November 7, 2013

The number of visa applications granted for overseas students to study in Australia has increased by approximately 4% marking the second year in a row of growth for the sector.

Numbers had previously been falling but the financial year 2012/2013 has seen figures rise with the previous year of 290,761 applications lodged compared with 280,003, according to data from the annual Student Visa Programme Trends report.

In the second quarter of 2013, approximately 93% of visa applications assessed during this period were granted a visa.

The report shows that student visa numbers have returned to a sustainable growth over the last two years and this is part of a broader trend throughout the past 10 years.

The report states that this growth has been driven by applications lodged outside of Australia which increased by 11.1% in the same period and there were 304,251 student visa holders in Australia as of 30 June 2013. Of these visa holders, 23.4% were from China, the largest cohort, followed by 10% from India.

During the June 2013 quarter, 75% of all student visas were processed within 30 days, while 50% were processed within 14 days. About 93% of applications assessed during this period were granted a visa.

International students must have a valid visa for the duration of their studies in Australia. Most international students will need a student visa. However, visitor visas permit up to three months study and working holiday maker visas permit up to four months study.

To be eligible for a student visa, applicants must be accepted for full time study in a course listed on the Commonwealth Register of Institutions and Courses for Overseas Students (CRICOS.) Applicants must also meet financial, health insurance, English language proficiency and character requirements.

There is no limit on the number of student visas issued each year. If applicants meet requirements, they will be granted a student visa. Student visas are issued for the entire period of study in Australia. Visas are issued in alignment with the period for which the applicant has Overseas Student Health Cover (OSHC.)

There are two other visas related to the student visa programme, the Student Guardian (subclass 580) visa and the Temporary Graduate (subclass 485) visa. The Student Guardian visa is for individuals who wish to accompany and care for minors studying in Australia. The Temporary Graduate visa allows international students to live and work in Australia temporarily after they have finished their studies.

Student visas include a condition that, once the course has commenced, allows most students to work for up to 40 hours per fortnight while their course is in session and for unlimited hours during course breaks.

There can be some confusion about working hours but students are urged to make sure that they know what they are permitted to do. ‘The limitation imposed by this visa condition reflects the purpose of a student visa; that it is to allow entry to Australia in order to study, not to work. Secondary visa holders are subject to a visa condition that limits them to 40 hours work per fortnight at any time,’ said an immigration spokesman.

March 8, 2013

 

Nearly three-quarters of Australians believe international students should be encouraged to stay in the country after completing their university studies, according to a survey.

Universities Australia has released research on perceptions of the tertiary sector on the eve of this week’s higher education conference in Canberra.

About 80 per cent of 300 business representatives surveyed and 72 per cent of 1000 members of the public said international students should be encouraged to stay in Australia on completion of their studies, particularly if sponsored by an employer.

”However, some stakeholder respondents have voiced concerns that the university system is perceived to be too heavily reliant on income from international student enrolments,” the report said.

”There is also a view that additional support, for instance with English language learning and better facilities such as affordable student housing, may be required.

”Participants were generally comfortable about the proportion of internationally students, at roughly 20 per cent.”

The study found Australian universities were generally well regarded, with 88 per cent of the surveyed public saying they would encourage their child or young people they knew to attend university.

Most saw the main role of universities to educate for skilled/professional jobs, with far fewer identifying the sector’s contribution to research and development – something Universities Australia described as being of ”some concern”.

Universities Australia chief executive Belinda Robinson said the study showed that people strongly valued international students, who helped build deep cultural ties with their fellow students and the wider community.

”International students are also playing a pivotal role in increasing our engagement with Asian nations during this Asian Century,” she said.

”They are helping Australia forge valuable links with their home countries, providing a cross-cultural dialogue with domestic students and sustaining ongoing relationships with Australia in their post-student lives.”

A spokesman for Universities Australia said the polling involved qualitative and quantitative research, including focus groups and surveys of the public and business.

He said the data was weighted to be representative of the Australian population and the whole business community.

The higher education conference, running from Wednesday to Friday, will include keynote speeches by new Tertiary Education Minister Chris Bowen, Opposition Leader Tony Abbott, Universities Australia chairman Glyn Davis, and former Treasury secretary Ken Henry.

 

By Daniel Hurst Feb. 26, 2013

Source: NewCastle Herald

November 9, 2012

 

Professor Lesleyanne Hawthorne writes:

Amid Australia’s ongoing doctor shortage, the health system risks losing dozens of Australian-trained, foreign-born doctors because of a shortage of intern places. The Australian Medical Students Association estimates the system needs 182 intern places to ensure all international students can finish their medical training and gain full registration as doctors.

These intern, (or post-graduate year one) places, are based in hospitals, which are run by the states. But the Commonwealth also bears some funding responsibility for medical training. The Commonwealth, state and territory health ministers are expected to discuss who should pay and potential solutions to the problem when they meet tomorrow in Perth.

Rise of international student migration

Over the past decade, international students have emerged as a prized and contested human capital resource. OECD and select Asian countries are expanding their international student flows, through global promotion strategies and regional migration programs, aligned with lower entry requirements, including for medical degrees.

International students have been immensely responsive to these migration options. In 1975, 600,000 international students were enrolled abroad, compared with 3.4 million in 2009. By 2025, it is predicted there will be 7.2 million international students studying globally.

A recent British Council survey of 153,000 international students confirmed opportunities for migration exert an extraordinary impact on the choice of study destination. While students sought a high quality, internationally recognised education, the scope to remain and work was found to “massively impact” both decisions and expectations.

 

In 1999, following the removal of a three-year eligibility bar, international students became immediately eligible to migrate to Australia. Within six years of the policy change, 52% of skilled migrants were selected onshore.

By 2010, 630,000 international students were enrolled in Australian courses (all fields and sectors). Of these, 18,487 were undertaking health degrees, including over 3,000 medical and 10,000 nursing students. International medical student graduates grew 223% from 1999 to 2009, compared with 52% growth in Australian domestic graduates.

