November 16, 2010

 

On 11th November the Minister for Immigration and Citizenship, the Hon Chris Bowen MP, announced the government’s intention to implement a new points test applying to certain skilled migration applications made on or after 1 July 2011.

The new points test will not apply to unfinalised applications lodged prior to 1 July 2011.

It is proposed that a new points test for skilled migration visa applications will be introduced on 1 July 2011. It complements the series of reforms the Australian Government announced in February 2010.

The new points test is focused on selecting highly skilled people to deliver a more responsive and targeted migration program. It was developed following a review of the current points test, which considered submissions from a variety of experts and the wider Australian community.

The new points test balances the different factors that are considered when determining whether someone will be granted a skilled migration visa. It will deliver the best and brightest skilled migrants by emphasising high level qualifications, better English language levels and extensive skilled work experience.

The new points test will continue to award points for study in Australia, including regional study, community languages, partner skills and completing an approved Professional Year. Points will no longer be awarded on the basis of an applicant’s occupation, but all applicants must still nominate an occupation on the applicable Skilled Occupation List.

 

Under the new points test, points will no longer be awarded on the basis of occupation. Applicants will still be required to nominate a skilled occupation and provide a satisfactory skills assessment from the relevant Australian assessment authority for that occupation.

The equal weighting of occupations will have the added benefit of not distorting the study choices of international students. For more information of the point test see: http://www.immi.gov.au/skilled/general-skilled-migration/pdf/points-fact.pdf .

The Minister’s speech includes this statement: “Educating the future leaders of our regional partners can make an important contribution to our diplomatic efforts long into the future. The measures I’m announcing today strike the appropriate balance between recognising valuable overseas qualifications and encouraging study at Australian institutions.”

For the complete speech see: http://www.chrisbowen.net/media-centre/allNews.do?newsId=3889 .

For further details:

August 12, 2010

September Intake - TAFE NSW

Course Name

Certificate 3 in Children Services
CRICOS Code 069332K
National Code CHC30708

Course Number

18206

Work placement

Workplace learning (‘on-the-job’ training) of a minimum of
100 hours is required for the achievement of competencies
to receive the Certificate 3 in Children’s Services (18206). A
teacher will secure a work placement for you and assist in
the organisation of the workplace learning and associated
workplace activities in line with TAFE NSW policy.
To be employed as a worker in child care services, you
must be aged over 18. In NSW you need a minimum of
one year’s experience, gained after the qualification, to
apply for the role of an authorised supervisor of a child care
centre. Children’s services regulations vary in each state of
Australia.

Go to www.tafetr.com for further information.

 

Duration

Course commences Monday 13 September 2010 and
finishes 28 January 2011.

August 5, 2010

 

 

These Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) are designed for clients who have already lodged an application for General Skilled Migration (GSM). These FAQs should be read with the information about the priority processing arrangements.

Please note: These FAQs will continue to be updated in response to common questions received from clients about the changes.

The Minister for Immigration and Citizenship, Senator Chris Evans, set new priority processing arrangements for certain skilled migration visas on 14 July 2010. These priority processing arrangements apply to all applications already lodged with the Department of Immigration and Citizenship, as well as all future applications.

QI What is priority processing?

Priority processing refers to the order in which the department considers skilled migration applications. Section 51 of the Migration Act 1958 gives the Minister for Immigration and Citizenship powers to consider and finalise visa applications in an order of priority that the Minister considers appropriate. Departmental officers must follow this ministerial direction, which applies to both new applications and those applications awaiting a decision.

Q2 What are the changes to the skilled migration visa processing priorities?

The Minister has set new priority processing arrangements which apply to the following visas:

 

  • Employer Nomination Scheme (ENS)
  • Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme (RSMS)
  • Certain General Skilled Migration (GSM) visas.

 

Under the arrangements, processing priorities (with the highest priority listed first) are:

 

  1. Applications from people who are employer sponsored under the ENS and the RSMS.
  2. Applications from people who are nominated by a state or territory government agency with a nominated occupation that is specified on that state or territory’s state migration plan.
  3. Applications from people who have nominated an occupation on the new Skilled Occupation List (SOL) – Schedule 3 in effect from 1 July 2010.
  4. All other applications are to be processed in the order in which they are received.

 

Q3 Which GSM visas are affected by priority processing?

The following GSM visas are affected by priority processing:

 

  • Skilled — Independent subclass 175
  • Skilled — Independent subclass 176
  • Skilled — Regional Sponsored subclass 475
  • Skilled — Regional Sponsored subclass 487
  • Skilled — Independent Regional subclass 495
  • Skilled — Designated Area-sponsored (Provisional) subclass 496
  • Graduate — Skilled subclass 497
  • Skilled — Onshore Independent New Zealand Citizen subclass 861
  • Skilled — Onshore Australian-sponsored New Zealand Citizen subclass 862
  • Skilled — Onshore Designated Area-sponsored New Zealand Citizen subclass 863
  • Skilled — Independent Overseas Student subclass 880
  • Skilled — Australian-sponsored subclass 881
  • Skilled — Designated Area-sponsored Overseas Student subclass 882
  • Skilled — Independent subclass 885
  • Skilled — Sponsored subclass 886.

 

Q4 Which GSM visa subclasses are exempt from priority processing?

The following visa subclasses are exempt from priority processing:

 

  • Skilled — Recognised Graduate subclass 476
  • Skilled — Graduate subclass 485
  • Skilled — Designated Area — Sponsored (Residence) subclass 883
  • Skilled — Regional subclass 887.

 

Applications for these visa subclasses will be processed in the order in which they are received by the department.

Q5 What applications are not affected by the Direction or priority processing?

The following applications are not affected:

 

  • Applications that have been remitted by the Migration Review Tribunal for reconsideration.
  • Applications where it is readily apparent that the criteria for grant of the visa would not be satisfied.
  • Applications by visa applicants claiming to be a member of the family unit of a person who holds a visa granted on the basis of satisfying the primary criteria in Schedule 2 to the Regulations and who did not make a combined application with that person.
  • Visa applications for a Skilled – Regional Sponsored Subclass 487 visa where the applicant holds a Skilled – Independent Regional (Provisional) Subclass 495 visa, Skilled – Designated Area-sponsored
  • (Provisional) Subclass 496 visa, Skilled – Regional Sponsored Subclass 487 visa or Skilled – Regional
  • Sponsored Subclass 475 visa at the time they apply.

 

Q6 The new direction refers to Schedule 3 of the Skilled Occupation list (SOL) what do these schedules refer to?

The Skilled Occupation List (SOL) is a list of occupations that are accepted for general skilled migration. Applicants must have a nominated occupation which is on the SOL that applies to them at the time they apply. The recent changes to skilled migration have included generous transitional arrangements for some people. These arrangements require that the previous version of the SOL be kept available for those people so they can access their transitional arrangements. The changes also included a change in the way occupations are classified, from ASCO to ANZSCO. This change required that the previous version of the SOL be provided in both the ASCO and ANZSCO coding.

