-12

TAFENSW North Coast Institute  Deadly Day, Deadly Night at Ballina Campus

08-Sep-12

TAFENSW Sydney Institute  Design Centre Enmore Open Day

8-Sep-12

Australian Catholic University Open Day & Night Strathfield, NSW

8-Sep-12

Macquarie University Open Day North Ryde, NSW

11-Sep-12

TAFENSW Sydney Institute  Sutherland College, Gymea Open Evening

12-Sep-12

TAFENSW Sydney Institute  St George College Open Evening

12-Sep-12

TAFENSW Sydney Institute  Sutherland College, Loftus Open Evening

15-Sep-12

TAFENSW Sydney Institute  Petersham College Open Day

15-Sep-12

TAFENSW Western Sydney Institute  Richmond College

10-Nov-12

TAFENSW Illawarra Institute  Wollongong Campus

13-Nov-12

TAFENSW Illawarra Institute  Cooma Campus

13-Nov-12

TAFENSW Illawarra Institute  Dapto Campus

13-Nov-12

TAFENSW Illawarra Institute  Moss Vale Campus

13-Nov-12

TAFENSW Illawarra Institute  Ulladulla Campus

13-Nov-12

TAFENSW Illawarra Institute  Yallah Campus

13-Nov-12

TAFENSW Illawarra Institute  Yass Campus

14-Nov-12

TAFENSW Illawarra Institute  Moruya Campus

14-Nov-12

TAFENSW Illawarra Institute  Queanbeyan Campus

14-Nov-12

TAFENSW Illawarra Institute  Shellharbour Campus

15-Nov-1
2

TAFENSW Illawarra Institute  Bega Campus

15-Nov-12

TAFENSW Illawarra Institute  Goulburn Campus

15-Nov-12

TAFENSW Illawarra Institute  Nowra Campus

August 25, 2012

 

USQ Bachelor of Commerce (Accounting) student Clare Anthony took advantage of the Tafe pathway by completing a diploma before beginning her degree.

AN initiative developed between the University of Southern Queensland and Tafe Queensland to encourage more students to take up tertiary education has returned promising results.

More than 740 students have already joined USQ after studying at Tafe’s throughout Australia.

It is a 121 percent increase in 2011 and early results indicate an even stronger result for 2012.

The Queensland Tertiary Education Network, established in 2011 is the second initiative of the university, designed to strengthen the connection between industry, the higher education sector and the vocational education and training sector.

QTEPNet project manager Di Paez said the increase in numbers indicated students were taking advantage of new seamless pathways into a university degree from Tafe programs.

“There have been a number of opportunities opened up for prospective students,” Ms Paez said.

“Many Tafe’s now offer dual awards with USQ with the benefit of being able to jointly market courses that give seamless transition into degree programs and expand on the number of articulation pathways that are already in place.”

Bachelor of Commerce (Accounting) student Clare Anthony took advantage of the Tafe pathway by completing a Diploma of Events Management at the Bremer Institute of Tafe before beginning her degree.

“On completion, I was able to gain direct entry into a USQ business degree without having to reapply and it took one year off my three year degree,” Ms Anthony said.

“I decided to take this route as I wasn’t certain my OP would make the cut off to go directly into university.

“This way I still only had to complete a three year program, but I have a diploma as well as my degree.

“The Tafe to uni option really suited my situation and worked for me. USQ were extremely supportive and I think it is one of the best pathways to university I know of.

“There is no time wasting and you receive the credit you deserve for the hard work you already put in. If I can do it, than anyone can.”

Now in her final year of study, Ms Anthony said she planned to work as an accountant and continue studying to become a Chartered Accountant.

Source: The Chronicle 23rd August 2012

June 1, 2012

The Australian education system has earned a reputation of being one of the most sought after curricula in the world. In June last year, more than 15,000 Malaysian international students were living in Australia.

In 2010, 73 countries took part in the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) testing, an internationally standardised assessment for 15-year-olds, conducted by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Australia was placed in the top 10, out-performing most of the large English speaking countries. Seven of Australia’s universities are ranked in the top 100 worldwide.

