November 9, 2012

 

Professor Lesleyanne Hawthorne writes:

Amid Australia’s ongoing doctor shortage, the health system risks losing dozens of Australian-trained, foreign-born doctors because of a shortage of intern places. The Australian Medical Students Association estimates the system needs 182 intern places to ensure all international students can finish their medical training and gain full registration as doctors.

These intern, (or post-graduate year one) places, are based in hospitals, which are run by the states. But the Commonwealth also bears some funding responsibility for medical training. The Commonwealth, state and territory health ministers are expected to discuss who should pay and potential solutions to the problem when they meet tomorrow in Perth.

Rise of international student migration

Over the past decade, international students have emerged as a prized and contested human capital resource. OECD and select Asian countries are expanding their international student flows, through global promotion strategies and regional migration programs, aligned with lower entry requirements, including for medical degrees.

International students have been immensely responsive to these migration options. In 1975, 600,000 international students were enrolled abroad, compared with 3.4 million in 2009. By 2025, it is predicted there will be 7.2 million international students studying globally.

A recent British Council survey of 153,000 international students confirmed opportunities for migration exert an extraordinary impact on the choice of study destination. While students sought a high quality, internationally recognised education, the scope to remain and work was found to “massively impact” both decisions and expectations.

 

In 1999, following the removal of a three-year eligibility bar, international students became immediately eligible to migrate to Australia. Within six years of the policy change, 52% of skilled migrants were selected onshore.

By 2010, 630,000 international students were enrolled in Australian courses (all fields and sectors). Of these, 18,487 were undertaking health degrees, including over 3,000 medical and 10,000 nursing students. International medical student graduates grew 223% from 1999 to 2009, compared with 52% growth in Australian domestic graduates.

International medical students

In 2009, the majority of international medical students were enrolled at

  • Monash,
  • Melbourne,
  • Queensland,
  • New South Wales and
  • Sydney universities.

Their source countries were highly diverse – most notably

  • Malaysia (1,134 students),
  • Singapore (577),
  • Canada (437),
  • the United States (84) and
  • Botswana (74), followed by
  • South Korea,
  • Brunei,
  • Hong Kong,
  • Indonesia and
  • Sri Lanka.

These international students achieve stellar rates of immediate employment and are highly attractive to local employers. As demonstrated by yet-to-be-published research conducted for the Medical Deans of Australia, 45% of international students plan to remain in Australia when they commence their studies. By their final year, 78% accept intern places (virtually all those who are not scholarship students sponsored by their home governments).

Australia’s Graduate Destination Survey from 2009-2011 reveals their employment outcomes to be near identical to those achieved by domestic students (99.6% working full-time at four months compared with 99.7%). The source country was almost irrelevant, with 100% of Canadian, US, Malaysian, Indonesian, Taiwanese, Norwegian and Botswanan students fully employed, compared with 97% from Singapore and 89% from China.

International medical graduates

As affirmed by the OECD, Australia has developed extraordinary reliance on international medical graduates (IMGs), who gain their qualifications overseas.

 

By 2006, 45% of Australian residents holding medical qualifications were overseas-born, including an estimated 25% who were overseas-qualified. The United Kingdom/Ireland, China, India, North Africa/ Middle East, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, South Africa and the Philippines were major sources of migration.

This diversification of supply has proven extremely challenging for Australia. The 2006 census shows just 53% of IMGs secured medical employment in Australia in their first five years of residence (across all immigration categories).

Doctors from English-speaking background countries moved seamlessly into work, while Commonwealth-Asian doctors fared reasonably. Outcomes were poor, by contrast, for many birthplace groups. Just 6% of doctors from China found medical employment within five years, along with 23% from Vietnam and 31% from Eastern Europe.

 

Employment access is significantly better for IMGs selected through the 457 visa temporary sponsored pathway. From 2005-06 to 2010-11 17,910 doctors were sponsored as temporary 457 visa migrants to pre-arranged jobs, with a 99% immediate employment rate.

From 2004-05 to 2010-11, an additional 2,790 IMGs were admitted through the permanent General Skilled Migration category. But not all passed the Australian Medical Council examinations, which are a requirement for unconditional registration in Australia. From 1978 to 2010, 82% of candidates passed the MCQ (the standard theoretical examination), typically on their first or second attempt, along with 85% of clinical candidates. But overall AMC completion rates were just 43%, since many choose not to persist with the process.