The different SOLs are distinguished by different schedules, as follows:

• the SOL in existence prior to 1 July 2010 in ASCO code (schedule 1) — applies only to GSM applicants who lodged their application prior to 1 July 2010.

• the SOL in existence prior to 1 July 2010 in ANZSCO code (schedule 2) — applies to GSM applicants who are eligible for transitional arrangements and who lodge their application before 1 January 2013.

• the current SOL (schedule 3) in effect from 1 July 2010 — applies to all new GSM applications, including applicants eligible for transitional arrangements if they prefer to use it.

• the State and Territory SOL (schedule 4 ) — applies only to GSM applicants nominated by a State or Territory government under a State Migration Plan.

More information about change to the SOL are available from the departmental website. See: www.immi.gov.au/skilled/sol/

Information about the transitional arrangements is available from the departmental website. See: http://www.immi.gov.au/skilled/general-skilled-migration/pdf/faq-sol.pdf

Information about the department’s introduction of ANZSCO, which replaces ASCO in relation to skilled occupations, is available from the departmental website. See: www.immi.gov.au/employers/anzsco/

Q7 What is a State Migration Plan?

State Migration plans are developed by state or territory governments and include occupations that are in demand in an individual state or territory. Each state migration plan is approved by the Minister for Immigration and Citizenship. State migration plans are currently being developed and are expected to come into effect during the second half of 2010. A notice will be put on the department’s website when plans come into effect.

Q8 Why have the processing priorities changed?

The priority processing arrangements take account of the changes to the SOL that came into effect on 1 July 2010, as well as the revocation of the Migration Occupations in Demand List (MODL) and the Critical Skills List (CSL). These changes to priority processing simplify previous arrangements. Many applicants will find that they are in a higher priority group. Some will have to wait longer for their visas to be processed.

Q9 When did the changes to priority processing come into effect?

The changes took effect from 14 July 2010 and apply to applications lodged with the department on or after this date. The changes also apply to applications lodged before 14 July 2010 that have not been finalised.

Q10 Is there any difference in the processing priorities that apply to onshore and offshore visa subclasses?

No, the processing priorities apply to both onshore and offshore applications. Processing times, however may vary for onshore and offshore applications

Q11 What will happen to applications in the final stages of processing where the department has requested applicants to provide health and character clearances?

The new arrangements apply to all visa applications, including those in the final stages of processing. Applications in lower priority groups cannot be processed further until those in higher priority groups are finalised in accordance with the priority processing direction.

Q12 Can I request that my application be given higher priority outside of the Minister’s Direction?

No, please do not contact the department to request your application be exempt from the priority processing direction. Case officers must adhere to the Minister for Immigration and Citizenship’s priority processing direction.

Q13 My nominated occupation is Accountant but I was not eligible for the CSL. What level of priority processing will I receive?

The occupation of Accountant is included on Schedule 3 of the current Skilled Occupation List (SOL) and therefore your application will be in priority group 3, except those already included in priority groups 1 or 2.

Q14 My application is in priority category 4. When can I expect to have my application finalised?

Applicants with nominated occupations in priority group 4 will have a long wait for visa processing. The department’s Client Service Charter will be updated shortly with information about current estimated processing times. See: Visas for Migrating to Australia as a Skilled Person (http://www.immi.gov.au/about/charters/clientservices-charter/visas/8.0.htm)

Q15 I have been nominated by a state or territory government but my occupation is not listed on a State Migration Plan. What level of priority processing will my application receive?

If your nominated occupation is not on your state or territory’s State Migration Plan, your application will be processed on the basis of your nominated occupation. Applicants who have nominated an occupation that is included in Schedule 3 of the current SOL are in priority processing group 3. An applicant with a nominated occupation that is included only in Schedule 1 or Schedule 2 of the current SOL is in priority processing group 4.

Q16 If my nominated occupation is not in Schedule 3 of the SOL in effect at 1 July 2010 what level of priority processing will I receive?

Applicants with a nominated occupation that is included only in Schedule 1 or Schedule 2 of the current SOL are in priority processing group 4, unless they have applied for ENS or RSMS or have a state or territory nomination in an occupation on a state migration plan.

Q17 I applied for GSM. If my nominated occupation is not in Schedule 3 of the SOL in effect at 1 July 2010 can my application receive higher priority processing?

Yes if you are nominated by a state or territory government under a state migration plan. Applicants who lodged before 1 July 2010 that have been nominated by a state or territory government agency in an occupation that is subsequently specified in their nominating state or territory’s state migration plan will receive processing under priority group 2.

Q18 What are my options if my application is in priority group 4 and I have applied for an onshore GSM visa?

The options available are:

 

  • continue to live and work in Australia (if your visa permits) while you await a decision on your visa application
  • assess your eligibility for an employer sponsored visa or a nomination by a state or territory government under a state migration plan agreed to by the minister
  • apply for another substantive visa
  • withdraw your application and depart Australia.

 

Please note: Some of these options would require the lodgement of a new application and the payment of a new Visa Application Charge (VAC). If you choose to withdraw your application you will not be entitled to a refund of your VAC.

For applications lodged after 1 July 2010, a new application may be required if you have obtained a state or territory nomination after lodgement. Please contact the skilled processing centre. See: http://www.immi.gov.au/contacts/australia/processing-centres/adelaide-skilled.htm

You may also seek an employer sponsorship under the Employer Nomination Scheme (ENS) or the Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme (RSMS).

More information about ENS and RSMS is available from the departmental website. See: www.immi.gov.au/skilled/skilled-workers/visa-permanent.htm

More information about estimated processing times are available from the departmental website. See: http://www.immi.gov.au/about/charters/client-services-charter/visas/8.0.htm

Q19 What are my options if my application is in priority group 4 and I applied for an offshore GSM visa?

The options available are:

 

  • continue to await a decision on your visa application
  • assess your eligibility for an employer sponsored visa, or nomination by a state or territory government under a state migration plan agreed to by the minister
  • withdraw your application.

 

Please note: Some of these options would require the lodgement of a new application and the payment of a new VAC. If you choose to withdraw your application you will not be entitled to a refund of your VAC.

For applications lodged after 1 July 2010, a new application may be required if you have obtained a state or territory nomination after lodgement. Please contact the skilled processing centre. See: http://www.immi.gov.au/contacts/australia/processing-centres/adelaide-skilled.htm

More information about estimated processing times is available from the departmental website. See: http://www.immi.gov.au/about/charters/client-services-charter/visas/8.0.htm

Q20 I am currently in Australia but my visa will expire before my application for an offshore GSM visa is finalised can I remain in Australia while my visa is processed?