International medical students

In 2009, the majority of international medical students were enrolled at

  • Monash,
  • Melbourne,
  • Queensland,
  • New South Wales and
  • Sydney universities.

Their source countries were highly diverse – most notably

  • Malaysia (1,134 students),
  • Singapore (577),
  • Canada (437),
  • the United States (84) and
  • Botswana (74), followed by
  • South Korea,
  • Brunei,
  • Hong Kong,
  • Indonesia and
  • Sri Lanka.

These international students achieve stellar rates of immediate employment and are highly attractive to local employers. As demonstrated by yet-to-be-published research conducted for the Medical Deans of Australia, 45% of international students plan to remain in Australia when they commence their studies. By their final year, 78% accept intern places (virtually all those who are not scholarship students sponsored by their home governments).

Australia’s Graduate Destination Survey from 2009-2011 reveals their employment outcomes to be near identical to those achieved by domestic students (99.6% working full-time at four months compared with 99.7%). The source country was almost irrelevant, with 100% of Canadian, US, Malaysian, Indonesian, Taiwanese, Norwegian and Botswanan students fully employed, compared with 97% from Singapore and 89% from China.

International medical graduates

As affirmed by the OECD, Australia has developed extraordinary reliance on international medical graduates (IMGs), who gain their qualifications overseas.

 

By 2006, 45% of Australian residents holding medical qualifications were overseas-born, including an estimated 25% who were overseas-qualified. The United Kingdom/Ireland, China, India, North Africa/ Middle East, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, South Africa and the Philippines were major sources of migration.

This diversification of supply has proven extremely challenging for Australia. The 2006 census shows just 53% of IMGs secured medical employment in Australia in their first five years of residence (across all immigration categories).

Doctors from English-speaking background countries moved seamlessly into work, while Commonwealth-Asian doctors fared reasonably. Outcomes were poor, by contrast, for many birthplace groups. Just 6% of doctors from China found medical employment within five years, along with 23% from Vietnam and 31% from Eastern Europe.

 

Employment access is significantly better for IMGs selected through the 457 visa temporary sponsored pathway. From 2005-06 to 2010-11 17,910 doctors were sponsored as temporary 457 visa migrants to pre-arranged jobs, with a 99% immediate employment rate.

From 2004-05 to 2010-11, an additional 2,790 IMGs were admitted through the permanent General Skilled Migration category. But not all passed the Australian Medical Council examinations, which are a requirement for unconditional registration in Australia. From 1978 to 2010, 82% of candidates passed the MCQ (the standard theoretical examination), typically on their first or second attempt, along with 85% of clinical candidates. But overall AMC completion rates were just 43%, since many choose not to persist with the process.

Large numbers of IMGs face significant barriers to securing professional registration. By contrast, international medical students face no impediments: they’re of prime workforce age (far younger than IMGs) and have self-funded to meet Australian domestic requirements.

Medical students’ future

We know that large numbers of international medical students wish to migrate to Australia – and access to intern places is critical for them to secure permanent resident status.

If Australia fails to retain these graduates, other countries will. Singapore, for instance, actively recruits in Australia, in a context where the nation’s fertility rate is incredibly low. New Zealand annually registers over 1,200 IMGs per year, but two-thirds will have left within two years. So there is major interest in attracting Australian-trained graduates.

If Australia is serious about retaining international medical students in the future, it’s vital to provide access to intern training places. While the students’ long-term intentions are unknown, it’s clear they have great potential to address Australian workforce shortages in the future.

 

** Lesleyanne Hawthorne is Professor of International Health Workforce, at the Australian Health Workforce Institute, University of Melbourne

This article was first published by The Conversation. A reminder to www.mystudyinaustralia.com readers that TC articles are freely available for republishing under a creative commons licence.

August 25, 2012

 

USQ Bachelor of Commerce (Accounting) student Clare Anthony took advantage of the Tafe pathway by completing a diploma before beginning her degree.

AN initiative developed between the University of Southern Queensland and Tafe Queensland to encourage more students to take up tertiary education has returned promising results.

More than 740 students have already joined USQ after studying at Tafe’s throughout Australia.

It is a 121 percent increase in 2011 and early results indicate an even stronger result for 2012.

The Queensland Tertiary Education Network, established in 2011 is the second initiative of the university, designed to strengthen the connection between industry, the higher education sector and the vocational education and training sector.

QTEPNet project manager Di Paez said the increase in numbers indicated students were taking advantage of new seamless pathways into a university degree from Tafe programs.

“There have been a number of opportunities opened up for prospective students,” Ms Paez said.

“Many Tafe’s now offer dual awards with USQ with the benefit of being able to jointly market courses that give seamless transition into degree programs and expand on the number of articulation pathways that are already in place.”

Bachelor of Commerce (Accounting) student Clare Anthony took advantage of the Tafe pathway by completing a Diploma of Events Management at the Bremer Institute of Tafe before beginning her degree.

“On completion, I was able to gain direct entry into a USQ business degree without having to reapply and it took one year off my three year degree,” Ms Anthony said.

“I decided to take this route as I wasn’t certain my OP would make the cut off to go directly into university.

“This way I still only had to complete a three year program, but I have a diploma as well as my degree.

“The Tafe to uni option really suited my situation and worked for me. USQ were extremely supportive and I think it is one of the best pathways to university I know of.

“There is no time wasting and you receive the credit you deserve for the hard work you already put in. If I can do it, than anyone can.”

Now in her final year of study, Ms Anthony said she planned to work as an accountant and continue studying to become a Chartered Accountant.

Source: The Chronicle 23rd August 2012

April 4, 2012

 

A NEW website will let students compare universities on different criteria and the Government already is planning its expansion.

The  MyUniversity site launched in Canberra today gives information such as offered courses, student-to-staff ratios, fees, student satisfaction, and access to student services and campus facilities.

Tertiary Education Minister Chris Evans said the Government was already working on expanding and refining the information available to include employment outcomes and better data on student experiences.

The site soon will include more information about what potential employers are looking for.

Providing connections would ensure a broad education as well as training for the jobs emerging in the economy,” Senator Evans said.