Considering the above and the popularity of the Australian education in Malaysia, it is undoubted that the Australian International School Malaysia (AISM) has earned an outstanding reputation through its rich and rigorous educational programmes, stimulating learning environments, international and multicultural perspectives and highly qualified and experienced Australian-trained staff.

AISM is a vibrant and growing Kindergarten to Year 12 international school for children from age 3 (Preparation) to age 18 (Year 12). Established in 2000, AISM is the only international school in Malaysia offering an Australian curriculum, delivered by Australian teachers and following the Australian school year.

AISM houses all three of its schools, Junior, Middle and Senior, on one campus and has about 560 students represented by more than 30 nationalities. The school offers a rigorous academic programme leading to the Higher School Certificate (HSC).

Whilst great emphasis is placed on academic excellence, the physical, emotional and social dimensions of growth are seen as crucial elements of the school’s teaching and reflect the Australian education philosophy of developing the whole child.

“AISM is certainly a pathway to international excellence. Our students have successfully entered institutions in Australia, the UK, the US, Canada, Hong Kong, Korea, Taiwan, New Zealand, Malaysia, as well as many European countries,” says David Kilpatrick, the school’s principal. “In fact, one of our Year 12 students has received a full scholarship to study in the UK and will be applying to the University of Oxford.”

AISM recently hosted the inaugural meeting of the Principals of Australian International Schools from all over the world. The meeting was attended by principals from other eight countries — United Arab Emirates, Thailand, Indonesia, Singapore, Hong Kong, Vietnam and Bangladesh — who have become the Founding Members of the Australian International Schools Association (AISA). The forming of this association brings together more than 10,000 students who are studying the Australian curriculum throughout the world.

With the formation of AISA, the principals have formalised different means of collaboration between the Australian International Schools that will provide more diverse opportunities for their students to be involved in competition and collaborative events between the schools, explains Kilpatrick.

With the aim of providing the best of Australian education for all in Malaysia, AISM has also invested heavily in creating a truly 21st century, student-centred learning environment. Its recent major development and expansion project will accommodate classrooms and open learning spaces for the school’s Junior students (aged three to 10 years), extensive performing arts facilities (including a Black Box Theatre, instrument practice, orchestral and dance rooms), excellent ICT facilities, a science and technology centre, a new learning resource centre (library) and a dedicated space for Senior students in their final years of study (Year 11 and 12).

Source: New Straits Times (www.nst.com.my )

April 11, 2012

The changes to the permanent employer sponsored visas (ENS and RSMS) coming in on 1 July 2012 are quite significant. One of the main intentions behind the changes to the ENS/RSMS programs is to streamline the process of applying for permanent residence whilst holding a 457 visa.

People will be affected differently by the new changes depending on their circumstances. This article goes through the main winners under the new system.

ENS/RSMS Eligibility Streams

The requirements for ENS and RSMS vary depending on which “eligibility stream” you apply under from 1 July. To appreciate the impact of the changes, it’s important to have an understanding of the eligibility streams:

Temporary Residence Transition:

where applicants have worked with the employer on a 457 visa for the last 2 years. Applicants in this category have a streamlined pathway onto permanent residence through ENS and RSMS from 1 July.

Direct Entry Stream:

for applicants who have not worked in Australia, or who have worked in Australia on a visa other than a 457 visa. Criteria for these applicants are higher – for ENS they must have a skills assessment and 3 years of work experience in their occupation, and RSMS applicants must get approval from a Regional Certifying Body and may also require skills assessment.

Agreement Stream:

for applicants whose employer has a Labour Agreement. Labour agreements are special arrangements individually negotiated with the Department of Immigration, and allow sponsorship in a wider range of occupations and are required for the “on-hire” or “labour hire” industry.

1. People on 457 visas in non-ENS occupations

There are many people on 457 visas who have been sponsored in an occupation which is not on the current ENS Occupations List.