Applicants for an offshore GSM visa are not eligible for an associated bridging visa to remain in Australia while their GSM application is being processed. You must apply for another visa to remain in Australia lawfully; otherwise you will need to depart Australia.

Q21 I am an onshore GSM applicant on a Bridging C visa which does not allow me to work. What can I do?

It is possible to be granted a Bridging C visa that will allow you to work. Please complete a Form 1005 Application for a bridging visa and submit this and supporting documentation evidencing financial hardship to the skilled processing centre processing your visa application.

Examples of the types of supporting documents required include a statement outlining income against outgoing expenses. Other examples may include living expenses such as accommodation costs and other bills.

Q22 I want to travel overseas but my onshore visa application has not been finalised. What should I do?

If you were granted a Bridging A visa when you applied for your GSM visa you may be able to lodge an application for a Bridging B visa to allow you to travel and return to Australia (within a specified period). A Bridging B visa is
generally not issued for longer than three months.

You must apply for a Bridging B visa at one of the department’s state or territory offices, not the skilled processing centre which is processing your GSM application. See: http://www.immi.gov.au/contacts/australia/

If you travel on a Bridging B visa, you do not need to contact the department on your return to Australia to apply for another bridging visa unless you have further need to travel outside Australia.

Note: If you travel out of Australia on another type of visa, your bridging visa will cease and you will need to apply for another bridging visa if you return to Australia.

Q23 I have a provisional or temporary GSM visa and my spouse/child now want to join me will they be able to do so?

Yes, applications for subsequent entrants for provisional GSM visas are exempt from priority processing arrangements.

These arrangements apply to the following GSM visas:

 

  • Skilled — Regional Sponsored subclass 475
  • Skilled — Recognised Graduate subclass 476
  • Skilled — Graduate subclass 485
  • Skilled — Regional Sponsored subclass 487
  • Skilled — Independent Regional subclass 495
  • Skilled — Designated Area-sponsored subclass 496.

 

Q24 Am I entitled to compensation if my visa application is taking longer to process than expected due to the new priority processing direction?

Compensation is not available for delays in processing.

Q25 Why do the rules keep changing?

The skilled migration program is designed to be responsive to the current economic climate and the needs of the Australian economy. The new priority processing arrangements complement other recent changes to skilled migration to ensure that the economy gets the skills it needs in a timely manner. Priority processing arrangements are always subject to further change in response to the economic climate and the demand for particular skills in the Australian economy.

Priority in the skilled migration program goes to those who can provide the skills Australia most needs, rather than those visa applicants who applied first. The Australian Government is aware that the priority processing arrangements impact on many applicants. These changes to priority processing simplify previous arrangements. Many applicants will find that they are in a higher priority group. Some will have to wait longer for their visas to be processed.

Q26 Isn’t priority processing retrospective legislation?

Priority processing is an administrative arrangement, and impacts on the order in which applications are considered. It is not retrospective legislation as it does not change the criteria for the grant of a GSM visa.

Useful documents

More information about the changes to the GSM program is available from the department’s website including the following information sheets.

See:

http://www.immi.gov.au/skilled/general-skilled-migration/pdf/new-list-of-occupations.pdf (101KB PDF file)

http://www.immi.gov.au/skilled/general-skilled-migration/pdf/faq-new-sol.pdf (87KB PDF file)

http://www.immi.gov.au/skilled/general-skilled-migration/pdf/options-not-eligible.pdf (71KB PDF file)

 

August 5, 2010

 

The Minister for Immigration has announced new processing priorities which apply from 14 July 2010 for General Skilled Migration and permanent employer sponsored visas.

These arrangements take account of the changes to the Skilled Occupation List (SOL) that came into effect on 1 July 2010, as well as the revocation of the Migration Occupation in Demand List (MODL) and the Critical Skills List (CSL).

Processing Priorities

There are 4 priority groups – from highest to lowest priority these are:

  • Employer Sponsored: RSMS and ENS are the highest priority
  • General Skilled applicants sponsored under a State Migration Plan
  • General Skilled applicants with an occupation on the new SOL
  • All other applicants

Processing Times

In addition, we also have indicative processing times:

ENS/RSMS:

  • ETA countries (Low Risk): 5 months
  • Non-ETA countries (High Risk): 7 months

State Migration Plan

  • Onshore: 6 months
  • Offshore: 12 months

New SOL:

Lodged prior to 1 July 2010:

  • Onshore: to be processed prior to 1 July 2011
  • Offshore: to be processed prior to 31 December 2011

Lodged after 1 July 2010:

  • Onshore: 18 months
  • Offshore: 18-24 months

Otherwise: to be processed after groups 1-3 are finalized

Exempt Visa Types

Not all skilled visas are subject to the new priorities. For instance, the following continue to be processed in the order received:

  • Skilled Graduate Subclass 4 js” type=”text/javascript”> 85 – 12 months
  • Skilled Recognised Graduate Subclass 476 – 7 months
  • Skilled Regional Subclass 887 – 5 months
  • Cases which have been refused and appealed successfully to the MRT (Migration Review Tribunal)
  • Subsequent entrants for Skilled Regional Sponsored and Skilled Graduate visas
  • Applications which clearly do not meet essential criteria and which are for refusal

Summary of Previous Changes

  • The Critical Skills List – introduced in January 2009 – has now been abolished and effectively replaced by a much shorter Skilled Occupations List which is now being used both to limit numbers of new applications and to prioritise applications already in the system.
  • Note that no State Migration Plans have yet been finalised. We understand that a number of states have completed their plans and are awaiting signature from the Minister of Immigration. As the government is currently in caretaker mode, ahead of the Federal Election on August 21, these may be a few months off coming into effect.
  • People who were sponsored by state or territory governments receive no priority due to this unless they are sponsored under a State Migration Plan. If the nominated occupation is not on the new SOL, the application would be at the lowest priority level – despite the fact that such applicants were previously at the highest priority level.
  • The changes are still positive for accountants – previously a minimum score of 7 in the IELTS test was required for priority to be given. Now, any applicant with a skills assessment as an accountant will be at least in priority group 3.
  • The indicative processing time for a Skilled Graduate subclass 485 visa is far longer than is reasonable. This type of visa is only valid for 18 months from the date of grant. On the positive side, the longer DIAC takes to process a 485 visa, the longer a student has to stay in Australia with full work rights.
  • People in the lowest priority group have reason to be concerned because the Minister has introduced a visa capping bill which would give him the ability to cancel visa applications from people meeting certain criteria (eg occupation). Given the number of people waiting for decisions on skilled visas, the Minister would be highly likely to exercise this power if the Visa Capping Bill is passed through Parliament.

