March 25, 2020

As you will be aware, Australia has introduced health and safety measures and travel restrictions to prevent the spread of the novel Coronavirus.

Confirmed cases by local health district (LHD) Across NSW – 25 March 2020

We understand this may be confusing if you’re commencing your studies, so read the below information to find out if you are impacted by the changes, and where you can go for support.

Will I be impacted?

Anyone hoping to travel to and from Australia will be impacted by the recent changes as the Australian Government announced that:

  • A travel ban will be placed on all non-residents and non-Australian citizens coming to Australia, effective from 9pm on Friday, 20 March 2020
  • all Australian and residents will be able to return and are required to self-isolate for 14 days
  • all Australians are advised to not travel overseas at this time. This is the highest advice level (level 4 of 4).

Information about Coronavirus is updated regularly, so it’s important to keep up to date with latest news from Australia.

For the latest information about the Coronavirus in Australia, visit these websites:

International students in Australia

All travellers to Australia from midnight, 15 March 2020 are required to self-isolate for 14 days. Self-isolating means you’re required to stay in your local accommodation. 

You’ll need to avoid going out into public spaces such as restaurants, supermarkets, workplaces, universities and any other public places that you will come into contact with people. Additionally, avoid receiving visitors into your home or local accommodation.

If you need more information on self-isolation, get more details by downloading  the Isolation Guidance information sheet from the Department of Health website. If you need to use public transport (e.g. taxis, ride-hail services, train, buses and trams.), kindly follow the precautions listed in the public transport guide.

If you’re starting your studies during the time you’re required to self-isolate, contact your school or university to discuss your study options. Many universities have put in place measures to assist students who are required to self-isolate, such as delayed semester starts or online study options.

If you, or any friends and family start showing flu-like symptoms such as a cough, fever, sore throat or shortness of breath, it is important to contact your local doctor. You can also monitor your symptoms using the Coronavirus (COVID-19) symptom checker. Call before you visit and explain your symptoms and travel history to ensure they are prepared to receive you.

If you require immediate and urgent medical attention, you can call 000. Any ambulance and hospital fees will be covered by your Overseas Student Health Cover (OSHC).

These measures are put in place to limit the possibility of spreading the Coronavirus to the general population.

How do I get food and other essentials?

Ask others who are not in isolation to get food and other essentials for you. If you are new to the country and don’t know anyone who can help you, you can order your food and groceries online.

Food delivery and ordering apps

Menulog

Deliveroo

Uber Eats

Happy Cow (vegan and vegetarian)

Open table

Groceries

Coles

Woolworths

Will this impact my university start date?

If you’re enrolled in Semester 1 2020 and unable to begin classes due to the travel bans or the 14-day self-isolation, you’ll need to get in touch with your university or school as soon as possible to discuss your enrolment.

Many Australian universities have delayed their semester start dates or have put in place changes to assist international students who have been impacted by the recent travel bans.

We recommend you contact your university or school as soon as possible to discuss your possible study options or deferring your studies to start at a later date. 

You can also check out the following websites for current advice and information that may assist you:

Curtin University

Federation University

Flinders University

Go8 Universities

Griffith University

La Trobe University

Macquarie University

Monash University

Queensland University of Technology

RMIT

Swinburne University

The Australian National University

The University of Adelaide

The University of Queensland

The University of Western Australia

University of Melbourne 

University of South Australia

University of Sydney

University of Technology Sydney

University of Wollongong

UNSW

Victoria University

Western Sydney University

Changes to student accommodation

If you have arranged for student accomodation and can’t travel into the country, then it’s vital you check in with your student accommodation about your next steps.

Some student accommodation providers may require you to provide additional information or may change or delay your accommodation arrangements.

Where can I go for support?

The outbreak of the novel Coronavirus presents an emotionally challenging situation for many international students. The spread of the virus may be causing you or your friends and family distress or anxiety, especially if you have loved ones in affected areas or have not been able to return home or to Australia because of the recent travel bans. 

The Australian Government have created a dedicated and multi-lingual support service for international students. You can contact them via email or phone 1300 981 621 (8:00 am–8:00 pm AEDST Monday to Friday). 

You can also visit the Australian Government Department of Education website to download the latest information, guides and FAQs for up-to-date general health and enrolment advice, where to access support services, and news on the latest immigration and border protection measures.

You can also access the links below:

Support for International Students affected by the Novel Coronavirus

Novel Coronavirus FAQ for International Students

Changes in international flight arrangements

If you have flight arrangements in place, your plans may be affected by travel bans or cancelled flights.

Many major airlines and countries are cancelling flights or restricting entry. If you have overseas travel plans, it’s important to regularly check your airline’s website or contact the airline directly for next steps and travel options at a later date.

Changes to IELTS testing

There are currently changes being made to IELTS testing. Visit the IELTS website to find out if the changes will affect you.

December 28, 2017

Population growth will help propel Australia to become the world’s 11th biggest economy within a decade, a report predicts.
The London-based Centre for Economics and Business Research is forecasting Australia will climb two places on its world economic league table by 2026 from its current ranking of 13.
Countries that depend on brainpower to drive their economies will generally overtake those dependent on natural resources, with China tipped to replace the US as the world’s biggest economy in 2030, the centre says.
While Australia’s economic growth has been fuelled by resources in recent years, the centre also noted that it’s become one of the most popular countries in the world for inward migration.

The London-based Centre for Economics and Business Research is forecasting Australia will climb two places on its world economic league table by 2026 from its current ranking of 13. And it’s particularly Australia’s intake of migrants with highly sought-after skills that will help fuel its future growth.
“Australia is one of the most popular countries in the world for inward migration as well as having natural resources.
“The growing population means that the economy is forecast to rise from 13th largest in 2017 to 11th largest economy in 2026.
“Investment in urban infrastructure will need to accelerate as population increases.”
Australia welcomed 245,400 immigrants in the year ending June 30, 2017, a 27 per cent increase from the year before.
 

“The growing population means the economy is forecast to rise from 13th largest in 2017 to 11th largest economy in 2026,” said the centre’s 2018 World Economic League Table, which ranks the world’s economies by gross domestic product measured in US dollars at market prices to 2030.
Image result for australia 11th biggest economy
 

December 14, 2017


Australia’s international education industry has strengthened across the board, pushing student numbers to new record levels according to the latest data. But doubts have started to emerge over how long the country can maintain its growth streak.
Records continued to fall for Australian international education, but clouds are starting to form, as the country’s reliance on China increases.
The number of international students within Australia currently sits at 9.4% above the 554,200 for the whole of 2016

Year to October data, released by the Department of Education and Training, shows more than 606,700 international students have entered Australia so far in 2017, a 13% increase from the level achieved by the same time in 2016, while enrolments and commencements also experienced double-digit percentage growth.

