September 19, 2020

Research shows that Australia continues to be one of the most affordable overseas study destinations, with costs of living and course fees significantly lower than the USA and UK. Reports that Australia will significantly increase tuition fees and other costs are not correct. In spite of its small population, Australia has the third largest number of international students of English speaking nations.

Research shows that Australia continues to be one of the most affordable overseas study destinations, with costs of living and course fees significantly lower than the USA and UK. Reports that Australia will significantly increase tuition fees and other costs are not correct. In spite of its small population, Australia has the third largest number of international students of English speaking nations.

Reasons to be cheerful: Australia adds up for international students

New data from English language testing company IDP Education is sending an upbeat signal to Australian universities that international students may be ready to come back in big numbers as COVID-19 begins to receding.

When IDP Education published its results in August it said anecdotally 74 per cent of overseas students wanted to resume their studies once the pandemic was over.

“International students know the cost of study in Australia and they know the limits of post-study work rights, but they are still keen to come,” says Andrew Barkla from IDP Education.

In an interview with The Australian Financial Review on Thursday, chief executive Andrew Barkla said the company now had hard numbers showing “a pipeline of 82,000 students who have applications for the next six months and are ready to go”.

Given Australia accounts for 47 per cent of the student volumes that IDP places internationally, Mr Barkla agreed it was reasonable to expect at least 38,000 customers of the company were thinking of coming to Australia.

And given that 120,000 international enrolments could be expected in Australian universities in 2021, the fact that one provider alone could speak for up to a third of that volume was encouraging.

IDP has a dominant position with the International English Language Testing System, which it developed with the British Council and Cambridge University.

“These are students who want an onshore campus experience. But more than that they know their circumstances,” Mr Barkla said.

“They understand the price the universities charge. They know the cost of living and how the dials are set for post-study work rights. So they have the complete picture and they still want to come.”

The next step was for government to send a signal that the door is open to international students. Pilot programs to fly students to Australia were important even if the numbers were only small because they signalled a government commitment to the scheme.

Pilot programs needed

“We need to get these pilot programs moving. We need a level of public confidence so students and families see they can be done in a secure and safe way that benefits the public as well as the students,” Mr Barkla said.

“Pilot programs are a signpost that Australia is prioritising the opening up of the international sector.”

The Northern Territory said it would accept 100 international students and South Australia will take 300, although neither has committed to a date. By contrast, the UK is taking any international student arrivals and Canada is accepting any who can proved face-to-face teaching is their only option.

Australia also had not done as well as Canada and the UK in supporting students stuck in the country during the ban on international travel.

But on post-study work rights, which are important for international students who want work in their host country to pay off education, Australia was “not doing too badly”, Mr Barkla said.

A single reform to post-study work rights would make a difference: allowing overseas students who are studying online to include the online study they do in their home country towards a work-visa entitlement, instead of being able to include only those hours physically studying in Australia.

He doubted there would be a long-term setback from Australia’s political dissonance with China.

“The Chinese family who is looking to send their child overseas – they are pretty savvy. And they’re pretty connected beyond what they read in the Chinese press,” Mr Barkla said.

Interest to study in Australia increasing

“I’ve been in webinars and on roadshows in China and, looking forward, the interest in Australia and the UK as a study destination is increasing. If anything, it’s the geopolitical tension between China and that US gets more attention.

“So the number of parents who would normally be looking to the US are now shifting their interest to the UK or Australia.”

In a recent interview with the Financial Review the vice-chancellor of the University of NSW, Ian Jacobs, said he was optimistic on the outlook for universities because demand for education was moving to a higher level.

“In the 19th century, primary education was extended to most people. In the 20th century, it was secondary education. In the 21st century, tertiary education will be available to all,” he said.

“And Australia is placed to deliver that, face-to-face, online, short or long courses, undergraduate and postgraduate.”

His optimism is shared by Mr Barkla. After in initial pandemic-related fall, IDP’s English language testing volumes have returned to 55 per cent of what they were pre-COVID-19.

As restrictions ease the company has plans to open another 50 labs globally to add capacity.

IDP Education has a business model universities would envy, and could possibly learn from.

When COVID-19 hit Mr Barkla asked staff to accept a 20 per cent cut in salary (a higher percentage for senior executives), and in return he would guarantee no job losses. Within five days 100 per cent of staff had signed up.

At the height of the crisis it raised $250 million in the market to bolster its cash position, and so far it has burned through just $27 million.