Large numbers of IMGs face significant barriers to securing professional registration. By contrast, international medical students face no impediments: they’re of prime workforce age (far younger than IMGs) and have self-funded to meet Australian domestic requirements.

Medical students’ future

We know that large numbers of international medical students wish to migrate to Australia – and access to intern places is critical for them to secure permanent resident status.

If Australia fails to retain these graduates, other countries will. Singapore, for instance, actively recruits in Australia, in a context where the nation’s fertility rate is incredibly low. New Zealand annually registers over 1,200 IMGs per year, but two-thirds will have left within two years. So there is major interest in attracting Australian-trained graduates.

If Australia is serious about retaining international medical students in the future, it’s vital to provide access to intern training places. While the students’ long-term intentions are unknown, it’s clear they have great potential to address Australian workforce shortages in the future.

 

** Lesleyanne Hawthorne is Professor of International Health Workforce, at the Australian Health Workforce Institute, University of Melbourne

This article was first published by The Conversation. A reminder to www.mystudyinaustralia.com readers that TC articles are freely available for republishing under a creative commons licence.

September 10, 2012

 

IEA-A glad to announce that TAFE NSW offers international students an opportunity to undertake Diplomas in Hospitality and Events at the same time with “guaranteed” paid work. In addition to that students can directly start to final year of the Bachelor of Business Degree Program. In total three years, three internationally recognised qualification:

–          Diploma of Hospitality

–          Diploma of Events

–          Bachelor of Business

–          and 3 years work experience

During “guaranteed” paid employment placements (minimum “guaranteed” 10 hours per week with $23 hourly rate). Students can start the work after completing first 3 months of the Hospitality diploma program. Students legally can work 20 hours per week during school weeks and full time during the holidays.

 

English Entry requirements:

  • IELTS 5.5 or equivalent

–          $6325 per semester ( total 4 semester in 2 year programs).

Fee covers tuition, uniforms, texts and registration with Work Solutions for paid employment.

Advantages

  • Two               Diplomas in 2 years or
  • Two diplomas + Bachelor of Business Degree in 3 years
    • Complete a Bachelor of Business with one more year of study in the Blue Mountains International Hotel Management School
    • 2 years paid work experience at Australian Turf Club (ATC), Rosehill Gardens (2008 Restaurant and Catering NSW/ACT Award for Excellence’ and finalist in the ‘Venue Caterer’ category).

Intake

TAFETR English Course Oct 2012, Feb 2013

TAFENSW SWSI Diploma February, April, June, Sep 2013

Students need to start Diploma of Hospitality course (C18115) first and then Diploma of Events course (C18075). The Hospitality course starts on Feb, Apr, Jul, Sep in 2013 and offered at Campbelltown campus. You can find both courses details at the following link

http://www.detinternational.nsw.edu.au/tafe/courses/certificate_diploma_courses/cC18115.html

http://www.detinternational.nsw.edu.au/tafe/courses/certificate_diploma_courses/cC18075.html

Number of hours work placement

Students              gain a minimum               of 10 hours paid work a week (after a training period of 3 months without pay) during the course. They also have the opportunity for further work at major events in Sydney such as ANZ Stadium and the Easter show. The minimum hourly wage is $23/hour.

 

Career Opportunities

•     Cafe/Coffee Shop Operator

•     Hotel Service Supervisor

•     Hotel/Motel Manager

•     Event managers

•     Resort management

•     Event Coordinator

•     Venue coordinator

•     Conference coordinator

•     Exhibition coordinator

•     Event manager

•     Venue manager

•     Conference manager

•     Exhibition manager

 

Degree pathway

Diploma  graduates can gain credit of up to two years in either the Bachelor of Business (International Hotel and Resort Management) or Bachelor of Business (International Hotel Management) with our tertiary partner Blue Mountains International Hotel Management School, ranked No: 1 InAustralasia*.

 

* by the Hotel and Tourism industry-conducted by Taylor Nelson Sofres (TNS) PLC in the United Kingdom, the world’s largest provider of custom research and analysis.