“The more Australia can do to discover or seek out new markets, the better for the international education sector as a whole”
The surge in numbers has also pushed up total revenue, with the Australian Bureau of Statistics indicating the 12 months to September period grew to a landmark $29.4bn, up from $28.4bn last quarter.
The figure for students, enrolments and commencements as of October has already surpassed that for the whole of 2016.
The number of international students within Australia currently sits 9.4% above the 2016 total of 554,200, while enrolments and commencements – the number of new enrolments in a calendar year – are 7.5% and 2% higher, respectively.
English Australia noted September 2017’s figures were 6.7% down from September 2016
While the figures are welcomed in Australia, not all sectors and source markets experienced consistent improvements, casting doubt over how long the boom will last.
Although 3.3% above the previous year’s October figures, ELICOS stands alone as the only sector to not yet surpass 2016 totals, and after a strong first half of 2017, experienced two consecutive declines in commencements in August and September.
It was the only major sector to do so.
In its latest market analysis report, English Australia noted September 2017’s figures were 6.7% down from September 2016, representing “arguably the first poor month at the national aggregate level for ELICOS in recent years.”
Meanwhile, China further strengthened its position as Australia’s top source market, increasing 18% from the same period in 2016 and pushing its market share across all sectors from 27.5% to approximately 30%; reaching as high as 60% for some sectors.
source:  thepienews.com

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November 22, 2017

According to the Migration Legislation Amendment Regulations 2017 that came into effect on 18th November 2017, an existing condition, 8303 has been amended to expand its scope. Under the new migration rules, many Australian temporary visas will be subject to a condition that will enable the Immigration Department to cancel a person’s visa if they are found to be involved in online vilification based on gender, sexuality, religion, and ethnicity.
Before 18 November 2017, the condition that earlier applied to only a few visas, is now applicable to most temporary visas applied for on.  This condition now also applies to

  • temporary graduate visa (Subclass 485)
  • skilled regional (485),
  • student visa and
  • visitor visa.

The Immigration Minister now has the power to cancel a visa if there is evidence of a visa holder engaging in harassment, stalking, intimidation, bullying or threatening a person even if it doesn’t amount to a criminal sanction. These activities may include public ‘hate speech’ or online vilification targeted at both groups and individuals based on gender, sexuality, religion, and ethnicity.
The Department of Immigration says that the new change: “It sends a clear message, explicitly requiring that the behaviour of temporary visa holders is consistent with Australian government and community expectations.  It advises visa holders what sorts of behaviour can result in visa cancellation.”
The Immigration Department says its officers have the discretion to determine whether the condition has been breached. They also have the discretion to not cancel the visa even when the condition has been breached.
No one should break the law but even behaviour that may not necessarily warrant a criminal sanction can be deemed a breach of this condition. So it is important to remember that your actions online may have consequences just like your real-life actions.

July 14, 2017
Tasmanian state government offer a new visa category that could provide visa-holders a pathway to Australian permanent residency.
Australia is proving to be one of the most popular immigration destinations in the world. With a total annual intake of nearly 200,000, the country evokes the interest of visa-seekers from all over the globe.
Apart from the Skilled Independent visa that allows visa-holders to settle anywhere in Australia, different Australian states and territories have their own immigration programs which are run in accordance with their particular skills and economic requirements, under which the states nominate eligible applicants for skilled migration.
Tasmania, an island state off Australia’s south coast has introduced a new visa category for overseas applicants which will allow them to live and work in the state for four years and also offers a pathway to permanent residency in Australia.

From 1 July this year, a new category for the Skilled Regional (Provisional) visa (Subclass 489) has been introduced for Tasmanian state nomination for overseas applicants. They are eligible to apply for this category as offshore applicants.


Visa subclass 489 allows visa holders to live and work in Tasmania for up to four years.

A state nomination from Tasmania adds 10 points to a skilled visa applicant’s overall score required to qualify for a visa under Australia’s Department of Immigration and Border Protection point test.
After having lived in the state for at least two years and worked full-time (35 hours per week) for at least one year during their stay, visa holders become eligible to apply for permanent residency in Australia.

In order to apply for this visa, an applicant is required to nominate an occupation from Tasmania’s Skilled Occupation List and provide sufficient proof of employment opportunities in the state. Applicants can also secure a genuine offer of employment from employers.
More information send your CV or contact us. 



 

 
 

July 3, 2017

The Short‑term Skilled Occupation List (STSOL) will be applicable for Subclass 190 (Skilled—Nominated visa) or Subclass 489 (Skilled—Regional (Provisional) visa.
The Medium and Long-term Strategic Skills List (MLTSSL) will be applicable for General Skilled migration visas – Subclass 189 (Skilled Independent Visa), Subclass 489 (Skilled Regional Provisional Visa who are not nominated by a State or Territory government agency) and Subclass 485 (Graduate Temporary Visa) visa applications.

July 3, 2017
Previously Australian government had announced from 1st of July 2017, many changes to 457 visa are coming in to effect that it will introduce some reforms to Australia’s temporary employer sponsored skilled migration programmes. The reforms were to include abolishing of Temporary (Skilled) (subclass 457) visa (457 visa) and replacing it with a completely new Temporary Skills Shortage (TSS) visa from March 2018.
The changes from 1st July 2017

  • For existing 457 visas, the STSOL (Short-Term Skilled Occupation List ) will be further reviewed on the bases of advice from the Department of Employment. The MLTSSL (Medium and Long-Term Strategic Skills List) will be revised based on outcomes from Department of Education and training’s 2017-18 SOL review.
  • English language salary exemption threshold, which exempts applicants whose salary is over $96,400 from the English language requirement, will be removed.
  • Policy settings about the training benchmark requirement will be made clearer in legislative instruments.
  •  Provision of penal clearance certificates will become mandatory.
  • For existing 457 visas, before 31st December 2017, the Department of Immigration and Border Protection will start collecting the Tax File Numbers of 457 Visa holders and will match the data with Australian Tax Office’s record to make sure the visa holders are not paid less than their nominated salary.
  • The Department will also commence the publication of details relating to sponsors sanctioned for failing to meet their obligations under the Migration Regulation 1994 and related legislation.

The Changes from March 2018

  • From March 2018, the 457 visa will be abolished and replaced with the TSS visa.
  • The TSS visa will be comprised of a Short-Term stream of up to two years, and a Medium-Term stream of up to four years.
  • The Short-Term stream is designed for Australian businesses to fill skill gaps with foreign workers on a temporary basis, where a suitably skilled Australian worker cannot be sourced.
  • The Medium-Term stream will allow employers to source foreign workers to address shortages in a narrower range of high skill and critical need occupations, where a suitably skilled Australian worker cannot be sourced.


The Short-Term stream will include the following criteria:

  • Genuine entry: A genuine temporary entrant requirement.
  • Renewal: Capacity for visa renewal onshore once only.
  • Occupations:
    • For non-regional Australia, the STSOL will apply.
    • For regional Australia, the STSOL will apply, with additional occupations available to support regional employers.
    • English language requirements: A requirement of an International English Language Testing System (IELTS) (or equivalent test) score of 5, with a minimum of 4.5 in each test component.


The Medium-Term stream will include the following criteria:

  • English language requirements: a requirement of a minimum of IELTS 5 (or equivalent test) in each test component.
  • Renewal: Capacity for visa renewal onshore and a permanent residence pathway after three years.
  • Occupation lists:
    • For non-regional Australia – the MLTSSL will apply.
    • For regional Australia – the MLTSSL will apply, with additional occupations available to support regional employers.