Examples of such occupations include:

  • Cafe or Restaurant Manager
  • Customer Service Managers
  • Various IT specialisations
  • Intermediate service managers (eg
  • Divers and Diving Instructors
  • Farmers

People sponsored for 457 visas in these occupations are currently on a “road to nowhere” – they can stay in Australia on 457 visas, but have limited options in applying for permanent residence.

From 1 July 2012, there will be a single consolidated list of occupations which applies to 457, ENS and State/Territory Sponsored Skilled Visas.

As a result, people already on a 457 visa will be able to look at an ENS visa once they have worked with their employer on a 457 visa in their occupation for 2 years, even if their occupation is not on the current ENS list.

2. Applicants between 45 and 50 years of Age

The age limit for ENS and RSMS visas will increase from 45 to 50 from 1 July 2012.

As a result, applicants between 45 and 50 will be able to qualify for an ENS or RSMS visa without needing to show Exceptional Circumstances.

3. Applicants over 60 years on 457 visas

Under current arrangements, it is extremely difficult for applicants aged over 60 to obtain an ENS or RSMS visa. Under current DIAC policy, applicants must show that they will make a significant economic contribution to Australia and have a very high salary level ($213,000 or more).

From 1 July 2012, applicants who have worked for their employer for the last 4 years on a 457 visa and who have a salary of over $118,000 should be eligible for an exemption to the age requirement.

This will make it far more possible for applicants over 60 to qualify for migration under the Employer Nomination Scheme.

 

April 9, 2012

Australia is the land of work, skill and education for the international students. Many foreign students prefer to live and study abroad in Australia. Australia offers a high quality practical educational environment for international or foreign students to obtain skills and qualifications in any of the related areas in the field of engineering and technology.

International students can enrol in Information Technology, Civil, Software /Hardware, Manufacturing, Multimedia, Automobile, Mechanical, Aeronautical/ Aerospace, Applied Physics, Architectural, Chemical and Environmental Engineering courses. Many technical and engineering colleges in Australia offer technical and further Education (TAFE) programs, university degrees and postgraduate degree courses to students in different engineering disciplines.

Australia educational consultants provide useful information to foreign and international students and also guide them to choose right kind of engineering course from best college and university.Australia educational consultants also guide international students to get admission in the college located at a city university in one of the state capitals or choose a best university located in one of the main regional centres throughout Australia.

Australia provides multicultural and excellent study environment for students to study and so that they feel comfortable to mix in a diverse and tolerant environment. Australian education counselling provides the information of many engineering colleges in Australia. It also offers the international student a wide range of choices of place to study, strength and size of engineering college and educational approach of the engineering institute.

Apart from Study, the technical and engineering colleges in Australia also allows international students to participate in most important research and development activities. Australian education counselling has also running various educational programs in which the students can interact more closely with industry people so that they know how to deal with real-world engineering?

Engineers educated from Australian universities can be found working all over in today’s worldwide community. For example South and East Asia where large numbers of engineers and technical people who have studied from various Australian Universities, Colleges and Institutes will be found at very senior positions in different software, mechanical and chemical industries, or in government sectors, with few of them have their own well established businesses.

If we compared globally, Australia has more engineering graduates and post graduate people per million than the UK, France Germany, USA, Sweden and India. Many universities offer postgraduate degree courses to study abroad in Australia in areas of engineering.

Summary: Australia offers a high quality practical educational environment for international or foreign students to obtain skills and qualifications in any of the related areas in the field of engineering and technology like Information Technology, Civil, Software /Hardware, Manufacturing, Multimedia, Automobile, Mechanical engineering fields to get better career and high senior positions.

 

Source: goodarticles.in April 5th, 2012

April 4, 2012

 

A NEW website will let students compare universities on different criteria and the Government already is planning its expansion.

The  MyUniversity site launched in Canberra today gives information such as offered courses, student-to-staff ratios, fees, student satisfaction, and access to student services and campus facilities.

Tertiary Education Minister Chris Evans said the Government was already working on expanding and refining the information available to include employment outcomes and better data on student experiences.

The site soon will include more information about what potential employers are looking for.

Providing connections would ensure a broad education as well as training for the jobs emerging in the economy,” Senator Evans said.