 

There are very limited number of places are available, so please make required announcement to your student base now to not miss this great opportunity.

 

For further information about the course, college locations and how to apply visit our website

www.mystudyinaustralia.com www.tafetr.net www.tafensw.edu.au

sydney@inteducation.com / info@tafetr.com

April 11, 2012

The changes to the permanent employer sponsored visas (ENS and RSMS) coming in on 1 July 2012 are quite significant. One of the main intentions behind the changes to the ENS/RSMS programs is to streamline the process of applying for permanent residence whilst holding a 457 visa.

People will be affected differently by the new changes depending on their circumstances. This article goes through the main winners under the new system.

ENS/RSMS Eligibility Streams

The requirements for ENS and RSMS vary depending on which “eligibility stream” you apply under from 1 July. To appreciate the impact of the changes, it’s important to have an understanding of the eligibility streams:

Temporary Residence Transition:

where applicants have worked with the employer on a 457 visa for the last 2 years. Applicants in this category have a streamlined pathway onto permanent residence through ENS and RSMS from 1 July.

Direct Entry Stream:

for applicants who have not worked in Australia, or who have worked in Australia on a visa other than a 457 visa. Criteria for these applicants are higher – for ENS they must have a skills assessment and 3 years of work experience in their occupation, and RSMS applicants must get approval from a Regional Certifying Body and may also require skills assessment.

Agreement Stream:

for applicants whose employer has a Labour Agreement. Labour agreements are special arrangements individually negotiated with the Department of Immigration, and allow sponsorship in a wider range of occupations and are required for the “on-hire” or “labour hire” industry.

1. People on 457 visas in non-ENS occupations

There are many people on 457 visas who have been sponsored in an occupation which is not on the current ENS Occupations List.

Examples of such occupations include:

  • Cafe or Restaurant Manager
  • Customer Service Managers
  • Various IT specialisations
  • Intermediate service managers (eg
  • Divers and Diving Instructors
  • Farmers

People sponsored for 457 visas in these occupations are currently on a “road to nowhere” – they can stay in Australia on 457 visas, but have limited options in applying for permanent residence.

From 1 July 2012, there will be a single consolidated list of occupations which applies to 457, ENS and State/Territory Sponsored Skilled Visas.

As a result, people already on a 457 visa will be able to look at an ENS visa once they have worked with their employer on a 457 visa in their occupation for 2 years, even if their occupation is not on the current ENS list.

2. Applicants between 45 and 50 years of Age

The age limit for ENS and RSMS visas will increase from 45 to 50 from 1 July 2012.

As a result, applicants between 45 and 50 will be able to qualify for an ENS or RSMS visa without needing to show Exceptional Circumstances.

3. Applicants over 60 years on 457 visas

Under current arrangements, it is extremely difficult for applicants aged over 60 to obtain an ENS or RSMS visa. Under current DIAC policy, applicants must show that they will make a significant economic contribution to Australia and have a very high salary level ($213,000 or more).

From 1 July 2012, applicants who have worked for their employer for the last 4 years on a 457 visa and who have a salary of over $118,000 should be eligible for an exemption to the age requirement.

This will make it far more possible for applicants over 60 to qualify for migration under the Employer Nomination Scheme.

 

November 3, 2011
November 3, 2011

The Minister for Immigration and Citizenship, Chris Bowen MP, today announced businesses using the subclass 457 visa program can now gain access to priority processing and approval for six years under a new accreditation scheme.

‘This new scheme recognises that many Australian businesses have a long history of dealing with the Department of Immigration and Citizenship (DIAC) and an excellent record of compliance with workplace and migration laws,’ Mr Bowen said.

‘From 7 November, these businesses will be able to seek accreditation that qualifies them for sponsorship approval of six years rather than the current three, as well as ensuring faster processing times for all future subclass 457 nominations and visa applications.’

Businesses will need to meet certain additional benchmarks to qualify for accredited status, including being an active 457 visa sponsor for the past three years and a commitment to ensuring at least 75 per cent of their domestic workforce is Australian.

‘While employers should first look to Australians to fill skill vacancies, the subclass 457 visa provides a fast and flexible process for the entry of overseas workers where they are needed to fill skill vacancies,’ Mr Bowen said.