 

 

 

 

July 30, 2010
July 30, 2010

Martin College are putting a special offer into the market for programs commencing 16th August and 20th September 2010.  This special offer is only available to any NEW bookings made for these 2 intakes to any of the MC Campuses in Australia – Sydney, Gold Coast or Brisbane (see below details of special offers).

Martin College Special Offers:

August 16th 2010:

  • Advanced Diploma of Management (50 weeks) – WAS $13,795 NOW ONLY $13,090*
  • Diploma of Marketing (20 weeks) – comprises of 5 core subjects + 3 elective subjects WAS $5,955 NOW ONLY $4,760*
  • Diploma of Business (20 weeks) – WAS $5,955 NOW ONLY $4,760*
  • Certificate IV in Business (15 weeks) – WAS $4,465 NOW ONLY $3,570*
  • Certificate IV & Diploma of Business (30 weeks) – WAS $10,420 NOW ONLY $8,330*
  • Certificate IV in Business & Diploma of Marketing (30 weeks) – WAS $10,420 NOW ONLY $8,330*
  • Diploma of Information Technology (45 weeks)
  • Diploma of Event Management (45 weeks)
  • Certificate III in Event Management (15 weeks) – WAS $4,465 NOW ONLY $3,570*
  • Diploma of Tourism (45 weeks)
  • Certificate III in Tourism (25 weeks)

September 20th 2010:

  • Advanced Diploma of Management (50 weeks) – WAS $13,795 NOW ONLY $13,090*
  • Diploma of Marketing (20 weeks) – comprises of 5 core subjects + 3 elective subjects WAS $5,955 NOW ONLY $4,760*
  • Diploma of Business (20 weeks) – WAS $5,955 NOW ONLY $4,760*
  • Certificate IV in Business (15 weeks) – WAS $4,465 NOW ONLY $3,570*
  • Certificate IV & Diploma of Business (30 weeks) – WAS $10,420 NOW ONLY $8,330*
  • Certificate IV in Business & Diploma of Marketing (30 weeks) – WAS $10,420 NOW ONLY $8,330*
  • Diploma of Event Management (45 weeks)
  • Certificate III in Event Management (15 weeks) – WAS $4,465 NOW ONLY $3,570*
  • Diploma of Tourism (45 weeks)
  • Certificate III in Tourism (25 weeks)
  • Diploma of Graphic Design (50 weeks)
  • Certificate IV in Design (25 weeks)

October 25th 2010:

  • Advanced Diploma of Management (50 weeks)
  • Diploma of Marketing (20 weeks) – comprises of 5 core subjects + 3 elective subjects
  • Diploma of Business (20 weeks)
  • Certificate IV in Business (15 weeks)
  • Certificate IV & Diploma of Business (30 weeks)
  • Certificate IV in Business & Diploma of Marketing (30 weeks)

November 29th 2010:

  • Advanced Diploma of Management (50 weeks)
  • Diploma of Marketing (20 weeks) – comprises of 5 core subjects + 3 elective subjects
  • Diploma of Business (20 weeks)
  • Certificate IV in Business (15 weeks)
  • Certificate IV & Diploma of Business (30 weeks)
  • Certificate IV in Business & Diploma of Marketing (30 weeks)
  • Diploma of Information Technology (45 weeks)

Nationality Mix (July)

Please find attached the latest Nationality Mix for July 2010.  Brisbane is showing a great diversity in its nationalities especially with the introduction of more Australian students (Now at 25%)at Martin College through the implementation of VET Fee-Help (Government assistance for Australian Citizens ONLY) these numbers should continue to grow over the coming months.

For further information, please contact me.

July 20, 2010
July 20, 2010

LIVE, WORK and STUDY in AUSTRALIA

MIGRATION TO AUSTRALIA
International Education Agency – Australia and Migration Professionals are working together to help you (and your family) live, work and study in Australia.

Contact us now at [email protected] for our personal visa eligibility assessment service which includes advice on all your options to live, work and study in Australia. Read More

July 16, 2010
July 16, 2010

Automotive/Mechanical in September

The skill requirements for Australia for the next few years have been identified, with Diesel Mechanics being highlighted as a key requirement.  This is a good sign for students who wish to put their skills into practice as the economy starts to wind back up again.

For further information about the course and availability in September, please contact us or fill out the form.

 

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July 14, 2010

High School English Study Abroad - Sydney and TAFE NSW

 

Locations :

High School English Study Abroad program is offered at 6 TAFE NSW campus locations:

  • Ultimo (Downtown Sydney)
  • Crows Nest (Inner Northern Sydney)
  • Liverpool (South-western Sydney)
  • Newcastle (2 hours north of Sydney)
  • Wollongong (1 hour south of Sydney)
  • Port Macquarie (Northern NSW – 40 minutes
    by plane from Sydney)

More information

July 13, 2010

IT Information TechnologyTAFENSW announced a massive promotion on Information technology courses. Students with sufficient Information Technology background and knowledge may reduce their study time 1 full semester, in other terms they can graduate in 3 semesters (1.5 years) instead of 4 semesters (2 years) which that means saving over 5000 AUD and 1 full semester. TAFENSW IT diploma graduates, receive 1 year exemption from most of the Australian Universities towards IT Degrees.

July 8, 2010

The jobs market continues to grow at a blockbuster pace and keeps the Reserve Bank on course to resume raising interest rates once it is satisfied Europe’s troubles have subsided.

New labour force data released on Thursday – showing another 45,900 people had found work last month – coincided with a warning from the International Monetary Fund (IMF) that downside risks to world economic growth have intensified.

In its World Economic Outlook Update released in Hong Kong on Thursday, the IMF has upgraded its world growth forecast for 2010 because of “stronger activity during the first half of the year”.

“(But) downside risks have risen sharply amid renewed financial turbulence,” it said.

The 45,900 seasonally adjusted jump in Australian employment in June was three times larger than predicted by economists, and included a further 18,400 people finding full-time work.

The jobless rate was 5.1 per cent in June, unchanged from May after revisions, and having been originally reported as 5.2 per cent.

The rate is the lowest level since January 2009, Australian Bureau of Statistics data show.

“Australia’s strong labour force figures stand in stark contrast to the stubbornly high unemployment rates still being experienced in many other advanced economies, where the aftershocks from the crisis are continuing to reverberate,” Employment Minister Simon Crean said in a statement.

The strength of the report saw financial markets price out any chance of an interest rate cut this year, a move that had been toyed with given the uncertainty generated by Europe’s debt problems.

RBS Australia senior economist Felicity Emmett said the Reserve Bank may “sit on its hands” if global financial markets continue to sharply deteriorate, but she thought a rate cut was unlikely unless the world economy slipped back into recession.

“The ongoing strength in the labour market confirms our view that the RBA still has a tightening bias, given that falling unemployment is likely to put pressure on wages with the potential to add to inflationary pressures next year,” Ms Emmett said.