 

“So they can get the full picture not only of the experience at university but also what that means for their employment prospects,” he said at a high school in Canberra.

Much of the information on the MyUniversity site has been available already but Senator Evans said a student had to be “very determined” to find it all.

Year 12 student Briana Duck said her first look at the website had been very helpful.

“It gives heaps of statistics and you can compare the information you want,” the Canberra student said.

“Where they are, how many students go and complete it (their course) and get jobs further on.”

Briana is hoping to study forensics and said the website let her find which universities offered the course, how long each degree took and how many students studied it.

Senator Evans said each university vetted information before it appeared on the site to ensure accuracy.

There had been some sensitivity, particularly about releasing staff-to-student ratios, but the minister said these were important issues to students.

“If students start making choices around those issues and that affects enrolments, I’m sure you’ll find universities responding,” he said.

Briana said it was something she would consider in choosing where to study.

“You want to know how much attention you’re going to get and how many places there are,” she said.

The website has been well received by universities and tertiary students, but both said there was more work to do.

Universities Australia, the sector’s peak body, said prospective students must be able to have confidence in the information’s accuracy.

“Getting it right is also essential for the reputation of universities operating in an increasingly competitive market brought on by the demand-driven enrolment system,” chief executive Belinda Robinson said.

“We don’t believe the MyUniversity website is there yet, particularly in relation to attrition rates, staff-student ratios, the entry score cut-off search function, course mapping and searchability.”

The National Union of Students said the right kind of information was being provided but more detail was needed.

“Students have a right to know whether they will be enrolling at a campus with a culture of student-run student life and student services,” president Donherra Walmsley said.

“We believe it is essential that this information be included in the next iteration of the MyUniversity website.”

Ultimately students would benefit because universities would no longer be able to hide behind their brand.

 

Source: AAP April 03, 2012

March 23, 2012

 

The international education sector is one of Australia’s largest export industries and is important to Australia in supporting bilateral ties with key partner countries, supporting employment in a broad range of occupations throughout the Australian economy, as well as delivering high-value skills to the economy.

In December 2010, the Australian Government appointed the Hon Michael Knight AO to conduct the first strategic review of the student visa program to help enhance the quality, integrity and competitiveness of the student visa program.

On 7 March 2011, Mr Knight released a discussion paper and encouraged interested parties to make a written submission to the review.
See: Student Visa Program Review Discussion Paper (212KB PDF file)

There were 200 submissions received and they are available on the department’s website.
See: Submissions Received by the Review Team

Report released

Mr Knight reported to the government on 30 June 2011 with 41 recommendations. On 22 September 2011, the Minister for Immigration and Citizenship, Chris Bowen MP, and Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills, Jobs and Workplace Relations, Senator Chris Evans, released Mr Knight’s report, Strategic Review of the Student Visa Program 2011.
See: Strategic Review of the Student Visa Program 2011 (1.7MB PDF file)

Government’s response

The government supports in principle all of Mr Knight’s recommendations, however some recommendations will be modified in places to enhance the performance of the Australian education sector and to better safeguard the integrity of the visa system.
See: Boost to International Education Sector in Response to Knight Review – Media release

The fact sheet on the Government Response to the Knight Review of the Student Visa Program is available on the department’s website.
See: Fact Sheet – Government Response to the Knight Review of the Student Visa Program ( 72KB PDF file)

All of Mr Knight’s recommendations are available, as well as the actual or planned implementation dates.
See: Knight Review of the Student Visa Program—Recommendations with Expected Implementation Date

Stage one implementation

Stage one implementation of the Knight Review changes commenced on 5 November 2011. The following fact sheet details these changes.
See:
Fact Sheet – Stage One Implementation of the Knight Review Changes to the Student Visa program ( 66KB PDF file)
Students to Benefit as Knight Review Changes Rolled Out – Media release

Stage two implementation

The majority of the stage two Knight Review changes commenced on 24 and 26 March 2012. This includes streamlined visa processing for certain university applicants from 24 March 2012. Other stage two Knight Review changes are proposed to commence later in 2012 and in early 2013.
See:
Fact Sheet – Stage Two Implementation of the Knight Review Changes to the Student Visa Program ( 68KB PDF file)
Changes to Boost International Education – Media Release

One of the recommendations agreed to by government is the introduction of new post-study work arrangements, which are planned to come into effect in 2013.