‘The new accreditation scheme was developed in consultation with the Skilled Migration Consultative Panel, which includes representatives from major employer groups, unions and state governments.’

The 2011 KPMG Skilled Migration Survey of employers found that the subclass 457 visa program provided a flexible avenue to alleviate skill shortages in growth sectors such as the mining industry.

Use of the subclass 457 visa program is increasing, with 54 360 subclass 457 primary visas granted in 2010–11, an increase of 38.2 per cent compared to the same period the year before. The UK was the most popular source country, with 11 820 primary applicants granted visas.

The median processing time for a subclass 457 visa remains at a historically low level of 22 days.

Minister Bowen has announced that DIAC will introduce a Sponsorship Accreditation system from Monday 7 November 2011.

Employers can apply for Accredited Sponsor status to qualify for priority processing for Subclass 457 visa nominations and visa applications.

Accredited Sponsor status is valid for six years, unless it is revoked because the employer no longer meets the required criteria.

Accreditation status is for employers with have a long and positive history of dealing with the Department and an excellent record of compliance with workplace and migration laws.

Applications for Accredited Sponsor status are made in the same way as applications for approval as a Standard Business Sponsorship applications, online or using Form 1196S.

A company must meet all the following criteria to gain Accredited Sponsor status:

  • be a government agency, a publicly listed company, or a private company, with a minimum of $4 million turnover per year over the last three years;
  • have been an active Subclass 457 visa sponsor for the past three years (with a break of no more than six months, which was not due to any sanction);
  • have no adverse information known of it based on DIAC and DEEWR monitoring, including formal warnings and sanctions;
  • have had at least 30 primary Subclass 457 visa applications granted in the previous 12 months;
  • have lodged a high level of Decision Ready applications over the previous two years;
  • have a non-approval rate of less than three percent during the previous three years; and
  • have Australian workers comprising at least 75 percent of its workforce in Australia, and have made a commitment to maintain this level.

Information on sponsorship accreditation is on the DIAC website, with further information to be available on Monday 7 November.

October 15, 2011

Unbelievable Scholarship on Australian MBA and Master Programs

  • MBA, Project and Program Management – 2 years
  • Study online  $12,500 or Study on-campus $15,500

 

  • MBPM, Master of Business and Project Management – 1.5 years
  • Study online $10,300 or Study on-campus $12,800

 

  • MBM, Master of Business Management Study – 1.5 years
  • online  $10,300 or Study on-campus $12,800

Project Management Courses at Australia’s Premier School of Project and Program Management offering.

www.apicollege.edu.au

  • Project Management Courses at APIC are formally accredited and recognised in Australia. We offer Postgraduate degree in Project Management and Business Management. APIC is an Australian higher education institution offering Business and project management postgraduate degrees, MBA, Master, Graduate Programs.

The next offering is on March 2012. There are limited spaces, do not miss this opportunity.

For further information and applications

info@tafetr.cominfo@inteducation.comsydney@inteducation.com

+90 212 244 1619 | +90 312 495 1608  | + 61 415 127 055

October 13, 2011

IEAA can help your kids to study in Australian High School, then direct entry to University.

One of the option is TAYLOR College. Established in 1920, Taylors College provides world-class secondary school education (Year 10, 11 and 12) and specialised university preparation programs in partnership with leading universities in Australia and New Zealand.

At Taylors College, the unique learning environment allows students to fulfil their ambitions and to enjoy life at university and beyond. With campuses at central locations in Sydney, Melbourne, Auckland, Taylors College is known throughout the world for its success in preparing students for the rigours of tertiary study and providing the smoothest transition to help them achieve the career of their dreams.

English Language Preparation Program (TELP)

The Taylors English Language Preparation program, taught by experienced teachers and delivered in 12 week terms, will prepare you to study their High School or Foundation Programs in Australia or New Zealand.

High School Programs in Australia (Year 10, Year 11 and Year 12)

Taylors College High School program is the passport to the best universities in the world.

Taylors College delivers the final three years of Australian secondary education (Years 10, 11 and 12) for the following qualifications at Melbourne and Sydney campuses and Years10, 11at Perth campus

  • Victorian Certificate of Education (Victoria)
  • Tertiary Entrance Examination (TEE)
  • Higher School Certificate (NSW)

University Foundation program

Taylors College Foundation Programs are unique, dedicated pathways to some of the most prestigious universities in Australia and New Zealand. The Foundation programs are run exclusively at Taylors College campuses in Sydney, Perth and Auckland.