The IMF has maintained its previous growth forecasts for Australia due to “still-robust commodity prices boosting private domestic demand”.

It predicts growth of 3.0 per cent in 2010, accelerating to 3.5 per cent in 2011, as it did in April.

It has revised up its growth forecast for world growth to 4.6 per cent in 2010 from 4.2 per cent previously, while leaving its 2011 forecast at 4.3 per cent.

“The new forecasts hinge on implementation of polices to rebuild confidence and stability, particularly in the euro area,” it said.

Treasurer Wayne Swan said the IMF report showed Australia remains a “world leader” in the global recovery.

“Together with today’s strong employment figures, the IMF’s report shows the Australian economy is still well ahead of the curve,” he said.

Mr Swan said the Australian economy was well placed to benefit from its proximity and links to the world’s fastest growing region – Asia.

The IMF said Asia had only limited direct financial linkages to the most vulnerable euro area economies.

“But a stall in the European recovery that spilled over to global growth would affect Asia through both trade and financial channels.”

In IMF’s accompanying update of it Global Financial Stability Report it said while the most acute market strains seen in late April and early May had “receded somewhat”, “market confidence remained fragile”.

Source: COLIN BRINSDEN, ECONOMICS CORRESPONDENT July 8, 2010 – AAP

 

July 8, 2010

 

 

From 1 July 2010 DIAC require overseas students to obtain OSHC for the proposed duration of their Student visa.

Where a student will be studying at more than one education provider, the requirement remains that the student must maintain health insurance for the duration of their visa. There cannot be a gap in the OSHC coverage.

If a student has already obtained OSHC for a 12 month period before 1 July they will not be asked to obtain further insurance. They will be expected to renew their policy when it expires.

Overseas Student Health Cover (OSHC) is intended to assist international students to meet the costs of medical and hospital care that they may need while in Australia.

A student visa can be granted up to the maximum duration outlined below:

Visa duration is 10 months or less – The visa will usually be granted up to one month longer than the duration of the course.

Visa duration is longer than 10 Months – The visa will usually be granted up to two months longer that the duration of the course.

Visa duration is longer than 10 Months and finishing at the end of the Australian academic year (October – December) – The visa will usually be granted up to March 15 of the following year.

For all students submitting applications from July onwards, we will calculate the visa length and issue a statement of fees which reflects an OSHC amount as per the information above.

The start date for the OSHC will be from the course commencement date

To assist students who are now preparing to make fees payment and request their CoE’s it is advised that you contact the relevant Education Counsellor to obtain a revised statement showing the correct OSHC fees. Please ensure that this is requested prior to the student preparing their fees payment through TT or Bank Draft.

In the case where payment is received without the additional OSHC amount, the outstanding fees will be required prior to the CoE being issued

IEAA help students to get their OSHC free of any additional service charge . Should you have any question, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Additional information can be found attached or at http://www.immi.gov.au/students/_pdf/oshc-faq.pdf

 

June 4, 2010

The Sydney Business School (SBS) of the Wollongong University will be touring Asia

 

 

The Sydney Business School (SBS) of the Wollongong University will be touring Asia, Latin America and Europe again this year as part of the QS Annual MBA Tour.

In July, SBS will be exhibiting in the following locations:

Location                       Date                      Time                     Venue

New Delhi                    10 July 2010         2-6.00pm              Hyatt Regency

Mumbai                        12 July 2010         5-9.00pm              Taj Lands End

Shanghai                      15 July 2010         5-9.00pm              The Longemont Hotel

Beijing                          17 July 2010         2-6.00pm              The Kerry Centre Hotel

 

Further information about the fairs can be found at www.topmba.com/mba-tour .

Please keep this in mind when approached by a student with an interest in SBS, as we would welcome their visit to our stand.

 


Student Testimonials

 

Abraham Nyilika

Geologist, BHP Billiton

Graduated 2009 – Master of Project Management

“My study at SBS has enriched my life, not only in terms of the knowledge I gained from my study but also from the contacts and friendships established with classmates from so many countries. The program has enhanced my planning and scheduling skills. These skills have not only become a key component of my role within BHP, but have allowed me to add real and practical value to the group.”

 

 

Peter Buckley

Operations Manager, Thomas & Coffey

Completing a Master of Business Administration

“The Sydney Business School was an obvious choice in my selection for a business school to complete a Master of Business Administration; for the quality of academic staff, international recognition of degree, flexibility of study and camaraderie among the MBA cohort.”

May 24, 2010

TAFENSW announced a massive promotion on Information technology courses. Students with sufficient Information Technology background and knowledge may reduce their study time 1 full semester, in other terms they can graduate in 3 semesters (1.5 years) instead of 4 semesters (2 years) which that means saving over 5000 AUD and 1 full semester.

 

TAFENSW IT diploma graduates, receive 1 year exemption from most of the Australian Universities towards IT Degrees.

 

 

May 17, 2010

Today the Minister for Immigration and Citizenship, Senator Chris Evans, announced the list of occupations included in the new Skilled Occupation List (SOL). The introduction of a new list of occupations is part of a package of reforms that reflects the Government’s commitment to a labour market demand-driven Skilled Migration Program.

 

This will affect all applications for General Skilled Migration from 1 July 2010, with only a few exceptions.

 

See link attached, http://www.immi.gov.au/skilled/general-skilled-migration/pdf/new-list-of-occupations.pdf

 

 

February 7, 2010

On 8 February 2010, the Minister for Immigration and Citizenship, Senator Chris Evans, announced the following changes to the General Skilled Migration program:

  • the outcomes of a review of the Migration Occupations in Demand List (MODL)
  • the replacement of the current Skilled Occupation List (SOL) in the second half of 2010
  • offshore GSM visas made before 1 September 2007 would be capped and ceased
  • priority processing arrangements
  • skills assessment requirements for GSM applicants nominating a trade occupation.

 

Australian government will tighten the list of target occupations and focus instead on healthcare, engineering and mining. The changes aimed at making skilled migration to be more effective to Australia’s needs.

 

The government will also abolish the current Migration on demand list (MODL) and publish a new Skill Occupation List (SOL).

 

The Immigration Minister, Chris Evans, said Australia needed a program that ”delivers the skills that are actually in demand in the economy, not just the skills that applicants present with”. ”If hospitals are crying out for and willing to sponsor nurses then of course they should have priority over the 12,000 unsponsored cooks who have applied and who, if all were granted visas, would flood the domestic market,” Senator Evans said.

 

”In recent years, the skilled migration program has been skewed as the pool of applicants has become dominated by a handful of occupations.” The current points system puts an overseas student with a short-term vocational qualification gained in Australia ahead of a Harvard-educated environmental scientist.