 

“So they can get the full picture not only of the experience at university but also what that means for their employment prospects,” he said at a high school in Canberra.

Much of the information on the MyUniversity site has been available already but Senator Evans said a student had to be “very determined” to find it all.

Year 12 student Briana Duck said her first look at the website had been very helpful.

“It gives heaps of statistics and you can compare the information you want,” the Canberra student said.

“Where they are, how many students go and complete it (their course) and get jobs further on.”

Briana is hoping to study forensics and said the website let her find which universities offered the course, how long each degree took and how many students studied it.

Senator Evans said each university vetted information before it appeared on the site to ensure accuracy.

There had been some sensitivity, particularly about releasing staff-to-student ratios, but the minister said these were important issues to students.

“If students start making choices around those issues and that affects enrolments, I’m sure you’ll find universities responding,” he said.

Briana said it was something she would consider in choosing where to study.

“You want to know how much attention you’re going to get and how many places there are,” she said.

The website has been well received by universities and tertiary students, but both said there was more work to do.

Universities Australia, the sector’s peak body, said prospective students must be able to have confidence in the information’s accuracy.

“Getting it right is also essential for the reputation of universities operating in an increasingly competitive market brought on by the demand-driven enrolment system,” chief executive Belinda Robinson said.

“We don’t believe the MyUniversity website is there yet, particularly in relation to attrition rates, staff-student ratios, the entry score cut-off search function, course mapping and searchability.”

The National Union of Students said the right kind of information was being provided but more detail was needed.

“Students have a right to know whether they will be enrolling at a campus with a culture of student-run student life and student services,” president Donherra Walmsley said.

“We believe it is essential that this information be included in the next iteration of the MyUniversity website.”

Ultimately students would benefit because universities would no longer be able to hide behind their brand.

 

Source: AAP April 03, 2012

March 23, 2012

 

The international education sector is one of Australia’s largest export industries and is important to Australia in supporting bilateral ties with key partner countries, supporting employment in a broad range of occupations throughout the Australian economy, as well as delivering high-value skills to the economy.

In December 2010, the Australian Government appointed the Hon Michael Knight AO to conduct the first strategic review of the student visa program to help enhance the quality, integrity and competitiveness of the student visa program.

On 7 March 2011, Mr Knight released a discussion paper and encouraged interested parties to make a written submission to the review.
See: Student Visa Program Review Discussion Paper (212KB PDF file)

There were 200 submissions received and they are available on the department’s website.
See: Submissions Received by the Review Team

Report released

Mr Knight reported to the government on 30 June 2011 with 41 recommendations. On 22 September 2011, the Minister for Immigration and Citizenship, Chris Bowen MP, and Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills, Jobs and Workplace Relations, Senator Chris Evans, released Mr Knight’s report, Strategic Review of the Student Visa Program 2011.
See: Strategic Review of the Student Visa Program 2011 (1.7MB PDF file)

Government’s response

The government supports in principle all of Mr Knight’s recommendations, however some recommendations will be modified in places to enhance the performance of the Australian education sector and to better safeguard the integrity of the visa system.
See: Boost to International Education Sector in Response to Knight Review – Media release

The fact sheet on the Government Response to the Knight Review of the Student Visa Program is available on the department’s website.
See: Fact Sheet – Government Response to the Knight Review of the Student Visa Program ( 72KB PDF file)

All of Mr Knight’s recommendations are available, as well as the actual or planned implementation dates.
See: Knight Review of the Student Visa Program—Recommendations with Expected Implementation Date

Stage one implementation

Stage one implementation of the Knight Review changes commenced on 5 November 2011. The following fact sheet details these changes.
See:
Fact Sheet – Stage One Implementation of the Knight Review Changes to the Student Visa program ( 66KB PDF file)
Students to Benefit as Knight Review Changes Rolled Out – Media release

Stage two implementation

The majority of the stage two Knight Review changes commenced on 24 and 26 March 2012. This includes streamlined visa processing for certain university applicants from 24 March 2012. Other stage two Knight Review changes are proposed to commence later in 2012 and in early 2013.
See:
Fact Sheet – Stage Two Implementation of the Knight Review Changes to the Student Visa Program ( 68KB PDF file)
Changes to Boost International Education – Media Release

One of the recommendations agreed to by government is the introduction of new post-study work arrangements, which are planned to come into effect in 2013.

On 30 November 2011, the government announced plans to extend eligibility of the post-study work visa. In addition to university graduates, the new post-study work arrangements are to be extended to Bachelor, Masters by coursework, Masters by research and PhD degree graduates from other education providers accredited to offer degree level programs in Australia.

The government also announced that graduates must complete their qualifications as a result of meeting the Australian study requirement which requires at least two academic years’ study in Australia.
See:
Government Extends Support for International Education – Media Release
Australian Study Requirement

To address recommendation 24 of the Knight Review, the government has recently introduced a Bill into Parliament that proposes to cease the automatic cancellation of student visas. 
See: Improvements for Existing Student Visa Holders ( 76KB PDF file)

Discussion paper on the Review of the Student Visa Assessment Level Framework (Recommendation 32)

Comments on the discussion paper on the Review of the Student Visa Assessment Level Framework closed on 16 March 2012.
See: Discussion Paper on the Review of the Student Visa AL Framework (201KB PDF file)

Frequently asked questions

The following information package provides further detail on the Knight Review changes to the student visa program.
See:
The University Sector – Streamlined Processing ( 88KB PDF file)
Post-Study Work Arrangements ( 75KB PDF file)
Genuine Temporary Entrant Requirement ( 94KB PDF file)
Vocational Education and Training (VET), Schools and Non-Award Sectors ( 87KB PDF file)
English Language Intensive Courses for Overseas Students (ELICOS) Sector ( 76KB PDF file)
Higher Degree by Research (HDR) Sector ( 79KB PDF file)
More Flexible Work Conditions ( 68KB PDF file)
Improvements for Existing Student Visa Holders ( 76KB PDF file)
Visa Processing Improvements ( 75KB PDF file)
Education Visa Consultative Committee (EVCC) ( 49KB PDF file)
Review of Assessment Level Framework ( 62KB PDF file)

See also: 
Review of Assessment Level Framework – Terms of Reference ( 59KB PDF file)
List of External Reference Group Members – Revi
ew of Assessment Level Framework

 

March 23, 2012

 

The Minister for Immigration and Citizenship, Chris Bowen MP, today announced key changes to the student visa program recommended by the Knight Review will commence from 24 March, as part of the government’s commitment to position Australia as a preferred study destination for international students.