  • Taylors Auckland Foundation Year (TAFY)
  • The University of Sydney Foundation Program (USFP)
  • The University of Western Australia Foundation Program (UWAFP)

Partner Universities in Australia and New Zealand

  • University of Sydney, Sydney
  • Monash University, Melbourne
  • University of Western Australia, Perth
  • University of Auckland, Auckland
  • Auckland University of Technology (AUT), Auckland
  • Massey University, Auckland
for further information please write to sydney@inteducation.com
October 3, 2011

 

Australia’s 39 universities are preparing for a brand new day in 2012: not only will government quotas on the number of local students they enrol be lifted, but they will also be able to recruit as many foreigners as they wish as a result of a new fast-track visa system.

In an unexpectedly generous move that surprised even sceptical vice-chancellors, the federal government decided to lift most restrictions on the issuing of student visas to overseas students applying for a university place, opening the way for a likely flood of new applications from China, India, Pakistan and other Asian countries.

Universities that agree to meet certain requirements regarding the students they admit will also have access to a new streamlined system that will speed up visa processing.

The government’s imposition of tighter visa rules two years ago was a reaction to dodgy college operators using vocational education courses as a front for their clients to obtain permanent residency visas. As tens of thousands of students enrolled in cooking and hairdressing courses in the hope of staying on after completion, a debate began to rage about Australia allowing relatively unskilled migrants with poor English into the country.

The stricter visa rules also applied to applicants seeking university places while, at the same time, the Australian dollar began rising sharply against the US dollar. These changes made obtaining a visa to study here harder and more expensive than in Canada or the US; and as the number of full-fee international students fell sharply, universities suddenly found a significant source of non-government income drying up.

In 2009, the estimated economic benefit to Australia of having nearly 500,000 fee-paying foreign students enrolled in schools, colleges and universities was AUD18 billion (US$18 billion); two years later this had fallen by AUD2 billion.

As vice-chancellor protests became louder, the government appointed a former New South Wales Labor government minister, Michael Knight, to review the situation.

In a 150-page report just released, Knight proposed a series of changes he claimed would boost the competitiveness of Australian universities in the global student marketplace. Although his 41 recommendations apply mostly to universities, the changes effectively give vice-chancellors almost total freedom to recruit as many foreign students as they want.

To the surprise of every higher education lobby group, the government accepted all the recommendations and promised to implement them before the start of second semester next year.

Among the changes expected to improve the attractiveness of Australian higher education is the scrapping of a rule requiring foreign students to prove they have enough money saved to allow them to study in the country for two years.

A student from China, by far Australia’s biggest source of international students, at present must have access to at least AUD100,000 to obtain a visa. From mid-2012, however, students will only need to declare they can afford to pay tuition and living costs. As well, those who graduate with at least a bachelor degree from a university will be able to stay on and work for up to four years and will not be tied to any particular occupation.

“All applicants will still be subject to basic requirements such as having health insurance and not being a security or health risk. And the Department of Immigration will reserve the right to look separately at applications from any group that poses a particular concern,” Knight says in his report.

“However, beyond those basic requirements, [the Department] will effectively take the university’s word that the student is suitable. Therefore universities can be confident their students will have their applications processed quickly.”

But Knight warns that “these substantial benefits” come with significant obligations: universities will be accountable for the visa outcomes of their students. If these outcomes are consistently poor, the university will be removed from the streamlined processing arrangements and prospective students will be processed under the existing rules.

Despite universities being subject to government “checks and balances and integrity measures” before gaining access to the new streamlined visa procedures, critics say the changes will open the doors to a new wave of foreign student workers who, after graduating, will compete with Australians for jobs and add to the thousands already seeking to stay on a permanent residents.

Monash University social scientist and demographer Dr Bob Birrell said past experience showed that thousands of students from poorer families who could not meet the costs of fees and living expenses were now likely to apply for university. Birrell, founder of Monash’s Centre for Population and Urban Research, said the result would be a significant influx of students seeking through a university education to gain access to the Australian labour market.