Eligibility criteria for both streams will be:

  • Work experience: at least two years’ work experience relevant to the particular occupation.
  • Labour market testing (LMT): LMT will be mandatory, unless an international obligation applies.
  •  Minimum market salary rate: Employers must pay the Australian market salary rate and meet the Temporary Skilled Migration Income Threshold.
  •  Character: Mandatory penal clearance certificates to be provided.
  •  Workforce: A non-discriminatory workforce test to ensure employers are not actively discriminating against Australian workers.

 Training requirement: Employers nominating a worker for a TSS visa will be required to pay a contribution to the Skilling Australians Fund. The contribution will be:

  • payable in full at the time the worker is nominated;
  • $1,200 per year or part year for small businesses (those with annual turnover of less than $10 million) and $1,800 per year or part year for other businesses.

The detailed policy settings for several of these requirements will be finalised through the implementation process. Further details on these requirements to inform stakeholders will be available in due course.
Who is affected?

  • Current 457 visa applicants and holders, prospective applicants, businesses sponsoring skilled migrants and industry.
  • Existing 457 visas continue to remain in effect.
  • 457 visa applicants that had lodged their application on or before 18 April 2017, and whose application had not yet been decided, with an occupation that has been removed from the STSOL, may be eligible for a refund of their visa application fee.
  • Nominating businesses for these applications may also be eligible for a refund of related fees.

Further information could be find at border.gov.au [contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]

June 29, 2017
In November 2016, reported about Victorian Government’s decision to temporary stop accepting applications for skilled visa for certain ICT occupations.
The Temporary Graduate (subclass 485) visa

Skilled visa applications for 11 occupations were temporarily closed by the Victorian Government for certain ICT occupations from 11 November 2016 till 6 March 2017 which was later revised and extended till 30 June 2017.
The state government has announced that from 1 July 2017, the Victorian Skilled and Business Migration Program will reopen applications for ICT occupations.

New application process for ICT occupations

Due to the high number of ICT applications that Victoria receives, the state government is changing the application process for ICT occupations. The aim of this is to reduce processing times and improve experience.
Those interested in applying for Victorian nomination (in ICT occupations), are advised to follow these steps:
1. Send your resume to sydney@inteducation.com
we will check you meet the Department of Immigration and Border Protection’s (DIBP) Skilled Nominated visa (subclass 190) requirements and Victoria’s minimum nomination requirements.
Then we will submit an Expression of Interest (EOI) for the Skilled Nominated visa (subclass 190)  in DIBP’s SkillSelect, and indicate your interest for Victorian nomination. You do not need to notify Victoria that you have submitted an EOI.
There is no set timeframe to expect an invitation after submitting an EOI. Invitations are not guaranteed. If selected, an email invitation to apply for Victorian visa nomination will be sent to your email address used for the EOI.
If you receive the invitation. we will submit an online application for Victorian visa nomination within 14 days of receiving the invitation. Note that you must be able to demonstrate that you still meet the claims that were in your EOI when you were invited. It is recommend that you have all your supporting documents ready before you submit your EOI in SkillSelect, as the 14 days cannot be extended.
If you are successfully nominated by the Victorian Government, you will receive a SkillSelect invitation to apply for the Skilled Nominated visa (subclass 190) .
Then we will submit a visa application to DIBP within 60 days of being nominated by Victoria.
Selection considerations
The Victorian Government will review and select the top ranking ICT candidates from SkillSelect, who have indicated Victoria as their preferred state.
Candidates who are selected to apply are still required to meet Victoria’s minimum eligibility requirements, including demonstrating employability and commitment to Victoria, and are not guaranteed nomination.
If you are not selected by the Victorian Government, you will not receive an email. Your EOI will continue to be considered for as long as it remains in DIBP’s SkillSelect system.
Current  Occupations eligible to apply for Victorian visa nomination

Victoria SOL

Victoria SOL

Victoria SOL
Victoria SOL
Victoria SOL
Victoria SOL
Victoria SOL
Victoria SOL
Victoria SOL
Victoria SOL

For more details, visit Victorian Government’s website. [contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]

June 9, 2017
 Five Australian university are among the world’s top 50 universities and 7 are in the top 100, according to a major global ranking that shows Australian universities have made overall improvements in all measures, including teaching, employability and research.
Australian National University is the highest ranked in the country at 20th place in the 2018 QS World University Rankings.
It is followed by the University of Melbourne, ranked at 41, the University of New South Wales at 45, the University of Queensland at 47 and the University of Sydney at 50.
Monash University, with a rank of 60, and the University of Western Australia at 93 round out the seven Australian universities in the top 100.

An institution’s rank is determined by its academic and employer reputations, student-to-faculty ratio, citations per faculty, and international faculty and student ratios.
A total of 37 Australian Government universities are included in this year’s ranking, which covers 959 universities around the world and measures performance in research, teaching, employability and internationalisation.

Belinda Robinson, chief executive of peak sector body Universities Australia, said the ranking is especially important to international students choosing a university.
“Global rankings are a major factor for many international students in deciding where to study, so they’re also very important to the $22.4 billion a year that international students bring into Australia’s economy,” Ms Robinson said.

“These impressive rises underscore the global competitiveness of Australia’s universities and the excellent quality of our education and research on the world stage.”

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is the top ranked university in the world for the sixth consecutive year, followed by Stanford University, Harvard University, the California Institute of Technology, the University of Cambridge, the University of Oxford, University College London, Imperial College London, the University of Chicago and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology.

MIT has been described as “the nucleus of an unrivalled innovation ecosystem” by QS Quacquarelli Symonds, the education analysis firm behind the ranking, which notes that companies created by the university’s alumni have a combined revenue of $2 trillion, the equivalent of the world’s 11th largest economy.
Research director at QS Quacquarelli Symonds, Ben Sowter, said the improved ranking of Australian universities can be partially attributed to the changing political climate in countries such as the US and UK increasing Australia’s comparative popularity.

“Higher internationalisation scores certainly reflect coherent international outreach efforts made by university marketing departments,” Mr Sowter said. “However, they also reflect the increased desirability of Australian higher education in the light of current political situations in the United States and United Kingdom – typically Australia’s main Anglosphere competitors.
“Improvements in scores for Academic Reputation can be attributed to both the type of teaching innovations … and the standard of research emanating from Australia’s universities.”