‘International education plays a vital role in a growing economy, educational outcomes and Australia’s diplomatic engagement with other countries, so it’s important that we give it the best possible support,’ Mr Bowen said.

‘From 24 March, we are implementing streamlined visa processing arrangements for prospective students enrolled in Bachelor, Masters or Doctoral degrees at participating universities, making the application process simpler and faster.’

In recognition of these institutions’ track record, university students — regardless of their country of origin — will be treated as though they are lower risk and will need to submit less evidence in support of their visa application, similar to the current assessment level (AL) 1.

‘Universities in Australia have embraced the opportunity to sign up to the arrangements, which are expected to help boost international enrolments for semester two 2012 and beyond,’ Mr Bowen said.

From 26 March, the government will provide more flexible work conditions for all student visa holders, which will also provide more flexibility for their employers.

In recognition of the importance of the higher degree by research sector, the government will also allow postgraduate research (subclass 574) visa holders to work an unlimited amount of hours per week once their course has commenced, which will mean they can engage in employment related to their research.

Other Knight Review changes to be implemented from 24 March include:

Improved access to English language study for schools sector visa applicants and for student guardian visa holders

Removal of the requirement for higher risk schools sector visa applicants to provide evidence of an English language proficiency test.

In line with the Knight Review recommendations, the minister today introduced legislation to Parliament to abolish the automatic visa cancellation process for international students.

The Student Legislation Amendment (Student Visas) Bill will reduce complexity and uncertainty for students and provide for fairer, more efficient monitoring and compliance processes.

 

Thursday, 22 March 2012

February 16, 2012

The changes are in response to the immigration department’s 2011 review of student visa assessment level settings.

INTERNATIONAL students will more easily be able to apply for visas following changes announced by Federal Immigration and Citizenship Minister, Chris Bowen.

The changes, welcomed by the higher education sector, mean the number of assessment levels across a range of student visa subclasses will be reduced, making the visa application process easier for students from 29 countries.

The changes, which will take effect from March 24, are in response to the immigration department’s 2011 review of student visa assessment level settings.

“While it was recommended that some assessment levels be increased, I have decided to only implement the reductions in order to best support Australia’s international education sector,” Mr Bowen said.

Mr Bowen said the changes would help around 10,500 prospective students.

“These changes will particularly benefit the postgraduate research sector, English Language Intensive Courses for Overseas Students and vocational education and training providers.”

For example, South Koreans studying VET and ELICOS courses and postgraduate research students from China, India and Indonesia will now find it easier to apply for visas, Mr Bowen said.

Universities Australia welcomed the changes to the student visa system as “a terrific outcome”.

“It really is a terrific outcome not just for the higher education sector but for the Australian economy more broadly because at a time we’re seeing manufacturing struggling, tourism struggling, both primarily because of the strong Australian dollar, it’s really important for those industries that are strong to be able to step up to offset some of those economic implications,” said Universities Australia chief executive, Belinda Robinson.

“The international education sector is Australia’s third largest export industry, and over the 2010-11 period international higher education students spent an average of $38,000 each in this country on goods, services and fees.

“And as well the stronger our international education industry is, the more affordable education is for Australian students.”

Meanwhile a new report released by ranking provider QS (Quacquarelli Symonds Limited) found Australian cities are among the most attractive study destinations in the world.

Using scores that take into account student mix, affordability, quality of living and employer activity, as well as their own QS World University Rankings, the company compiled a top fifty list of the ”best student cities”.

Ms Robinson said that according to QS, Australia had more cities than any other country in the world listed in the top 50, making it one of the world’s most favourable study environments.

If “affordability” was removed as a criterion, Melbourne and Sydney would be ranked at number 1 and 4 respectively.

“While it may be a little more expensive to live and study in Australia, the quality of living, employment opportunities, student mix and the quality of universities makes Australia a very appealing place for those seeking to study abroad,” Ms Robinson said.

Source: http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au 16 February 2012

February 15, 2012
February 15, 2012


1                     The Minister for Immigration and Citizenship, Chris Bowen MP, today announced the Government will make the visa application process easier for students from 29 countries by reducing assessment levels across a range of student visa subclasses from 24 March.

The changes are in response to the Department of Immigration and Citizenship’s (DIAC) 2011 review of student visa assessment level settings, which recommended that a number of assessment levels be changed. 

“While it was recommended that some assessment levels be increased, I have decided to only implement the reductions in order to best support Australia’s international education sector,” Mr Bowen said.

“Lowering the minimum evidentiary requirement for the grant of a student visa for selected countries and visa subclasses is expected to help around 10,500 prospective students.

“These changes will particularly benefit the postgraduate research sector, English Language Intensive Courses for Overseas Students (ELICOS) and vocational education and training (VET) providers.”

For example, South Koreans studying VET and ELICOS courses and postgraduate research students from China, India and Indonesia will now find it easier to apply for visas.

“The reduction in assessment levels builds on the measures implemented as a result of the Strategic Review of the Student Visa Program, undertaken by the Hon Michael Knight AO, to ensure Australia remains an attractive study option for overseas students,” Mr Bowen said. 

Assessment levels are an important tool in managing the student visa program, as they ensure the efficient delivery of services to a diverse range of students while supporting the integrity of Australia’s immigration program.

Assessment levels align visa requirements to the immigration risk posed by students from every country and in each education sector. They are regularly reviewed and amended to accurately reflect the risk posed by a student cohort.

Those countries and sectors that were recommended to be subject to an increase in assessment levels will be placed on notice and reviewed as part of any future reforms to the risk management framework. 