On 30 November 2011, the government announced plans to extend eligibility of the post-study work visa. In addition to university graduates, the new post-study work arrangements are to be extended to Bachelor, Masters by coursework, Masters by research and PhD degree graduates from other education providers accredited to offer degree level programs in Australia.

The government also announced that graduates must complete their qualifications as a result of meeting the Australian study requirement which requires at least two academic years’ study in Australia.
See:
Government Extends Support for International Education – Media Release
Australian Study Requirement

To address recommendation 24 of the Knight Review, the government has recently introduced a Bill into Parliament that proposes to cease the automatic cancellation of student visas. 
See: Improvements for Existing Student Visa Holders ( 76KB PDF file)

Discussion paper on the Review of the Student Visa Assessment Level Framework (Recommendation 32)

Comments on the discussion paper on the Review of the Student Visa Assessment Level Framework closed on 16 March 2012.
See: Discussion Paper on the Review of the Student Visa AL Framework (201KB PDF file)

Frequently asked questions

The following information package provides further detail on the Knight Review changes to the student visa program.
See:
The University Sector – Streamlined Processing ( 88KB PDF file)
Post-Study Work Arrangements ( 75KB PDF file)
Genuine Temporary Entrant Requirement ( 94KB PDF file)
Vocational Education and Training (VET), Schools and Non-Award Sectors ( 87KB PDF file)
English Language Intensive Courses for Overseas Students (ELICOS) Sector ( 76KB PDF file)
Higher Degree by Research (HDR) Sector ( 79KB PDF file)
More Flexible Work Conditions ( 68KB PDF file)
Improvements for Existing Student Visa Holders ( 76KB PDF file)
Visa Processing Improvements ( 75KB PDF file)
Education Visa Consultative Committee (EVCC) ( 49KB PDF file)
Review of Assessment Level Framework ( 62KB PDF file)

See also: 
Review of Assessment Level Framework – Terms of Reference ( 59KB PDF file)
List of External Reference Group Members – Revi
ew of Assessment Level Framework

 

March 23, 2012

 

The Minister for Immigration and Citizenship, Chris Bowen MP, today announced key changes to the student visa program recommended by the Knight Review will commence from 24 March, as part of the government’s commitment to position Australia as a preferred study destination for international students.

‘International education plays a vital role in a growing economy, educational outcomes and Australia’s diplomatic engagement with other countries, so it’s important that we give it the best possible support,’ Mr Bowen said.

‘From 24 March, we are implementing streamlined visa processing arrangements for prospective students enrolled in Bachelor, Masters or Doctoral degrees at participating universities, making the application process simpler and faster.’

In recognition of these institutions’ track record, university students — regardless of their country of origin — will be treated as though they are lower risk and will need to submit less evidence in support of their visa application, similar to the current assessment level (AL) 1.

‘Universities in Australia have embraced the opportunity to sign up to the arrangements, which are expected to help boost international enrolments for semester two 2012 and beyond,’ Mr Bowen said.

From 26 March, the government will provide more flexible work conditions for all student visa holders, which will also provide more flexibility for their employers.

In recognition of the importance of the higher degree by research sector, the government will also allow postgraduate research (subclass 574) visa holders to work an unlimited amount of hours per week once their course has commenced, which will mean they can engage in employment related to their research.

Other Knight Review changes to be implemented from 24 March include:

Improved access to English language study for schools sector visa applicants and for student guardian visa holders

Removal of the requirement for higher risk schools sector visa applicants to provide evidence of an English language proficiency test.

In line with the Knight Review recommendations, the minister today introduced legislation to Parliament to abolish the automatic visa cancellation process for international students.

The Student Legislation Amendment (Student Visas) Bill will reduce complexity and uncertainty for students and provide for fairer, more efficient monitoring and compliance processes.