 
 
Source: smh.com.au

January 2, 2017

Usually Education agents assist international students to secure a place in an Australian school. While institutions can enrol students directly, they also work with the global student agent network such as IEA-A International Network. You may choose to use a qualified education agent, usually known as a student counsellor, academic adviser, or student recruiter in your home country, or one based in Australia, to guide you through the process of choosing a school and enrolling.
Also based on your home country, your education agent with deep knowledge of Australian visa system, will manage your student visa application that could be critical for getting your student visa successfully. IEA-A has Australian office and in your local country so our services start in your country and continue in Australia.
Why you need a Qualified Education Agent Counsellor ? 
Education agents help reduce the stress of choosing a school in another country. Understanding your options, with someone who speaks your language, can be very reassuring. It is important through that that your agent is knowledgeable, up-to-date on student visa and curriculum changes, and has your best interest at heart. We hear stories of students who arrive for their first day of class to find out that the school has never heard of them. The education agent industry can attract unethical people, so do your research to make sure you are working with a good agent!
In this section, we provide guidance on using agents. Our qualified principal Migration Agent and education councillor Mrs. Feriha Guney (Qualified Education Agent Counsellors QEAC number: C102). (Migration Agent – MARN:0960690) is one of the industry expert with over 15 years of experience and thousands of satisfied international student, can assist you herself or with a number of education counsellors or migration Agents/Lawyer work with her. 
Some of the benefits of using a qualified education agent 
If you agent is not qualified or experienced could cost you not only your visa fee or time but also he/she can damage your education career and even may change your life. On the other hand a qualified and experienced education agent, coudl help you to build your education career and even after a successful life, by doing:

  • conduct an interview to understand your needs and goals
  • make suggestions for the best institutions and programs to help you reach your goals
  • assist you to collect all of the documents you will need for your application
  • guide you through the application process
  • review your statement of purpose and provide information on interview process
  • guide you through the visa process once you have been accepted by an institution
  • help you prepare for the move and your arrival in Australia
  • organisation of airport pick-up and accommodation
  • provide information on how to find job in Australia and regulations
  • provide information on how to get Australian Tax number if you want to work
  • provide information on how to open bank account
  • provide information on how to get Australian Mobile Phone services
  • provide information on how to extend / change your visa while you are studying (may require additional fee)
  • provide information on how on Graduate work visa after your graduation of apply   (may require additional fee)
  • provide information on how to apply a permanent skill visa

Education agents fees
When working with an agent, is very important to understand how the agent makes money. You will find that most experienced and qualified education agents offer their services for understanding your education career, checking your “statement of purpose” as well as preparation for the interview, finding right school for your education purpose, helping you to have school acceptance, counselling and the enrolment process fee which it depends of the country of application (as requirements for each country is different). 
Although some inexperienced agent may offer their services free of charge, you should question their qualification and experiences that may cost your education career or even change your life forever. In addition to that you may or may not be charged for any school application fees that arise such as the school assessment (the schools charge the agent for this service). You will also be charged for the visa application fee which is paid to the government of Australia.
If you are applying in Australia, IEA-A usually will not charge you a fee. However if you are applying from overseas and if your home country considered in a risky country, there yoru application need to be prepared professionally and reviewed by expert before making application, so we may charge you an application fee.
Best Agent location – in your home country or in Australia or in both?
Should you use an agent in your country, or one based in Australia? There are benefits and drawbacks to each options.
IEA-A usually offer both location support, in your home country for visa application and assessing your application according to your home country requirements, in Australia for on-going help and support. This way you have benefit of Using an education agent based in your country,  you are dealing with somebody who is local and understand your education system.
Education Counsellor in your home country should also be very knowledgeable about visas for nationals of your country. The interview process can take place over the phone or face to face in your native language, and all the paperwork and applications can be processed locally.  
When an education agent located in Australia, you have representation when you arrive, and can expect very good relationships with, and knowledge about, Australian education providers. Your agent can assist with airport pickup, accommodation, and in some cases even help you to understand how you can get a job while you are studying.
How do I know if an agent is knowledgeable?
The migration agent system is regulated by the Australian government. Registered migration agents can counsel on migration visas, student visas, or both. If you are working with a migration agent who is also a student agent, we suggest you use one who is registered with the Office of the MARA to ensure they are up-to-date on visa rules. In addition, you can also find out whether a night and overseas agent has been banned from working in migration.
Although it is not mandatory, the Qualified Education Agent Counsellors qualification managed by  the PIER Education Agent Training, ensures an agent understands student visas and regulation, especially if you are working with an education agent in your country. The qualification is not mandatory currently, but it can be a good indication of the quality of the agent. See if your agent has right qualification.  
All IEAA Education counsellors and migration Agents have required qualifications and lead by our principal Director Ms. Feriha Guney who has both qualification as Registered Migration Agent and Education Agent  (Mrs. Feriha Guney (Qualified Education Agent Counsellors QEAC number: C102). (Migration Agent – MARN:0960690 ) and over 15 years of experience on both fields.  
If you want to check your eligibility as a student visa o study ion Australia, send your resume and write to us on sydney@inteducation.com.

December 3, 2016
December 3, 2016

australian_universities_map_may_2014
Australia is home to 43 universities with at least one university main campus based in each state or territory.
The Australian Universities map allows you to see where each university’s main campus is located. Most universities have more than one campus and are located across multiple states and territories, providing you with a choice of where in Australia you would like to study.

List of Australian Universities

Australian Capital Territory

New South Wales

Northern Territory

Queensland

South Australia

Tasmania

Victoria

Western Australia

source: www.studyinaustralia.gov.au

December 2, 2016

studyinaustralia_students_large

International education experts believe the country may benefit even more from political and economic changes in Britain and the United States.
International education’s value to Australia has surged past 20 billion Australian dollars ($14.8 billion U.S.), confirming the industry’s status as the country’s third-biggest earner and easily the largest export of services.
New figures from the Australian Bureau of Statistics show that international education has shrugged off a cocktail of problems — including a high Australian dollar, officious visa administration and attacks against foreign students — to post a new revenue record.
Experts say the resurgence could accelerate, if Brexit and Donald Trump’s successful presidential campaign stem student flows to Australia’s two biggest competitors. Figures released last week showed that the growth in the number of Chinese students enrolling at U.S. institutions last year was the lowest in a decade.

Australia’s international education exports totaled 20.3 billion Australian dollars ($15 billion) last financial year, an 8 percent rise compared with 2014-15.
The figure includes fees and onshore spending on goods and services such as food and accommodation, as well as royalties, consultancies and other related services.
Most of the income came from foreigners studying at universities, with the higher education sector attracting about 14 billion Australian dollars ($10.4 billion).
Vocational training institutions earned about 3 billion Australian, English language colleges 1 billion and schools 800 million ($2.2 billion, $740 million and $592 million, respectively).

Universities Australia, which represents institutions, said international education helped sustain Australian living standards, supporting more than 130,700 jobs.
It said more than 320,000 students from 130 countries were currently studying in Australia’s universities.
“Through the exchange of students on a grand scale, we’re forging relationships that underpin our future diplomacy, trade, business links, cultural insight and personal connections,” said Universities Australia’s chief executive, Belinda Robinson.
Meanwhile, newly released government data reveal that Australia’s most prestigious universities are continuing to increase dramatically the number of international students they enroll, largely to help cover the costs of research.
While the national average was just shy of 20 percent international student enrollments, last year Melbourne University enrolled 18,384 overseas students — or 31.2 percent of its total enrollment, up from 16,140 the previous year.
Melbourne was followed by the Australian National University, with 28 percent international students.
The University of Sydney, University of New South Wales, Monash University, University of Technology Sydney and RMIT University all had more than one in four students from overseas.
Previous research has demonstrated that international students not only subsidize the teaching of domestic students but also keep afloat the multimillion-dollar research efforts of major universities.
However, Melbourne’s overseas student enrollments pale in comparison with Federation University in Ballarat, where 42.5 percent of students come from overseas, and Gold Coast-based Bond University, with 41.3 percent.
Local undergraduate students contribute 10,440 Australian dollars ($7,729) a year to study business. For international students, fees to study for a business degree next year range from 19,920 Australian dollars ($14,746) at the University of New England to 39,264 Australian dollars ($29,065) at research-intensive Melbourne University.
Phil Honeywood, chief executive of the International Education Association of Australia, warned that any increase in students deciding against the U.S. or Britain could be tempered by increased competition from Canada, China and New Zealand.