 

The bar was being raised for applicants without an Australian employer prepared to sponsor them. There were many occupations where the supply of qualified young Australians was adequate. But there were some jobs where there was a high demand for skills such as for hospital nurses, country doctors and resource sector employees.

 

Yesterday the Finance Minister, Lindsay Tanner, warned against a dramatic migration drop. The need for doctors, nurses, mining engineers, and IT specialists from overseas was ”crucial to our economy”, he told Channel Ten’s Meet the Press.

 

More information is available on the department’s website.

See:
Changes to the General Skilled Migration Program (362KB PDF file)
Outcomes of the Migration Occupation in Demand List Review – Frequently Asked Questions (373KB PDF file)
Onshore International Students (435KB PDF file)
Changes to Offshore General Skilled Migration Visa Applications Received Before 1 September 2007 (409KB PDF file)
Changes to the Current Skilled Occupation List (368KB PDF file)
Revoking the Critical Skills List (337KB PDF file)
Changes to Priority Processing Arrangements – Frequently Asked Questions (406KB PDF file)
General Skilled Migration (GSM) Points Test Review (377KB PDF file)
Changes to the Skills Assessment Requirements for GSM Applicants Nominating a Trade Occupation (417KB PDF file)

 

1 January 2010 legislative change – suitable skills assessment as a validity requirement for onshore GSM visas

Pre 1 January 2010, applicants applying for permanent migration based on one of the onshore General Skilled Migration (GSM) visa subclasses were required, at time of application, to provide evidence that they had applied for a skills assessment by the relevant assessing authority. At time of decision, a suitable skills assessment was required.

From 1 January 2010, applicants applying for one of the following onshore GSM visa subclasses will be required to have obtained a suitable skills assessment prior to applying for migration in order for the application to be valid and assessed by the department for a decision:

More information is available online. 
See: Skills Assessment Criterion as a Validity Requirement from 1 January 2010 for Onshore GSM Visas( 49KB PDF file)

 

January 22, 2010

 

The seasonally adjusted Olivier Job Index shows that IT job ads rose 0.46 per cent in December, month-on-month, closely tracking the market average of an overall rise of about 0.49 per cent.

IT job vacancies for December were 31 per cent lower than a year ago, but Olivier Group director Robert Olivier said that was still up 12 per cent from June, when pessimism over the GFC was at its peak. “My reading is that the last month’s unemployment figure surprised many but, given the way that ads have been performing in the last six months, we feel that there’s a positive employment trend,” Mr Olivier said.

December’s small rise in IT vacancies was attributable to a sharp drop in ads for desktop support roles (10.5 per cent) and technical writers (4.8 per cent) being offset by leaps in roles for sales and marketing professionals (8.6 per cent) and software developers.

Mr Olivier said the shift in the mix of vacancy types might indicate the mood in the IT sector was turning more optimistic.

“Management sales roles tend to be higher-paid roles so it may be that people have seen the confidence return,” he said.

While jobs in other sectors were more vulnerable to short-term market activity such as interest rates, IT vacancies tended to be linked to long-term economic radars due to the sector’s strategic nature. “IT projects have generally been kept on the backburner by organisations so it could be that as those constraints tend to ease up a bit . . . that people are getting more optimistic. The IT market has been slow to respond, compared to many other sectors, in the last six months.”

NSW and Victoria held the worst prospects for IT jobseekers during the month, with respective overall declines in vacancies of 0.86 per cent and 1.17 per cent, seasonally adjusted.

For further information, contact [email protected] for information and advice on which visa is best suited to you.

Source: The Australian January 19, 2010

January 22, 2010

 

The English language requirements for General Skilled Migration will be raised to a minimum IELTS score of 6.0 in each of the four components.

This change has already been introduced for offshore Skilled Regional Sponsored Visa application in July 2009 and will now affect onshore Skilled Regional Sponsored applications and all applicants who nominate a trade occupation from 1 January 2010.

The General Skilled Migration program is designed to attract migrants who are likely to obtain skilled employment when they arrive in Australia. The English language requirement is designed to support this objective and to ensure migrants have the best possible opportunity of settling into life and work in Australia.

The Australian Government uses the migration program to address skill shortages and meet the needs of the economy. In light of the current social and economic needs of Australia, the Government is able to adjust migration levels and entry requirements according to the current situation. Meeting the English language requirement is just one of many requirements to qualify for Skilled migration to Australia that can and does change through immigration policy.

For further information, contact [email protected] for information and advice on which visa is best suited to you.

January 22, 2010

 

AUSTRALIA faces a potential skills shortfall equivalent to 1.4 million workers by 2025 unless the workforce participation rate increases, according to new research that recommends raising the retirement age and boosting skilled migration.

The Workplace Futures report, to be presented to the Victoria Summit in Melbourne today, urges federal and state governments to lift barriers to older workers and disadvantaged groups participating in the workforce.

Despite predicting strong population growth based on the continuation of high birth and net migration rates, the paper warns the ageing population will mean a decline in workforce growth, exacerbating labour shortages to levels worse than between 2006 and 2008. The paper, prepared by the Victorian Employers Chamber of Commerce and Industry, says the shortfall in the state by 2025 could potentially be 440,000 workers, if retirement and migration rates remain at current levels. One of the authors, Darin Ritchie, said yesterday that if workforce trends did not change, the projected participation rate nationally in 2025 would drop from 65.2 per cent to 61.8 per cent. “To meet moderate levels of labour-demand growth, Australia’s participation rate would need to be 68 per cent,” he said. “This could potentially leave a shortfall of 1.4 million workers.

“To address this workforce deficit, Australia needs to raise the average retirement age, increase the workforce participation of disadvantaged groups, increase migration, or offset labour demand through productivity growth.”

The forecasts are based on Australian Bureau of Statistics population growth projections of 1.6 per cent, jobs growth of 1.9 per cent, and an unemployment rate at 4.5 per cent. “The prominence of demographic change and skill shortages has recently been overtaken by the economic downturn of the last 12 months,” the paper says. “With unemployment increasing over that period, it would be easy to assume we no longer have a labour or skills shortage problem. However, skills shortages still exist in many industries, and the reality of Australia’s ageing workforce means we face a structural deficit of workers over the next 15 years.”

 

Based on three months of interviews with representatives of government, business, education institutions and unions, the paper recommend policy changes, including the Victorian government raising or eliminating the workers compensation age limit.

Federal and state governments should work with universities to assess the potential for using overseas students to meet current and future skills and labour needs.

This could include increasing the ratio of postgraduate research in overseas student enrolments and improving job opportunities for graduate overseas students.

Wayne Kayler-Thomson, the chamber’s chief executive, said encouraging older and disadvantaged workers by removing barriers to training would lift workforce participation rates.