 

Thursday, 22 March 2012

March 20, 2012

 

NSW will be offered an extra $561 million during the next five years if it agrees to an overhaul of its vocational education training sector to produce the workers necessary to keep the economy moving.

The money will be part of $1.75 billion extra the Prime Minister, Julia Gillard, will put on the table for the states at the Council of Australian Governments meeting next month to encourage all states and territories to agree to the reforms.

NSW was already in line for $2.3 billion in skills funding from 2012-13 to 2016-17, which means the extra money will push that total close to $2.9 billion.

Ms Gillard has been warning that the nation needs to increase its skills base if the workforce is to adapt to the changing economy.

She has already announced that HECS-style loans – previously provided only to university students – will be made available for advanced diploma courses in fields such as information technology, childcare, aged care, engineering and telecommunications.

Other diploma students will be eligible for subsidies of up to $7800 a year.

Today, Ms Gillard is expected to expand significantly on extra inducements and reforms she wants the states to adopt when COAG meets on April 13.

These are expected to include more harmonisation of courses across Australia, more incentives to upgrade skills, and partnerships with industries seeking specific skilled workers.

A report to be released today, titled Skills for all Australians, says the government will expect “additional effort and system reform” in return for the money it is offering.

“The Commonwealth strongly believes that our training system must be aligned with industry and focused on meeting the needs of our changing economy,” it says.

“Simply funding additional training places is no longer an adequate response in an environment where international and domestic pressures are changing the way we do business.

“All governments must work to create the national training system … that more businesses can partner with to develop their workforces, where more students can get the basic qualification they need for a decent job in a higher-skills economy, where disadvantaged individuals and regions participate fully.”

Last week government modelling by Skills Australia showed a stark shortage of skilled workers in Sydney and regional NSW.

It found that by 2015 NSW would need an extra 180,000 trade or certificate workers, and 144,000 more diploma-qualified workers to meet demand. Almost 4.1 million people nationally, and 1.3 million in NSW, could be earning up to $10,000 a year more if they qualified to work in a growth sector of the economy.

The government says the extra $1.75 billion will not stop it returning the budget to surplus next financial year.

Source:  National Times  PHILLIP COOREY   19 Mar, 2012

March 20, 2012
March 20, 2012

NORTH Coast TAFE has welcomed a Federal Government proposal that would give TAFE students the chance to defer their course fees interest-free in a HECS-style system.

Under the Skills Plan proposal the government would abolish upfront fees for students in vocational education and training (VET) and provide a National Training Entitlement that would give every Australian a guaranteed place in training up to their first Certificate III.

The reforms are expected to cost the government $1.75 billion.

Federal MP Justine Elliot has applauded the announcement saying it will give Tweed residents without a post-school qualification the chance to up-skill and earn more money.

“No longer will local people be locked out of a higher qualification simply because they can’t pay the fees upfront,” Mrs Elliot said.

“Opening up a HECS-style system will put those wanting to undertake vocational education and training on a level footing with university students for the first time.”

The offer is particularly appealing to rural and regional North Coast TAFE students who rely on completing a TAFE course before moving to metropolitan universities or starting distance education.

Institute director Elizabeth McGregor is looking forward to more discussion of the proposal at a meeting of the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) next month.

“COAG has previously set a target of doubling by 2020 the number of people completing higher level VET qualifications,” Ms McGregor said.

“We in North Coast TAFE welcome the thrust of these proposals as they recognise that the capabilities developed through undertaking TAFE diplomas or advanced diploma are equally important to our nation’s productivity as university qualifications, and that students studying them are equally deserving of financial assistance.

“Apart from providing industry recognised, job-ready skills, a higher level TAFE course also gives a significant head start towards a university degree.

“Workers with a TAFE certificate or diploma could earn up to $10,000 a year extra or $400,000 more over their working lifetime.”

The Skills Plan will also see the release of a new My Skills website later this year which will allow students to compare courses, fees, providers and the quality of training on offer.

 

Source: mydailynews.com.au Rebecca Masters | 20th March 2012

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