Source: www.insidehighered.com

November 7, 2016

14702452_1138916749520787_8297787580473740138_nAustralia’s Department of Immigration and Border Protection (DIBP) has released the new Skilled Occupations List (SOL) for 2016-17. The purpose of the country’s skilled migration programme is to attract “highly employable” people for migration, and it is the most common form of migration to Australia.

Australia is one of the biggest gainers through emigration, which is largely accomplished through its “skilled migration programme” which gives preference to skilled foreigners looking to make the country its new home.
The purpose of the country’s skilled migration programme is to attract “highly employable” people for migration, and it is the most common form of migration to Australia.
According to the Department of Immigration and Border Protection (DIBP) new guidelines, these are some of the skills that will give you preference for emigration to Australia.
There are over 185 jobs listed – below is a general overview of the types of skills.

  • Chefs (excluding fast food or takeaway food services)
  • Plumbers
  • Gasfitters
  • Panel beaters
  • Carpenters
  • Fitters and turners
  • Welders
  • Engineers (Chemical, Electrical, Aeronautical, Agricultural and many others)
  • Telecoms (Network planners, Radio technicians, Engineers)
  • Systems Analysts
  • Programmers/Developers
  • Computer Network and Systems Engineers
  • Psychologists
  • Doctors, Surgeons and medical specialists
  • Registered Nurses and Midwives
  • Veterinarians
  • Actuaries, Auditors, Accountants

The Skilled Occupations List (SKO) is used for Skilled Independent Visa, Skilled Regional Provisional Visa and Graduate Temporary Visa applications.
In the same report, the DIBP has also released the Consolidated Sponsored Occupations List (CSO) which is used for Skilled Nominated Visa, Temporary Work Skilled Visa and Employer Nominated Scheme visa applications.
The CSO lists skills that companies in Australia are looking for, and employers or the state will sponsor for emigration into the country.
The full list for both classes can be found here: Australia SKO and CSOLists

July 25, 2016

 
I have a confession to make … I just hired an engineer from London for my company. While I have been a vocal proponent for remaining headquartered in Australia and keeping our engineering base local, this is no longer a tenable strategy. There simply isn’t enough tech talent to satisfy the demands of both corporate Australia and the growing technology start-up ecosystem. It’s all well and good that we keep talking about how great the future will be for technology companies in Australia, but that future won’t eventuate if we drop the ball in the here and now.
Jonathan Barouch, founder of Local Measure, says the fact that the immigration department takes up to eight weeks to process a 457 application for a software engineer is a joke.
The policies in the Innovation Statement to address the talent gap and improve gender diversity are sound.
However, by the government’s own admission, many of its policies will take at least a decade to bear any fruit. So what can we do in the meantime to satisfy the demand for talented technical staff in Australian technology companies?

There isn’t enough tech talent to satisfy both corporate Australia and the growing start-up ecosystem.

Draw talent to Australia
We have around 300,000 foreign students in our tertiary institutions, many from China and India who come to Australia to study degrees like software engineering and maths. We need to do a better job at selling Australia to these students as a permanent home. A Sydney University lecturer recently told me that historically Chinese students would come to study in Australia and then use that as a path to migrate. Anecdotally, she’s finding that many of the business and engineering students are now more excited by the prospect of being an entrepreneur back in China than by the idea of remaining in Australia.
If that is the case, we need to shift these students’ perceptions by showcasing the exciting companies and opportunities that exist locally. There has been a lot of debate about the merit of the government’s $28 million taxpayer-funded Innovation Statement marketing. Some of this money might be better spent outside Australia promoting our country as a destination to the world’s top tech talent and companies. We might have had a bigger bang for our buck by simply renting billboards on the 101 between San Francisco and Silicon Valley publicising jobs Down Under.
Make 457 visas simpler
Given all the talk about simplifying our 457 regime to help start-ups access critical talent, it’s surprising that we’ve yet to see any action. The fact that the immigration department takes up to eight weeks to process a 457 application for a software engineer is a joke. Technology companies in every other country are fighting for the same talent and we are missing out on the best and brightest because of government process.
I recently tried to move an engineer to Australia on a 457 visa. The process was time-consuming and expensive and took the full eight weeks to get approved. In stark contrast, we had an Australian employee organising an E3 visa to work in our US office at the same time. The process was able to be done online and his visa was approved on the spot at the US consulate. This seems like a perfect problem for the government’s Digital Transformation Office to tackle.
Send talent overseas
While it may sound counter-intuitive, we need to support some of our smartest to go overseas to gain valuable experience that can then be brought back home. In my company, Local Measure, we have team members who’ve had experience working in large technology companies in Silicon Valley, China and Europe as they scale. The amount of knowledge and proficiency they transfer to their colleagues significantly de-risks our business as we expand overseas.
Let’s create a program where there is an incentive in the first few years of returning to Australia after having worked in a qualifying technology company overseas. This might have the added benefit of attracting back some of Silicon Valley’s so-called “Aussie mafia”.
It is a very encouraging sign for the health of our ecosystem that so many people in the wider community are now talking about start-ups and innovation. In all of the excitement to lay the proper foundations for future growth let’s not forget about the issues facing our companies in the here and now.
source: www.afr.com

June 8, 2016

downloadNew rules affecting foreign student visas, which go into effect from 1 July 2016, will be a boon for the property market, especially in Sydney and Melbourne.
The Simplified Student Visa Framework (SSVF) aims to “support the sustainable growth of Australia’s international education sector” by reducing red tape. Key changes under the SSVF include reducing the number of student visa subclasses from eight to two and introducing a simplified single immigration risk framework for all international students.
The head of Australia for Chinese property portal, Juwai.com, Gavin Norris, said the new framework is positive for the Australian housing market.
“Six out of every 10 Chinese property buying inquiries made in Australia last year were related to education,” Norris said.
“Juwai.com sent about AU$1.6 billion of property buying inquiries to Australian vendors last year, and almost $1 billion of that value came from families who wanted to buy homes for their children to live in while studying here.
“Anything Australia does to increase the number of Chinese students will also increase investment in strategic areas of the real estate market that generates more construction jobs, more new housing being built and more economic growth.”
Last year, Chinese students made up 1 out of every four international students in Australia, and international students support about 130,000 jobs, according to research from Juwai. Norris said these statistics demonstrate the invaluable contribution foreign students have on the Australian economy.

“When Australia wins a foreign student, it gains tens of thousands in education fees, additional tens of thousands in retail and services spending, hundreds of thousands in a potential real estate investment and – most important of all – the possibility that highly educated individual will decide to stay and work here and contribute to our economy over the long term,” he said.