 

Source: Australian Financial Review

October 3, 2008

From 26 April 2008, all student visas will be granted with work rights attached. This will remove the need for the majority of international students to make a separate application for a student visa with permission to work in Australia. This will reduce red-tape for student visa holders by streamlining the visa application process.

While student visa holders will have work rights automatically included in their visa grant, the work conditions themselves will not change. Students and their dependents will still be restricted from undertaking work until the student has commenced their course in Australia. Students will remain subject to a 20 hours per week work limitation while their course is in

session (excluding work undertaken as a registered component of the course). Their dependents will also remain subject to a 20 hours per week work limitation, except for dependents of students who have commenced a Masters or Doctorate course who will be able to work unlimited hours.

To accommodate the new arrangements, the Student Visa Application Charge will increase by AUD$20 to AUD$450 from 26 April 2008. This represents a saving of $40 for the majority of student visa holders who were previously required to pay $430 on initial application and a further $60 in Australia for permission to work.

Visa Label-Free initiative:

The Department is expanding visa label-free arrangements to further groups of students from 26 April 2008. The Department has traditionally placed visa labels in the passports of student visa holders as evidence of their permission to enter Australia and conditions of stay. This has become unnecessary as all visa information is stored and can be accessed electronically through the Department’s Visa Entitlement Verification Online (VEVO) service. Clients can access VEVO at any time to check information such as their visa subclass, visa conditions and period of stay. Further, with the permission of the visa holder, employers, education providers, government agencies and other organisations can access VEVO to check visa entitlements such as restrictions on work and study.

Label-free travel is already open to all Assessment Level 1 students applying through eVisa. It will now be extended to students from India, Indonesia and Thailand participating in the Assessment Level 2-4 eVisa trial. For the time being, students from the People’s Republic of China will still need a visa label to facilitate their travel to Australia.

Source: DIMIA

September 22, 2008
September 22, 2008

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AUSTRALIA !!! Best Place to study higher education or learn English in the world!!!

Let us to show why Australia is the first choice study destination for so many international students?

Many countries around the world now have quality assured, comprehensive study programs providing all levels of education for international students. So, why study in Australia?

First of all Australia is the second best country to live in the world, behind the Norway according to United Nation Development Program (UNDP) that ranks 182 countries based on such criteria as life expectancy, literacy, school enrolment, gross domestic product per capita (GDP), etc. The United States ranks 13th and the UK ranks 21st.

Second, according to latest THES World University Rankings, 8 Australian Universities has been listed in top 100 Universities of the world. 22 of the 42 Australian Universities have been ranked in top 400 Universities of the world.

Third, if you consider tuition fee and living expensive, Australia provide same or better quality higher education with UK and USA but with a half or one third of the overall cost when compared to UK and USA.

Fourth, Australia one of the few countries in the world that climate is very convenient to enjoy life and very rich with natural wonders.  And so on. If you want to get full picture why Australia chosen by hundred of thousands of international students every year

 
 
Excellence in Education Standards
Australia offers internationally recognised education and training programs, and quality-assured qualifications and rank amongst the highest in the world. These qualifications, plus the life experience that students gain by living in Australia, are both seen as highly valuable ‘resume builders’ to prospective any international employers. .
A large numbersof networks of support exist to help students in all aspects of their stay in Australia
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Good Value for Money

Research shows that Australia continues to be one of the most affordable overseas study destinations, with costs of living andcourse fees significantly lower than the USA and UK. Reports thatAustralia will significantly increase tuition fees and other costs arenot correct. In spite of its small population, Australia has the thirdlargest number of international students of English speaking nations.

Contact us for further information

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Safety

Australia is a politically very stable democracy with a very friendly people. Australia is also genuinely cosmopolitan, meaning that regardless of which corner of the globe youcome from, you will be welcome. Sydney and Melbourne are continuouslyselected as two of the top 10 cities in the world in terms of safety,social cohesion, human rights, living cost and environmental issues. Australia is one of the top country seen by international students as a safe place to live and study. These conditions enable students to focus on their studies while they are making many friends from all over the world and experience the Australian way of life.

Multiculturalism

Australia is also genuinely Multicultural, meaning that regardless of which corner of the globe youcome from, you will be welcome. Almost a quarter of the population living in  Sydney and Melbourne are oversea born.
Particularly since the tragic events of September 11 in 2001, Australia isseen by international students as a safe place to live and study. These conditions enable students to focus on their studies while they are making many friends from all over the world and experience the Australian way of life.
 
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