More information on the reductions to student visa assessment levels can be found at www.immi.gov.au/students/student-visa-assessment-levels.htm

2                     Reduction of Certain Student Visa Assessment Levels

Reductions in Student visa assessment levels for 29 countries for certain Student visa subclasses was announced by the Minister for Immigration and Citizenship on 15 February 2012. These reductions will take effect on 24 March 2012.

These changes will lower the minimum evidentiary requirements needed for the grant of a Student visa for certain countries and education sectors.

The following is a list of countries and Student visa subclasses affected by the assessment level decreases which will take effect on 24 March 2012.

Country of Citizenship

Education Sector

Updated Assessment Levels

Belize

Subclass 572 – VET

AL2

Bhutan

Subclass 574 – Post Grad Research

AL1

Botswana

Subclass 571 – Schools

AL1

Botswana

Subclass 575 – Non–Award

AL1

Bulgaria

Subclass 570 – ELICOS

AL1

Bulgaria

Subclass 572 – VET

AL1

Bulgaria

Subclass 573 – Higher Ed

AL1

Bulgaria

Subclass 575 – Non–Award

AL1

China, Peoples Republic of

Subclass 574 – Post Grad Research

AL1

Ecuador

Subclass 574 – Post Grad Research

AL1

Egypt

Subclass 574 – Post Grad Research

AL1

India

Subclass 574 – Post Grad Research

AL1

Indonesia

Subclass 571 – Schools

AL1

Indonesia

Subclass 574 – Post Grad Research

AL1

Jordan

Subclass 571 – Schools

AL2

Kazakhstan

Subclass 574 – Post Grad Research

AL1

Kazakhstan

Subclass 575 – Non–Award

AL2

Korea, South

Subclass 570 – ELICOS

AL1

Korea, South

Subclass 572 – VET

AL1

Latvia

Subclass 572 – VET

AL1

Lebanon

Subclass 571 – Schools

AL2

Lebanon

Subclass 574 – Post Grad Research

AL1

Lebanon

Subclass 575 – Non–Award

AL3

Maldives

Subclass 570 – ELICOS

AL2

Maldives

Subclass 571 – Schools

AL1

Maldives

Subclass 573 – Higher Ed

AL1

Mauritius

Subclass 571 – Schools

AL1

Mexico

Subclass 572 – VET

AL1

Montenegro, Republic of

Subclass 570 – ELICOS

AL2

Montenegro, Republic of

Subclass 57
2 – VET

AL2

Montenegro, Republic of

Subclass 573 – Higher Ed

AL2

Montenegro, Republic of

Subclass 575 – Non–Award

AL2

Namibia

Subclass 573 – Higher Ed

AL2

Nepal

Subclass 574 – Post Grad Research

AL1

Nicaragua

Subclass 570 – ELICOS

AL2

Nicaragua

Subclass 571 – Schools

AL2

Nicaragua

Subclass 572 – VET

AL2

Nicaragua

Subclass 575 – Non–Award

AL2

Philippines

Subclass 571 – Schools

AL1

Reunion

Subclass 572 – VET

AL1

Reunion

Subclass 573 – Higher Ed

AL1

Seychelles

Subclass 571 – Schools

AL1

Seychelles

Subclass 572 – VET

AL1

Seychelles

Subclass 575 – Non–Award

AL1

Suriname

Subclass 573 – Higher Ed

AL2

Suriname

Subclass 575 – Non–Award

AL2

Tanzania

Subclass 571 – Schools

AL2

Tanzania

Subclass 574 – Post Grad Research

AL1

Turkey

Subclass 571 – Schools

AL2

Turkey

Subclass 572 – VET

AL2

Ukraine

Subclass 570 – ELICOS

AL2

Ukraine

Subclass 571 – Schools

AL2

Ukraine

Subclass 573 – Higher Ed

AL2

Ukraine

Subclass 574 – Post Grad Research

AL1

Ukraine

Subclass 575 – Non–Award

AL2

Venezuela

Subclass 572 – VET

AL1

3                     Frequently asked Questions

4 Q: I am an international student studying in Australia. Do these changes affect me?

A: These changes will only affect new Student visa applications made on or after 24 March 2012.

5 Q: What does a reduction of assessment levels mean to Student visa applicants?

A: Students affected by the changes will be required to provide less documentary evidence to support their claims for the grant of a Student visa. These may include evidence of English language proficiency, financial capacity and academic qualifications.

6 Q: Where can I find out more information about assessment levels?

A: Further information on assessment levels including a full list of current assessment levels is available on the department’s website.
See: Student Visa Assessment Levels

 

November 9, 2011

Australia  will be able to accept test scores from the alternative English language tests for Student visa applications for all countries lodged on or after 5 November 2011. In addition to IELTS test, the  acceptable alternative tests are:

  • Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL),
  • The Pearson Test of English (PTE) Academic and
  • Academic and Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE) from Cambridge ESOL for Student visa purposes.

 

All arrangements relating to IELTS test scores remain unchanged.  The TOEFL iBT, Pearson and Cambridge tests are simply alternatives to the IELTS test for Student visa purposes.  Implementing these alternative tests means Student visa applicants who are required to provide evidence of their English language proficiency will be able to choose from a wider range of English language tests providers.

Paper and eVisa application forms for Student visa applications have been updated to allow you to provide details about which English language test you take, and the results you received.

You must also provide the department with evidence of the test score you received.  The type of evidence you provide will depend on which English language test you take.  Your score will be verified by the department with the test provider.

Applicant may be required to provide additional information to allow the department to verify your English language test score with the test provider.  Please refer to each English language test provider’s website to confirm whether you will also be provided with a unique identifying code.  If you are provided with this code, you will need to provide it to the department.  To avoid delays in processing your application, you should provide the department with evidence of your test score as soon as possible.

The alternative English language tests will apply to Student visa applications:

  • lodged but not decided by 5 November 2011
  • lodged on or after 5 November 2011.

The Migration Regulations 1994 state that an English language proficiency test score is valid for two years from the date of the test.  If an applicant takes an English language proficiency test from one of the alternative providers before 5 November 2011 and achieves the required score, then they will be able to meet the English language requirement for their Student visa application.