“Every student who might have come here, but doesn’t, could represent substantial lost benefits.
“The reverse is also true. Anything that discourages international property investment also risks causing adverse impacts the education industry.”
Norris has also praised other SSVF changes, which include trialling visa applications in Mandarin and trialling 10-year student visas.
“These visa changes are smart, and help Australia catch up to nations like the US, which offer similar visa terms.
“The most important elements are the Mandarin language applications, the 10 year validity pilot and the simplified paperwork.
“For the most part, these changes are about avoiding the loss of our privileged place as a destination of choice for overseas students, rather than beating the competition,” Norris said.
 
source: www.brokernews.com.au

June 2, 2016

passportSkilled migrants made up about 68% of the 190,000 places in Australia’s 2014-15 migration programme, which is separate from the humanitarian programme.

The migration programme controls the variety and number of workers moving to the country, and according to the Department of Immigration is “specifically designed to target migrants who have skills or outstanding abilities that will contribute to the Australian economy” and to fill labour shortages.
Over the past 15 years or so, Australia’s non-humanitarian migration policy has evolved from its original “populate or perish” focus to one seeking people who will make a specific contribution to the economy. A background note by the Australian parliamentary library notes a change in policy in the late 1990s resulted in a shift in the balance of permanent migrants from a majority coming through the family stream – that is, reuniting family members – to majority skilled migrants.
To qualify for a range of Australian skilled visas, people must satisfy a points-based assessment. Points are awarded in a number of categories.

Age requirements

Applicants must be under 50. Any applicants aged between 25 and 32 automatically start with half of the required 60 points. Those aged between 45 and 49 start with zero.

Competency in English

All applicants must demonstrate a basic competence in English. But they are only awarded points if their language skills are deemed “proficient” or “superior”.

Qualifications and experience

The remaining points to achieve the minimum 60 are awarded for certain qualifications and employment histories – gained in Australia or overseas – or other factors including tertiary education and whether an applicant’s partner fulfils certain requirements. A doctorate from an institution recognised by Australia is worth 20 points, for example.
Prospective residents can also gain points if they have previously worked in Australia, or if they have studied in certain specified parts of the country, such as metropolitan areas with low population growth.

Occupation

For some visa subclasses, sponsorship by an employer or family member or nomination by a government is required.
If an applicant is not sponsored by an employer, their occupation must be on an approved list. For each occupation, there is is a limit on the number of applications that can be accepted. For the 2015-16 intake, Australia has already approved all 1,000 available visas for auditors, company secretaries and corporate treasurers; the 1,788 industrial, mechanical and production engineers; and 1,000 other engineering professionals.
But if you are a (non-primary) school teacher, a vet or a cartographer, there are still thousands of places left.

Source: theguardian.com

May 19, 2016

Department of Immigration and Border Protection (DIBP) have released the new Skilled Occupations List (SOL) for 2016-17. This list will come into effect from 1st July, 2016.

The Skilled Occupations List is used for

  • 189 (Skilled Independent Visa),
  • 489 (Skilled Regional Provisional Visa) and
  • 485 (Graduate Temporary Visa) visa applications.

The DIBP have also released the Consolidated Sponsored Occupations List (CSOL) which is used for 190 (Skilled Nominated Visa), 457 (Temporary Work Skilled Visa) and 186 (Employer Nominated Scheme) visa applications.
Here’s the new SOL 2016-17
sol-page-001

 

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sol-page-003

sol-page-004

sol-page-005

sol-page-006

 

 
ContAct us on migration@inteducation.com for further information.

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May 4, 2016

Australian Education 2025The Australian Education Roadmap developed by Austrade clearly articulates an ambition to develop, enhance and grow the onshore sector to welcome up to 720,000 students; compound annual growth of 3.8% on the nearly 500,000 Australia welcomes today.
“In a high market-share scenario, these numbers could almost double to nearly 990,000 by 2025,” states the report. “Beyond this, in the relatively untapped borderless skills market of in-market, online and blended delivery – there are projected to be in excess of one billion students around the world.”

“In a high market-share scenario, these numbers could almost double to nearly 990,000 by 2025,”

The three areas of focus for the strategy are: Strengthening the Fundamentals of Australia’s education system (via delivering the best student experience possible, providing robust quality assurance); Making Transformative Partnerships (via alumni building, strengthening partnerships) and Competing Globally (via promoting excellence).
International Education is 3rd biggest export earner
Richard Colbeck, minister for tourism and international education, signed off on a considered and cohesive strategy which represents clear ambition.
In Richard Colbeck, minister for tourism and international education, Foreword, he commented, “It is critical that we embrace the role as a driver of change. We must be conscious of what our competitors are doing, particularly what they are doing better than us.”
Stakeholders welcomed the announcement. Phil Honeywood, CEO of the International Education Association of Australia, said, “Given that international education is now worth $19.6 bn a year to the Australian economy, it now requires the level of attention that the nation’s third largest export sector should attract.”

“Given that international education is now worth $19.6 bn a year to the Australian economy, it now requires the level of attention that the nation’s third largest export sector should attract.”

Honeywood is a member of the Coordinating Council for International Education which consulted with government on its draft strategy. The council commended the first “whole-of-sector” strategy and said effective implementation was now needed.
“The sector provides far more than just an economic boost,” underlined Honeywood. “Research collaboration, two-way student mobility and student services such as accommodation and employment skills are all vital and require greater national coordinated effort. These ‘soft diplomacy’ benefits are often overlooked.”
Minister Colbeck also announced the formation of an ongoing council that will be responsible for implementation.
It was the country’s foreign minster, Julie Bishop, who announced the strategy while in Tasmania and it is the department for foreign affairs and trade which is championing the alumni agenda. To support this concurrent strategy, a website and Linked In group has been launched.
Twelve “inspirational” alumni ambassadors have been selected to work to build Australia’s profile in their home countries, and a video profile series is available, Australian by Degree.
“Over 50 years, 2.5 million international students have been attracted to Australia and its world class educational institutions,” said Bishop.
source: thepienews.com

May 4, 2016

migration-to-australia
Migration to Australia 2014 – 2015

The Australian government has announced that the migration programs for 2017 will remain for the fifth year in a row at its highest level – 190,000 permanent residency places.
Migration numbers according to categories will be

  • 128,550 for skilled migration (including General Skilled Migration, permanent Employer Sponsorship and Business Skills) and
  • 57,400 places for family migration.

The remaining places will include

  • 565 under the Special Eligibility stream and
  • 3,485 for Child category migrants.

This break down of the available permanent residency places remains exactly the same as the 2015-16 program year that is now nearing conclusion.
The official media release from the Minister for Immigration and Border Protection with these 2016-17 Migration Program figures can be found here
 

November 27, 2015

int-student-sydneyStudents are able to work while studying and can earn a bachelor’s degree in three years.
Australia sits at a cultural crossroads, with historical links to the West and economic ties to the East. This may, in part, explain the country’s appeal to international students.
“You’re getting the best of both worlds,” says Vik Naidoo, head of international student recruitment at the University of Sydney.
There were more than 269,700 international higher education students in Australia in 2014, according to the Institute of International Education’s Project Atlas. That means roughly one out of every five students at the country’s universities was international.
While Australian universities have similarities to those in other English-speaking nations, such as the U.K., there are differences too. Here are three facts prospective students should know about the international undergraduate experience in Australia.