Source: .The Australian November 17, 2009

Ewin Hannan From:


 

January 14, 2010

Don’t miss this great opportunity to get free (normally $180) career and migration advice from the expert on both fields, Ms. Feriha GUNEY with Australian Education (Qualified Education Agent Counsellors: C102) and Australian Migration (Migration Agent Registration Number: 0960690) qualifications and with more then 10 years of experience in International Education.

To book an appointment, call 9232 7055 or email to [email protected] or [email protected]

• Do you know your next step towards education or migration goals? 
• Are you sure about your Course/ Education Provider Selection?
• What about your future career in Australia or in your country? Did you consider all options? 
• Do you know available courses, different careers and pathways with a range of fee and payment options? 
• Do you know options on skill assessments, temporary or permanent visas? 
• Use our Free Services on School Application and Admission, Change of Education provider, Change of Course, Visa renewals or transfers and for limited time only FREE Career and Migration Counselling!!!
• Let us to create your own education roadmap or immigration roadmap with possible strong and weak points and strategies to overcome?

Don’t Miss This Special Offer – Limited Time Only!!!

Expert on Australian Education, Student Visas and Skill Migration

International Education Agency – Australia

428 George Street | DYMOCKS BUILDING | Level 9-9B Sydney NSW 2000
T: +612 9232 7055 | [email protected] | [email protected]

www.mystudyinaustralia.com

December 9, 2009

 

Technical and Further Education or TAFE (pronounced [tæɪf]) institutions provide a wide range of predominantly vocational tertiary educationcourses in Australia, mostly qualifying courses under the National Training System/Australian Qualifications Framework/Australian Quality Training Framework. Fields covered include hospitality, tourism, construction, engineering, secretarial skills, visual arts, computer programming and community work.

 

Individual TAFE institutions (usually with many campuses) are known as either colleges or institutes, depending on the state or territory. TAFE colleges are owned, operated and financed by the various State and Territory Governments. This is in contrast to the higher education sector, whose funding is predominantly the domain of the Commonwealth government and whose universities are predominantly owned by the state governments.

 

  1. Qualifications awarded by TAFE colleges

TAFE colleges generally award qualifications up to the level of advanced diploma, which is below that of Bachelor degree within the Australian Qualifications Framework. In many instances TAFE study can be used as partial credit towards Bachelor degree-level university programs.

 

From 2002 the TAFE education sector has been able to offer Bachelor degrees and post-graduate diploma courses to fill niche areas, particularly vocationally focused areas of study based on industry needs. As at June 2009 10 TAFE colleges (mainly in Victoria, but also Western Australia, ACT, and Queensland) now confer their own degree-level awards and post graduate diplomas, though not beyond the level of Bachelor degree; this practice is somewhat controversial due to the blurring of once clearly defined boundaries between sectors.[1][2]


Students who enroll in these undergraduate degree courses at TAFE are required to pay full fees and are not entitled to Commonwealth Government supported student fee loans. While Universities have the ability and power to design and offer their own degree courses, each TAFE degree course must be assessed and approved by the Higher Education Accreditation Committee (HEAC).[1]


TAFEs in some states can also teach senior high school qualifications, like the VCE and the HSC. Some universities, e.g. Charles Darwin University and Swinburne University of Technology, offer TAFE courses; these are funded by the local state and territory governments. Some High Schools also deliver courses developed and accredited by TAFEs.

 

Some private institutions also offer courses from TAFEs, however they more commonly offer other vocational education and training courses.

 

Note that many Australians refer to all sub-degree courses as ‘TAFE’ courses, no matter what institution creates or delivers the course. Before the 1990s, the TAFEs had a near monopoly in the sector. TAFE courses provide students an opportunity for certificate, diploma, and advanced diploma qualifications in a wide range of areas.

 

  1. Links to immigration outcomes

Taking TAFE courses may entitle the trainee to be eligible for the skilled immigration program of Australia [3]. This results in large numbers of international students who have enrolled into TAFE courses for seeking immigration outcomes.

 

  1. TAFE colleges by state/territory

In most cases, TAFE campuses are grouped into TAFE institutions along geographic lines. Most TAFEs are given a locally recognised region of the country where they exclusively operate covering a wide range of subjects.

 

A few TAFEs specialise in a single area of study. These are usually found near the middle of the capital cities, and service the whole state or territory. For example, the Trade and Technician Skills Institute in Brisbane, (from 1 July 2006), specialises in automotive, building and construction, manufacturing and engineering, and electrical/electronic studies for students throughout Queensland. Or the William Angliss Institute of TAFE in Melbourne which specialises in food, hospitality and tourism courses for Victoria.

  1. 4 Australian Capital Territory

In the Australian Capital Territory these include:

 

  1. 5 New South Wales

There are ten TAFE NSW Institutes in NSW which include:

 

  1. 6 Northern Territory

In the Northern Territory these include:

 

  1. 7 Queensland

In QueenslandTAFE Queensland includes:

 

  1. 8 South Australia

In South AustraliaTAFE SA includes:

  1. 9 Tasmania

In Tasmania, there are two government TAFE organisations:

 

  1. 10 Victoria

In Victoria these include:

 

  1. 11 Western Australia

In Western Australia TAFEWA includes:

 

  1. References
    1. a b TAFE gears up to offer degrees By Rebecca Scott, The Age July 24 2002. Accessed August 3 2008
    2. ^ Leesa Wheelahan, Gavin Moodie, Stephen Billett and Ann Kelly, Higher education in TAFE, Research report published by National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), September 3, 2009. Accessed September 24, 2009
    3. ^ Skilled migration coursesQueensland Government December 3 2008. Accessed November 9 2009

 

 

Source: From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

December 7, 2009
December 7, 2009

Williams Business College offers SPECIAL EVENING CLASS OFFER


Williams is a premium business college in North Sydney with 80% local Australian students. Ideal for students with IELTS 5.5 or upper intermediate English who are serious about their studies and are looking for quality courses.

 

Yes, you can enrol

Diploma of Business Administration – 6 months ONLY 3200 AUD

Advanced Diploma of Management – 6 months ONLY 3800 AUD

1 year Business Package ONLY $7000 ( instead of 13,600 AUD)

 

Diploma of Business Administration & Advanced Diploma of Management

Pay in full 6000 AUDfor 1 year package Save additional 1000 AUD! for limited time only.

 

university_ballarat_ic_students

 

Why you should choose – Williams Business College?

  • 80% Australian students, both high school leavers and working professionals, experiencing the Australia way of living and making many Australia friends.
  • Limit to only 20% international from a wide range of countries
  • Offering Advanced Diploma in Marketing or Management, or a double qualification in both in just 12 months
  • Diploma in Business Administration
  • Certificate IV in Business
  • High quality teaching staff
  • IELTS 5.5 or upper intermediate English requirement
  • Beautiful environment, bright open classrooms with balconies overlooking park and open space
  • Conveniently located in North Sydney – bus from Wynyard to the door or 10 minute walk from the train station

Timetable: Monday – Thursday 5pm – 10 pm

Enrolment Fee – ONLY $200 (normally $300, save 100!)