Test score equivalencies for the alternative tests are provided below:

 

IELTS SCORE Band

4.0

4.5

5.0

5.5

6.0

6.5

7.0

7.5

8.0

8.5

9.0

Test of English as a Foreign Language internet based Test  (TOEFL iBT)

31

32

35

46

60

79

94

102

110

115

118

 

PTE Academic

29

30

36

42

50

58

65

73

79

83

86

Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE) from Cambridge ESOL test scores

32

36

41

47

52

58

67

74

80

87

93

 

The alternative English language tests only apply to Student visa applications at this stage.  The department will be reviewing the alternative tests for use with other visa program after 12 months of operation.

October 13, 2011

 

Students at Australia’s universities will have access to better quality services and amenities when they return to campus next year, following the passage of the Higher Education Support Amendment (Student Services and Amenities) Bill.

Minister for Tertiary Education, Senator Chris Evans said the Bill signalled a long overdue boost for student services, and a big win for regional universities which have been among the strongest advocates for change.

“This legislation will assist universities in rebuilding vital student services and amenities to ensure that they can support their growing student populations,” Senator Evans said.

“From next year, countless campus services which were stripped of funding under the former Coalition Government will start to be rebuilt.

“Students will benefit from improved access to a range of campus services, including sporting and recreational activities, employment and career advice, child care, financial advice and food services.

“The Coalition’s neglect of student services hit regional campuses particularly hard, with many student facilities at regional campuses forced to close down.”

A key feature of the new arrangements is that students can benefit from better student services while they are at university but defer payment of the fee through the HECS system until they are earning a decent income.

“Students have a clear interest in how their fees are being spent. Universities will be required to consult with students on the specific uses of the proceeds from any services and amenities fees,” Senator Evans said.

Under the new legislation, higher education institutions can charge a fee of up to $263 per student in 2012. No student will be forced to join any student organisation and the Bill expressly prohibits fee revenue being used to support a political party.

The student services and amenities fee will provide universities with more than $250 million over four years for much needed student amenities and services.

October 3, 2011

 

Australia’s 39 universities are preparing for a brand new day in 2012: not only will government quotas on the number of local students they enrol be lifted, but they will also be able to recruit as many foreigners as they wish as a result of a new fast-track visa system.

In an unexpectedly generous move that surprised even sceptical vice-chancellors, the federal government decided to lift most restrictions on the issuing of student visas to overseas students applying for a university place, opening the way for a likely flood of new applications from China, India, Pakistan and other Asian countries.

Universities that agree to meet certain requirements regarding the students they admit will also have access to a new streamlined system that will speed up visa processing.

The government’s imposition of tighter visa rules two years ago was a reaction to dodgy college operators using vocational education courses as a front for their clients to obtain permanent residency visas. As tens of thousands of students enrolled in cooking and hairdressing courses in the hope of staying on after completion, a debate began to rage about Australia allowing relatively unskilled migrants with poor English into the country.

The stricter visa rules also applied to applicants seeking university places while, at the same time, the Australian dollar began rising sharply against the US dollar. These changes made obtaining a visa to study here harder and more expensive than in Canada or the US; and as the number of full-fee international students fell sharply, universities suddenly found a significant source of non-government income drying up.

In 2009, the estimated economic benefit to Australia of having nearly 500,000 fee-paying foreign students enrolled in schools, colleges and universities was AUD18 billion (US$18 billion); two years later this had fallen by AUD2 billion.

As vice-chancellor protests became louder, the government appointed a former New South Wales Labor government minister, Michael Knight, to review the situation.

In a 150-page report just released, Knight proposed a series of changes he claimed would boost the competitiveness of Australian universities in the global student marketplace. Although his 41 recommendations apply mostly to universities, the changes effectively give vice-chancellors almost total freedom to recruit as many foreign students as they want.

To the surprise of every higher education lobby group, the government accepted all the recommendations and promised to implement them before the start of second semester next year.

Among the changes expected to improve the attractiveness of Australian higher education is the scrapping of a rule requiring foreign students to prove they have enough money saved to allow them to study in the country for two years.

A student from China, by far Australia’s biggest source of international students, at present must have access to at least AUD100,000 to obtain a visa. From mid-2012, however, students will only need to declare they can afford to pay tuition and living costs. As well, those who graduate with at least a bachelor degree from a university will be able to stay on and work for up to four years and will not be tied to any particular occupation.

“All applicants will still be subject to basic requirements such as having health insurance and not being a security or health risk. And the Department of Immigration will reserve the right to look separately at applications from any group that poses a particular concern,” Knight says in his report.

“However, beyond those basic requirements, [the Department] will effectively take the university’s word that the student is suitable. Therefore universities can be confident their students will have their applications processed quickly.”

But Knight warns that “these substantial benefits” come with significant obligations: universities will be accountable for the visa outcomes of their students. If these outcomes are consistently poor, the university will be removed from the streamlined processing arrangements and prospective students will be processed under the existing rules.

Despite universities being subject to government “checks and balances and integrity measures” before gaining access to the new streamlined visa procedures, critics say the changes will open the doors to a new wave of foreign student workers who, after graduating, will compete with Australians for jobs and add to the thousands already seeking to stay on a permanent residents.

Monash University social scientist and demographer Dr Bob Birrell said past experience showed that thousands of students from poorer families who could not meet the costs of fees and living expenses were now likely to apply for university. Birrell, founder of Monash’s Centre for Population and Urban Research, said the result would be a significant influx of students seeking through a university education to gain access to the Australian labour market.

“We have had repeated examples of this in the past, starting with the English language college debacle of the late 1980s and more recently the vocational college debacle over cooks and hairdressers,” he said. “I’m amazed the Immigration Department has gone along with this because they know what happened in the past.”

Another critic, Peter Holden, said Knight’s decision to confine the changes to universities was against federal government policy, which wanted an integrated tertiary sector with a single regulatory body. “His old-school approach reinforces outdated stereotypes and elitist views of post-secondary education,” Holden said.