  1. HIGH GOVERNMENTAL REGULATIONS on INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION SECTOR

There are laws on the books to protect international students. Australian legislation requires universities to provide international students with orientation programs, access to support services and contact information for university officials who can assist them, among other things.
“We don’t just recruit them and say, ‘Now off you go, you’re by yourself,'” says Naidoo. “We, by legislative arrangement, we have a duty of care to those students.”
Nina Khairina, a third-year international student at Monash University in Victoria who hails from Indonesia, said by email that she has faced challenges such as loneliness and having to adjust to a new style of teaching.
Khairina, who is national president of the Council of International Students Australia, an advocacy organization for foreign students, said the most helpful source of support has been the Monash University International Students Service, run by student volunteers “who work passionately to improve the experience of other international students.” She added that a student rights officer and counselors are available on campus as well.
Universities are also legally required to post on their websites lists of education agents appointed to represent the institutions abroad. Applicants who do not use agents can submit their materials directly to Australian universities online; there isn’t a common application system for international students.

  1. SOME DEGREE PROGRAMS CAN BE COMPLETED IN THREE YEARS

Students can earn a degree in three years, but might want to study longer. Most bachelor’s programs in Australia are three years long. However, high-achieving students at Aussie universities can go on to earn a bachelor honors degree – a more advanced credential – by studying for an additional year.
Honors programs are selective. At the University of Sydney, for example, less than 5 percent of all undergraduates are enrolled in the honors program, according to Naidoo. The higher-level program “is teaching you a lot of research skills,” says Naidoo, “which you don’t necessarily get in the traditional undergraduate degree.”
Earning an honors degree is the typical pathway to a doctoral degree program, according to the Australian government’s Department of Education and Training.
Keit Loi, a native of Malaysia who recently earned an honors Bachelor of Biomedicine at the University of Melbourne, says the “intense” honors year is a good trial run for students who think they might want to conduct research at a higher academic level.
“If you still survive it and you still enjoy research after that,” he says, “you know you’re capable of doing a Ph.D.” Loi has applied to a Ph.D. program at the University of Melbourne.
Some universities also offer four-year – or longer – programs with a built-in research component as another path to a bachelor honors degree.

  1. WORK WHILE STUDYING

International students may work while studying. Undergraduate tuition at Australian institutions can vary from $10,800 to $23,800 or more per year, according to the Australian government. Students can work part time to help pay for school.
Most student visa holders can work up to 40 hours every two weeks while taking classes, according to the government’s Department of Immigration and Border Protection. International students can apply for jobs on and off campus, and during academic breaks there isn’t a limit on the number of hours they can work.
But finding employment can be challenging in some locations according to U.S. national Carolyn Reimann, a third-year undergraduate medical student at James Cook University in Queensland.  She added that it might be easier for students to find jobs in cities like Sydney and Melbourne that are popular tourist destinations.
If international students want to work in Australia after graduation, they can apply for a temporary graduate visa. This credential allows non-citizens to work in the country for a period of 18 months to up to four years, depending on their set of skills and degree level.
But studying in Australia isn’t just about hard work and classes, some students say.
“There is a strong emphasis on having a study-work-life balance here,” Khairina said by email. “I was not used to that at the beginning and focused too much on getting perfect grades; it’s not like that anymore and I enjoy it.”
source: www.usnews.com

November 23, 2015

downloadExports from Australia’s international education services sector – two-thirds of it comprising income from international higher education students – reached a record high of $18.8 billion in 2014-15, the latest Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) data has shown.
According to the Minister for Tourism and International Education, Senator Richard Colbeck, the figures eclipsed the previous peaks of $17.6 billion in calendar year 2014 and $16.3 billion in financial year 2013-14.
He said: “Education services exports for 2014-15 increased by 15% on the 2013-14 figure, which shows our booming international education sector continues to go from strength to strength.”
The figures confirmed that international education remains Australia’s largest services export and its third-largest export overall after iron ore and coal, he said.
“International education is also a major generator of jobs, with the sector supporting over 130,000 jobs in cities and regions throughout Australia,” he said. “The government is determined to ensure the international education sector continues to be one of the major strengths of the Australian economy.”

The vast majority of the income, $18.2 billion, was contributed by the nearly half a million students who chose to study in Australia over this period. International students in the higher education sector generated $12.5 billion in export income, while students in the vocational education and training sector produced $2.9 billion.

Read More

May 26, 2015

passportNew applications for the Significant Investor Visa (SIV) have been suspended since 24 April 2015, for the purpose of preparing new framework for the SIV in anticipation of its reintroduction on 1 July 2015.
Last Friday (15 May 2015), Andrew Robb, Minister for Trade and Investment, and Michaela Cash, Assistant Minister for Immigration and Border Protection, made a joint announcement of the Australian Government’s much anticipated new investment framework for the Significant Investor Visa (SIV). The announcement also provided some further information regarding the introduction of the new Premium Investor Visa (PIV).
The new arrangements are part of the Australian Government’s Industry Innovation and Competitiveness Agenda to facilitate the flow of capital into innovative start-ups and emerging Australian companies.
The agenda is to be achieved by stopping SIV applicants from investing the required $5 million into passive investments, such as government bonds.
The new framework for the SIV will require at least a $5 million investment, which must comprise:

  • At least $500,000 into eligible Australian venture capital or growth private equity fund(s) (VCPE) investing in start-ups and small private companies;
  • At least $1.5 million into eligible managed fund(s) or Listed Investment Companies (LICs) that predominately invest in emerging companies (i.e. market capitalisation below $500 million) listed on the Australian Securities Exchange (ASX) listed;
  • A ‘balancing investment’ (the amount will depend on how much was invested in the above mandatory elements) in managed funds or LICs investing in a combination of other eligible investments, including other ASX-listed companies (i.e. companies with market capitalisations above $500 million), corporate bonds or notes, annuities and (with limitations) residential real estate.

The new framework also prohibits ‘loan back’ arrangements. Accordingly, new visa applicants will no longer be allowed to use their investments as collateral for borrowings.

What are the Significant and Premium Investor visas?
The Significant Investor visa is a stream within the Business Innovation and Investment (Provisional) (Subclass 188) visa and the Business Innovation and Investment (Permanent) (Subclass 888) visa.
The purpose of the visa is to provide a boost to the Australian economy and to compete effectively for high net worth individuals seeking investment migration. Significant Investor Visa (SIV) holders are required to invest AUD5million into complying investments for a minimum of four years before being eligible to apply for a permanent visa.
The government intends that the Premium Investor visa (PIV) will be created as a new stream within the Business Innovation and Investment (Provisional) (Subclass 188) visa and the Business Innovation and Investment (Permanent) (Subclass 888) visa on 1 July 2015.
The purpose of the Premium Investor visa is to attract high net worth individuals to contribute their entrepreneurial skill or talent to Australia. The Premium Investor visa will be require applicants to invest AUD15million into complying investments for a minimum of twelve months before being eligible to apply for a permanent visa.

The announcement confirmed that the PIV will provide a fast-tracked, 12-month pathway to Australian permanent residency for talented entrepreneurs and innovators who can invest at least $15 million into eligible investments. The PIV will also allow a wider range of eligible investments than the SIV, including direct investments in a range of companies and financial products.
The new framework for the SIV and the PIV will come into effect on 1 July 2015.
 