Intake Dates: 18th December, 8th January, 6th February, 6th March Offer Ends: 31st December 2009

December 7, 2009
December 7, 2009
week
Special

 

Study English with TAFE NSW in 2010 for only A$250 per week

 

Special offer for Turkish and South American students – TAFE NSW English Language Centres.

 

This A$250 per week special offer applies to any English language program (except High School Preparation) at TAFE NSW‘s seven English Language Centres in Sydney, Kingscliff, Newcastle, Port Macquarie and Wollongong. This includes the TAFE NSW English for Academic Purposes (EAP) course for direct entry to most Australian universities.

 

TAFE NSW is the largest education and training provider in Australia. You can also choose from over 300 vocational courses at TAFE NSW Institutes in Sydney and across New South Wales.

 

ieaa_study_abroad_in_australia

 

Study and work, learn English and have fun in Australia. Remember to apply before 31 December 2010 to be eligible for this special offer

 

TAFENSW English Language Centre locations in sydney

  • Crows Nest – Northern Sydney Institute
  • Liverpool – South Western Sydney Institute
  • Ultimo – Sydney Institute

TAFENSW English Language Centre locations outside sydney

  • Kingscliff – North Coast Institute
  • Newcastle – Hunter Institute
  • Port Macquarie – North Coast Institute
  • Wollongong – Illawarra Institute
November 30, 2009

The Minister for Immigration and Citizenship, Senator Chris Evans,  announced that the amount of funds international students will need to demonstrate and have genuine access to in order to be granted a Student visa will increase under proposed new changes.

 

Australian Migration Regulations require international students to show evidence of funds to contribute to the cost of living and studying in Australia. This helps to ensure students are better able to make the most of their studies and have a safe and enjoyable experience in Australia.

 

While international students are able to supplement their income with money earned through part-time work in Australia, the ‘living costs’ requirement helps to support the success of students in their studies by ensuring that they do not to rely on such work to meet all their expenses.

 

Legislation changes are being pursued to increase the basic rate of living costs under the Migration Regulations from the previous rate of $12 000 per year. Subject to approval by the Governor-General, it is proposed that these changes will come into effect from 1 January 2010.

 

Under the proposed new regulations, prospective Student visa applicants and their family members must have access to the following funds to meet the living costs requirements:

 

  • $18 000 per year for the main student
  • $6300 per year for the student’s partner
  • $3600 per year for the student’s first child
  • $2700 per year for every other child; and

 

where required demonstrate that the funds they are relying upon to meet the costs of studying in Australia will be genuinely available to them during their stay in Australia.

 

Also under the changes proposed for 1 January 2010, officers of the Department of Immigration and Citizenship (DIAC) assessing Student visa applications will have the discretion to consider a Student visa applicant’s circumstances to determine if the student genuinely holds the funds to which they claim to have access. This includes checking:

 

  • a prospective student’s previous financial and immigration history
  • the employment history of the student or the person providing the student with financial support
  • the source of the income used (for example, cash assets or a bank loan).

 

Where there is doubt about the student’s ability to access their claimed funds in Australia, the prospective student may be requested to provide further information in support of their application. For example, students relying upon a bank loan may need to show that these funds have been deposited into a bank account to which they have unrestricted access, and that they have the financial capacity to service the loan both before they depart for Australia and once they arrive.

November 30, 2009

Australian Job Vacancies begin to recover

The Skilled Vacancy Index (SVI) (trend) increased by 1.9% in October 2009 to 40.2 (2007 = 100).

Vacancies rose for all three occupational groups: Professionals (up by 1.5%), Trades (up by 2.0%), and

Associate Professionals (up by 3.9%). In annual terms, the SVI is 44.0% lower than in October 2008.

 

The Internet Vacancy Index (IVI) (three month moving average) increased in September 2009 (up by

8.3%) to 77.3 (March 2006 = 100). In September 2009, around 206 400 new vacancies were lodged on

the four online recruitment sites (SEEK, MyCareer, CareerOne and Australian JobSearch) on which the

IVI is based. In annual terms, the IVI is 44.2% lower than in September 2008.

 

Vacancies increased for all of the eight occupational groups with the largest increases for Machinery

Operators and Drivers (up by 13.2%), Community and Personal Service Workers (up by 12.5%), and

Labourers (up by 11.9%).

November 12, 2009

International Education Agency – Australia can assist those students affected by the closure of the Meridian International Group of Schools.

 

Affected Meridian International School students have the right to enrol in any school that they wish and their visa will not be affected. However, if they go to a school which does not respect the student  Tuition Assurance Rights then student will be disadvantaged.

 

IEA-A works with Institution that is member of ACPET and have offered the student deduction of the tuition paid to Meridian from their course fee. In addition we provide some schools that  are not charging any fee for submission of RPL.

 

Please be advised that :

•               Students have the right to select the school. It is part of their consumer rights.

•               IEAA will provide them a letter of offer from ACPET registered Institutions with respect to their TAS and consumer rights.

•               We will deduct the Money Paid to Meridian from their tuition.

•               We will not charge them any money for RPL or application of enrolment .

•               Their visa will not be effected if they enrol in a college by themselves.

•               No one has right to tell them NOT TO ENROLL if they want to accept or reject an offer including an ACPET offer. However, if they need to be aware of their TAS right .

 

PLACEMENTs under TAS

•               All students are entitled to a credit free tuition period based on the pre-paid tuition fees they have lost due to the closure of The Meridian colleges

•               The new course must be similarly comparable to the costs and duration listed above, so relocation colleges must be prepared to make amendments where necessary to be able to take students.

•               The displaced students cannot be charged an admission or enrolment fee

•               Students finishing their qualification must be given their Certification/Diploma from the new  college, recognizing their entire studies, not just what they have completed at the new college

•               Students must be given the offer by the new college in writing, which includes costs, payment schedules/schemes and duration of the course

•               RPL cannot be charged for but must be available to each student

 

International Education Agency – Australia offers new school application and transfer services the following courses:

 

• Certificate III in Commercial Cookery

• Certificate III in Patisserie

• Diploma of Hospitality Management

 

International Education Agency – Australia also offers a number of other courses and migration services which you maybe interested in.

 

You can contact us on +61 2 9232 7055 or email us at  [email protected]  for further information regarding our programs.

 

International Education Agency – Australia

 

IEA-A Sydney Office | 428 George Street | Level 9, Suite: 9B

The Dymocks Building Sydney 2000 NSW Australia

T: +61 2 9232 7055 | F: +61 2 9232 7055 [email protected]

 

www.mystudyinaustralia.com   | www.inteducation.com   | www.avustralyadaegitim.com

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