“Knight’s reasoning is that if things go off the rails it will be easier for the Department of Immigration to rein in universities because there are only 39 of them. This is not exactly a ringing endorsement of high quality and low risk. As Knight admits, universities are not perfect.”

Holden is director of international engagement for TAFE Directors Australia, the heads of the country’s public technical and further education colleges. Writing in The Australian newspaper’s higher education section, he said one in five students in Australia’s universities was from overseas – among the highest ratios in the world.

“For the whole public vocational education sector, including all qualification levels, the ratio is less than one in 27. In terms of stability, TAFE institutes are equally well-managed with high levels of accountability and transparency.

“The Knight review perpetuates the flawed impression the problem lies within the vocational education and training sector, as though it can be treated as one amorphous whole.”

Source: Geoff Maslen / 02 October 2011 / Issue: 191  /university world news

 

September 29, 2011

 

September 2011

International Education Agency-Australia, one of the largest education agent of Australia has welcomed the Government’s response to the Knight review into the student visa program, in particular steps to remove barriers for genuine higher education students to study in Australia.

The Australian federal government commissioned the Knight Review into the student visa program in Dec 2010 to investigate ways to make Australia more competitive whilst maintaining the integrity of the migration system and the quality of its education system.

This followed a steady downturn of international students choosing to study in Australia after changes to visa and migration policy in early 2010.

In June Michael Knight handed his report to the Government and on 22 September the Government, Senator Evans, Minister for Education, and Minister Bowen, Minister for Immigration and Citizenship, released the report with the statement that they were accepting all 41 of Knight’s recommendations.

A number of significant changes are outlined below.

Changes to student visa eligibility and processing:

  • That all higher education students applying to study a bachelor degree or higher at a university or a packaged course, regardless of country of origin, will be treated as a student from an AL1 country. This means a change to a declaration of proof of funds and in many countries the ability to apply via the eVisa system which should significantly reduce the time taken to secure a student visa. English language courses and other preparatory course will also be included in this streamlined process.
  • Allowing English language students to apply for a visa without first meeting minimum English language skills requirements; and
  • The policy of Pre¬Visa Assessment will be discontinued.
  • That student visas be allowed to be granted in advance of four months before the commencement of the relevant course. Where necessary visas should specify a date before which the holder cannot enter Australia.

Changes to student work rights:

  • An enhanced post study work visa regime for international university graduates, particularly withdrawing skills assessment and the requirement to work in any particular occupation.
  • In addition the term of the post study work visa will increase from 18 to 24 months for undergraduates degrees, up to three years for Masters and four years for PhD.
  • That student work entitlements be measured as 40 hours per fortnight instead of 20 hours per week

Changes to be made regarding Agents:

  • That the necessary legislative changes be made to require the name of any agent involved to be entered into the student’s data into PRISMS.
  • That DEEWR take steps to encourage providers to voluntarily enter agent data into PRISMS in the interim before the ESOS Act is changed to make this mandatory.
  • That DIAC upgrade its liaison at overseas posts with migration and education agents in relation to the student visa program, including regular meetings to keep agents abreast of any changes in rules and procedures.

Changes to visa compliance and enforcement:

  • The mandatory cancellation requirement for unsatisfactory attendance, unsatisfactory progress and working in excess of the hours allowed should be removed, giving DIAC officers the discretion to determine cancellation in particular cases on their merits.
  • DIAC should concentrate its compliance and integrity resources in relation to student visas on the highest risk areas.
  • Automatic cancellation of student visas should be abolished and replaced by a system in which information conveyed by SCVs is used as an input into a more targeted and strategic analysis of non‐compliance.

The full list of 41 recommendations has been provided below.

One of the most significant changes is that the onus on judging student visa eligibility has been passed to universities and their partners, who will need to ensure that standards are maintained otherwise the Department of Immigration and Citizenship (DIAC) reserves the right to strip institutions of their ability to streamline visa processing.

Other education providers such as Vocation Education institutions have not yet been granted the ability to streamline their visa processing like the universities but the government has highlighted plans to widen this option based on a provider risk assessment.

In accepting Knight’s recommendations the Australian government has also indicated that it plans to review the current Assessment Level system and take further steps to improve the current risk management framework.

The implementation timeframe for many of these changes is not yet established but the government has committed to having most changes operational by the commencement of the second semester in 2012.

 

Recommendations

Recommendation 1

That a new element be introduced into the eligibility criteria for a student visa. That new criterion will be to assess whether the applicant is a genuine temporary entrant. This new criterion should be the first to be considered in assessing any application for a student visa.

Recommendation 2

A successful applicant must be both a genuine temporary entrant and a genuine student.

Recommendation 3 – streamlined visa processing for universities

3.1 That all students in the categories set out below, irrespective of their country of origin

– but subject to the provisions in 3.5, 3.6 and 3.7 should be treated as though they are all AL1.

 

3.2 This treatment should apply to the following university student applicants:

  • Bachelor Degree;
  • 2 plus 2 (or 3 plus 1) arrangements with partner universities;
  • Masters Degree by Coursework.

3.3 The special treatment should not apply to:

  • short courses;
  • Associate Degree;
  • Graduate diploma;
  • Graduate certificate;
  • Diploma and Advanced Diploma;
  • non‐award courses (except as provided for in Recommendation 18);
  • the non‐university courses at the six universities which are dual sector (VET and university).

3.4 The benefits should also apply to courses which are explicitly packaged with an eligible university course at the time when the offer of university enrolment is made. This might include English language (ELICOS) and/or foundation or pathway courses in circumstances where non compliance by the student at any part of the package would be regarded as non‐compliance with the university enrolment.

3.5 The government should continue to require appropriate health checks, health insurance, character (predominantly criminal record/connections) and security checks.

3.6 The underlying DIAC powers in regard to every individual student application should continue to exist.

3.7 The government should also reserve the right to exclude certain high risk groups from the streamlined approach for university applicants. For example, the government might want to carefully assess all applicants from a persecuted minority group in a particular country. Applicants from such a group might have a huge incentive to apply for protection visas as soon as they reach Australia. The Australian Government may or may not wish to take such people on humanitarian grounds but that should be a separate decision and should not get mixed up with the process of granting visas for university students.