Authors: Paul Hardman, Phoebe Yin, Christopher Rowe
Source: holdingredlich.com
 
 
Note: [1] The Australian Government intends to increase this amount to $1 million within the next two years, subject to the initial response to the scheme.

May 14, 2015

passportAccording to  Minister for Immigration and Border Protection, Peter Dutton, Australia is set to further streamline and the visa system simplified under measures contained in the Budget.
Reduced red tape and several initiatives will benefit Australian consumers, international travellers, the travel industry, exporters, importers and visa applicants.
The Seamless Traveller initiative will see the roll out of new technology, including SmartGates, at air and sea ports, the Trusted Trader Programme (TTP) will expedite cargo clearances and the Budget will enable significant changes to Australia’s skilled and temporary migration legislation.
Seamless Traveller will see $93.7 million spent over the next five years for rollout of next generation automated biometric processing at major air and sea ports.
Biometric capability will reduce manual processes allowing a fast, seamless self-processing experience for up to 90 per cent of travellers and enable border control officers to concentrate on passengers-of-interest.
“Through the use of cutting-edge technology, such as SmartGates, we are providing benefits to travellers and industry while meeting national security challenges head on,” Minister for Immigration and Border Protection, Peter Dutton said.
A total of $5.6 million has been allocated to start a pilot phase of a Trusted Trader Programme.
The pilot will start with four industry partners focusing on seaborne container exports and rapidly expand over the year to imports and air cargo involving around 40 Australian exporters and importers and their supply chains.
Faster clearance of low risk cargo for traders with a history of high trade compliance and commitment to supply chain security will again enable border officers to focus on high risk consignments.
“Increased efficiency in cargo movement will make Australia more competitive in the global marketplace and benefit the economy, Mr Dutton said.
Changes to Australia’s skilled and temporary migration legislation will see 25 visa subclasses consolidated into a simplified framework providing an easier process for visa applicants.
Mr Dutton said these changes were smart policy that would improve system integrity and border security and deliver a more efficient service.
“The measures in the 2015 Budget are yet another example of the Government’s commitment to cutting red tape and streamlining services,” Mr Dutton said.

May 14, 2015

Endeavour-Executive-FellowshipThe Australian Government’s Department of Education and Training is inviting  applications for the Endeavour Postgraduate Awards. The awards provide full financial support to international students to pursue

  • a postgraduate qualification at a master’s (up to two years) or
  • PhD level (up to four years) either by coursework or research in any field of study in Australia.

The scholarships include travel allowance AUD 3,000, establishment allowance of AUD 4,000 , monthly spending (AUD 3,000) up to maximum programme duration on a pro-rata basis. Health and travel insurance will also be ­provided.
Endeavour Scholarship recipients will also receive tuition fees (includes student service and amenities fees) paid up to the maximum study/research duration on a pro-rata basis. To be eligible, applicants must commence their proposed programme after January 1, 2016, and not later than November 30, 2016.
Applicants need to provide either

  • letter of admission for a PhD course at an Australian university for the 2016 academic year or
  • letter of admission/ for a master’s or graduate diploma leading to a master’s course at an Australian university for the 2016 academic year.

Since 2007, a total of 3,818 Endeavour Scholarships and Fellowships have been awarded to internationals and 1,036 have been received by Australians to undertake research, study or professional development across 125 eligible countries.
What Endeavour offers
As a scholarship or fellowship recipient, you will gain invaluable international experience in study, research or professional development.
The department has engaged a contractor to provide post-selection support services to all recipients including: a dedicated case manager, pre-departure briefings, advice on health, travel insurance, accommodation, security; payment of allowances, and reporting to the department on the recipient’s progress.
Learn more about what Endeavour can offer through:

For more details, visit here . Deadline for submitting applications is June 30 2015.

May 5, 2015

Australian PassportThe Productivity Commission has floated the idea of selling the right to immigrate, but politicians aren’t sure it’s such a good idea.
The Australian government would sell the right to immigrate to Australia – with migrants no longer accepted based on their skills or family connections – under radical proposals being examined by the government’s independent think tank.
The Productivity Commission is investigating a price-based immigration system that would use entry fees as the primary determinant for who gains entry to Australia.
The scheme could help the government rein in the budget deficit by bringing in tens of billions of dollars in extra revenue.
The scheme could help the government rein in the budget deficit by bringing in tens of billions of dollars in extra revenue.
Such a scheme could help the government rein in the budget deficit by bringing in tens of billions of dollars in extra revenue and allow it to trim the number of public servants administering Australia’s immigration system.
But the proposals have alarmed business groups and unions, who say tackling skills shortages should remain the focus of Australia’s immigration policy. Ethnic community groups say they would oppose any moves that would prevent poorer immigrants from re-uniting with their families.
The Productivity Commission issues paper on Australia’s migrant intake, released on Friday, raises some dramatic proposals including introducing an immigration lottery and creating a HECS-style payment system for immigrants to pay back their entry fee.
The Australian migration program issues permanent residency visas to three streams of migrants: those with particular skills; those with families in Australia; and others who meet special eligibility criteria.
The government established the inquiry, which will issue its final report next March, in a deal to secure Liberal Democrat Senator David Leyonhjelm’s support for the reintroduction of temporary protection visas for asylum seekers.
In its issues paper, the Productivity Commission canvasses two options to introduce an “immigration fee”: setting a price, with the size of the intake dictated by demand; or setting a cap on the intake and allowing demand to dictate the price of entry.
The commission notes there are also middle ground options such as allowing a capped number of places to be allocated via a tender process. The United States – whose immigration program is less skills-focussed than Australia’s – uses a “diversity lottery” to allocate up to 50,000 places a year to applicants from countries with low rates of immigration to the US.
The inability of many hopeful immigrants to pay upfront could be addressed by allowing them to borrow against future expected earnings or by introducing a loans program.
The commission notes that introducing a price-based system could lead to some loss of government control over Australia’s immigrant intake and could change the composition of those who apply to migrate to Australia.
Senator Leyonhjelm said that a fee-based immigration system had been  backed by Nobel Prize-winning economist Gary Becker. Senator Leyonhjelm nominated $50,000 as a possible amount for entry to Australia.
“This would make a substantial financial contribution to the Australian budget and I hope that would lead to lower taxes,” he said.
Businesses needing skilled migrants could pay the fee or governments could waive the fee for particular professions or trades, he said.
Immigration Minister Peter Dutton said that the proposals were not government policy when releasing the inquiry’s terms of reference earlier this year.
“The government is keen to see the Productivity Commission analyse these issues thoroughly, however there are no plans to make significant changes to the migration program,” he said.
Australia uses a mix of qualitative factors (such as skills) and charges in its immigration process, he said.
Australian Industry Group chief executive Innes Willox, said that “skilled migrants should remain the primary source of new entrants”.
Australian Council of Trade Unions President Ged Kearney said: “We are concerned the Productivity Commission’s inquiry is focused on allowing only those rich enough  to migrate regardless of fulfilling the current requirements, including filling skills shortages.”
The Productivity Commission will release a draft report in November and hold public hearings before it hands its final report to government next March.
 
Source: www.smh.com.au