“We have had repeated examples of this in the past, starting with the English language college debacle of the late 1980s and more recently the vocational college debacle over cooks and hairdressers,” he said. “I’m amazed the Immigration Department has gone along with this because they know what happened in the past.”

Another critic, Peter Holden, said Knight’s decision to confine the changes to universities was against federal government policy, which wanted an integrated tertiary sector with a single regulatory body. “His old-school approach reinforces outdated stereotypes and elitist views of post-secondary education,” Holden said.

“Knight’s reasoning is that if things go off the rails it will be easier for the Department of Immigration to rein in universities because there are only 39 of them. This is not exactly a ringing endorsement of high quality and low risk. As Knight admits, universities are not perfect.”

Holden is director of international engagement for TAFE Directors Australia, the heads of the country’s public technical and further education colleges. Writing in The Australian newspaper’s higher education section, he said one in five students in Australia’s universities was from overseas – among the highest ratios in the world.

“For the whole public vocational education sector, including all qualification levels, the ratio is less than one in 27. In terms of stability, TAFE institutes are equally well-managed with high levels of accountability and transparency.

“The Knight review perpetuates the flawed impression the problem lies within the vocational education and training sector, as though it can be treated as one amorphous whole.”

Source: Geoff Maslen / 02 October 2011 / Issue: 191  /university world news

 

August 21, 2011

Parents – secure your childs future

The University of Queensland Foundation Year (UQFY) program prepares international students for entry into the first year of all undergraduate courses at UQ. Students from more than 40 countries are enrolled on this course. Graduates enter all faculties of UQ including Arts, Sciences, Business Economics and Law, Engineering, Architecture and IT, Health Sciences, Social and Behavioural Sciences, Natural Resources, Agriculture and Veterinary Sciences. Graduates of the program also enjoy a high measure of academic success at UQ. Studies undertaken indicate that UQFY alumni have an average GPA higher than that of other international students.

Since the program commenced, UQFY has become one of the most respected foundation programs in Australia with more than 85% of students continuing on to study undergraduate programs at UQ. To date, more than 3,000 undergraduate students who have entered UQ through UQFY.

The University of Queensland (Ranked third in Australia) was ranked as one of the top 50 universities in the world by the QS World University Rankings. The quality of the delivery can be judged by the teaching staff and their experience. Here are some of the teachers on the Foundation programmes:

Dr Peter Munro BSc (UQ, Hons Chem) PhD (UQ, Biochem) – CHEMISTRY CO-ORDINATOR

Peter taught for ten years in primary and lower-secondary Catholic schools in country Queensland. He enjoyed teaching but also wanted to gain a Bachelor of Science. He entered The University of Queensland as a mature age student in 1985 and studied chemistry, mathematics and physics. He enjoyed university so much that he stayed on to complete his PhD in 1994.

He moved to the USA for three years to undertake research work in the computer simulation of living systems. He returned to teaching in 2000 and taught maths and science in various high schools around Brisbane. He started teaching on the Foundation programme in 2008. His varied background gives him a good insight into the different paths open to university students. He enjoyed playing rugby and cricket when he was younger. Now, he is a keen bridge player.

Mr Max King – B.Arts (Mathematics), Teaching Diploma – DIRECTOR OF STUDIES

Teaches Mathematics on the UQ Foundation Year program since its inception in 1998. Mathematics has always been one of his passions and he really enjoys the interaction with students in the classroom. Some people tell him he is crazy because he also enjoys the timetabling part of his job.

It is treated like a mathematical puzzle and he tries to come up with the best possible solution to the problem to ensure that students are able to select a variety of subjects and not miss out because of conflicts.

Mr David Hooper – BAppSc (Biol)-QUT, Grad Dip Teaching (Science)-QUT – BIOLOGY CO-ORDINATOR

 

David has been a science teacher since 1985, with much of this time spent as the Head of Science in various public schools throughout Queensland. He has been the Biology Co-ordinator since 2000 and enjoys interacting with his students and how they politely laugh at all of his jokes!

The field excursion to North Stradbroke Island is a highlight of the course as it allows students to work with teachers outside of class and interact with nature. Most of his spare time is spent with his family, but he also has a long-standing interest in aviation, nature conservation and food! His latest passion is travel, and he has recently visited Hong Kong, Japan and Malaysia.

Mr Theo Skordilis – MEd (Leadership), BEd(Phys/Chem), Dip Teach (Sc/Ma) – PHYSICS CO-ORDINATOR

Theo coordinates and teaches the Physics program and has also taught Chemistry for many years. Being a migrant and of Greek origin, Theo is well aware of the language, social and emotional needs of international students. Theo is a very experienced and innovative teacher having worked in many private colleges since 1985.

 

Source: Sunday Times, 21 Augusrt 2011

May 27, 2011

 

The Endeavour Awards is the Australian Government’s internationally competitive, merit-based scholarship program providing opportunities for citizens of the Asia-Pacific, the Middle East, Europe and the Americas to undertake study, research and professional development in Australia. Awards are also available for Australians to undertake study research and professional development abroad.

 

The Endeavour Awards aim to:

  • Develop ongoing educational, research and professional linkages between individuals, organisations and countries;
  • Provide opportunities for high achieving individuals to increase their skills and enhance their global awareness;
  • Contribute to Australia’s position as a high quality education and training provider, and leader in research and innovation; and
  • Increase the productivity of Australians through an international study, research or professional development experience.

 

The Endeavour Awards are a part of the Australia Awards initiative, which brings together, under a single recognisable brand, the Endeavour Awards run by the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations’ (DEEWR) and the Development Awards offered by AusAID. For further information visit the Australia Awards website at www.AustraliaAwards.gov.au.

 

Award Summary

Award Name

Maximum value

Maximum duration

Study Level

Endeavour Postgraduate Award (incoming only)

A$228,500

Up to 2 years for a Masters; up to 4 years for a PhD

Postgraduate study/research for an Australian Masters degree or PhD

Endeavour Research Fellowships (including Research Fellowships for Indigenous Australians & Endeavour Australia Cheung Kong Research Fellowships)

A$23,500

4 – 6 months

Research towards a Masters degree or PhD in home country; or postdoctoral research

Endeavour Vocational Education and Training (VET) Award (incoming only)

A$119,500

1 – 2.5 years

Diploma, Advanced Diploma, Associate Degree

Endeavour Executive Award

A$18,500

1 – 4 months

Professional development

Prime Minister’s Australia Asia Award (Incoming Postgraduate)

A$263,500

Up to 4 years

+ up to 1 year optional internship

PhD by research;

Prime Minister’s Australia Asia Award Outgoing Postgraduate

A$63,500

Up to 2 years

PhD by research;

Ma by coursework;

Ma by research;

Prime Minister’s Australia Asia Award Outgoing Undergraduate

A$53,500

Up to 2 years

Bachelor Degree;

Honours

July 20, 2010
July 20, 2010

LIVE, WORK and STUDY in AUSTRALIA

MIGRATION TO AUSTRALIA
International Education Agency – Australia and Migration Professionals are working together to help you (and your family) live, work and study in Australia.

Contact us now at migration@inteducation.com for our personal visa eligibility assessment service which includes advice on all your options to live, work and study in Australia. Read More

July 16, 2010
July 16, 2010

Automotive/Mechanical in September

The skill requirements for Australia for the next few years have been identified, with Diesel Mechanics being highlighted as a key requirement.  This is a good sign for students who wish to put their skills into practice as the economy starts to wind back up again.

For further information about the course and availability in September, please contact us or fill out the form.

 

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July 13, 2010

IT Information TechnologyTAFENSW announced a massive promotion on Information technology courses. Students with sufficient Information Technology background and knowledge may reduce their study time 1 full semester, in other terms they can graduate in 3 semesters (1.5 years) instead of 4 semesters (2 years) which that means saving over 5000 AUD and 1 full semester. TAFENSW IT diploma graduates, receive 1 year exemption from most of the Australian Universities towards IT Degrees.

May 24, 2010

TAFENSW announced a massive promotion on Information technology courses. Students with sufficient Information Technology background and knowledge may reduce their study time 1 full semester, in other terms they can graduate in 3 semesters (1.5 years) instead of 4 semesters (2 years) which that means saving over 5000 AUD and 1 full semester.

 

TAFENSW IT diploma graduates, receive 1 year exemption from most of the Australian Universities towards IT Degrees.