Recommendation 4 Post Study Work Rights

4.1 All graduates of an Australian university Bachelor degree, who have spent at least two academic years studying that degree in Australia, and who have complied with their visa conditions, should receive two years work rights.

4.2 All graduates of an Australian university Mast
ers by Coursework degree, who have studied that degree in Australia, and who have complied with their visa conditions, should receive two years work rights on successful completion of their course.

4.3 This should apply irrespective of the nature of the course (for example whether it be Arts or Engineering) and not be tied to working in any particular occupation.

4.4 The mechanism for taking up these work rights should be administratively very simple with the following components:

  • the university must notify that the course has been successfully completed. (This will be earlier than the formal graduation which could be many months after the course has been completed);
  • DIAC should not undertake any detailed, time consuming, assessment of the applicant;
  • the scheme must be one which can be marketed by the universities to prospective students as almost guaranteeing post study work rights.

Recommendation 5

That all Higher Degree by Research (HDR) students – visa subclass 574 ‐be treated as though they are all AL1 applicants.

Recommendation 6

That where any English language or other preparatory course is required by the Higher Degree by Research provider then the whole package still be treated as AL1.

Recommendation 7

That all Higher Degree by Research students be given unlimited work rights.

Recommendation 8

Masters by Research graduates should receive three years post‐study work rights and PhD graduates four years.

Recommendation 9

That the visa arrangements for Higher Degree by Research students be such that an extension for up to six months after submission of their thesis is available if needed during the interactive marking process.

Recommendation 10

That, provided the integrity measures relating to the revised criteria for a student visa are implemented (as set out in Recommendation 1), the threshold English language test requirements for stand alone ELICOS students be removed.

Recommendation 11

That the English language requirements for school students in AL4 be the same as those applying for AL1 through to AL3 and the associated waiver scheme abolished.

Recommendation 12

That the maximum period of time a school student visa holder can study English be 50 weeks across all ALs.

Recommendation 13

That the current restrictions on student guardians of a maximum of three months of study be maintained but unlimited part‐time study rights for ELICOS study only be allowed.

Recommendation 14

That pre‐paid homestay fees be included in financial assessments on the same basis as pre‐paid boarding fees.

Recommendation 15

That as a matter of some urgency AusAID, DIAC, DOHA and other relevant Australian government agencies develop an integrated policy in relation to the award of scholarships and how visa arrangements for awardees are to be managed. In particular they should address the situation of potential awardees who have a disability or HIV.

Recommendation 16

That PhD students entering under the subclass 576 visa have access to the same extension provisions recommended for Higher Degree by Research students in Recommendation 9, provided AusAID is prepared to fund their extended period.

Recommendation 17

That DIAC and DEEWR meet with State education authorities to work out what can be done to avoid the situation where a visa for a child dependent cannot be granted until proof of enrolment is present and state education authorities will not grant such proof until proof of visa grant is made. Any agreed remedy should apply across all student visa subclasses.

Recommendation 18

That students coming for semester or year¬long non‐award courses at an Australian university as part of their home universities degree and/or as part of an agreed student exchange between universities be given access to streamlined processing as outlined in Recommendation 3.

Recommendation 19

That DIAC undertake specific research targeted at integrity and compliance issues into student visa outcomes, including both primary and secondary applicants, to inform policy development.

Recommendation 20

That DIAC be appropriately funded to further develop research capability across the program.

Recommendation 21

That DIAC, to the extent permitted by legislation, co‐operate with its counterparts across all levels of government to facilitate information sharing, to inform evidence based decision making.

Recommendation 22

In the event that the research over the next 12 months reveals systemic abuse of dependant (secondary applicant) visas, that the government seriously consider mirroring the recent UK policy and restrict dependant visas to Masters and above courses unless the primary applicant is sponsored by a government.

Recommendation 23

Current arrangements whereby SCVs automatically become NCNs should cease. SCV information should continue to be conveyed to DIAC who should use it as an input into a more targeted and strategic analysis of non‐compliance.

Recommendation 24

Automatic cancellation of student visas should be abolished and replaced by a system in which information conveyed by SCVs is used as an input into a more targeted and strategic analysis of non‐compliance.

Recommendation 25

The mandatory cancellation requirement for unsatisfactory attendance, unsatisfactory progress and working in excess of the hours allowed should be removed, giving DIAC officers the discretion to determine cancellation in particular cases on their merits.

 

Recommendation 26

DIAC should concentrate its compliance and integrity resources in relation to student visas on the highest risk areas.

Recommendation 27

DIAC should not only respond to information generated by PRISMS but also be proactive in detecting the sorts of breaches (for example sham marriages and exceeding permissible work hours) which are not reported in PRISMS.

Recommendation 28

That student work entitlements be measured as 40 hours per fortnight instead of 20 hours per week

Recommendation 29

That the necessary legislative changes be made to require the name of any agent involved to be entered into the student’s data into PRISMS.

Recommendation 30

That DEEWR take steps to encourage providers to voluntarily enter agent data into PRISMS in the interim before the ESOS Act is changed to make this mandatory.

Recommendation 31

That DEEWR and DIAC establish a single student identifier to track international students through their studies in Australia.

Recommendation 32

That DIAC undertake a review of the AL framework, with a mind to either abolishing the system entirely or modifying the framework to make it relevant to current and future challenges facing the student visa program. This review should be managed by DIAC but should include reference to an external panel or reference group.

Recommendation 33

That DIAC upgrade its liaison at overseas posts with migration and education agents in relation to the student visa program, including regular meetings to keep agents abreast of any changes in rules and procedures.

Recommendation 34

That Austrade be asked to prepare a more detailed outlook document that provides effective business planning intelligence demonstrating the opportunities, for offshore provision of vo
cational education.

Recommendation 35

That the highest quality Australian VET providers including TAFEs, be encouraged to explore offshore market opportunities.

Recommendation 36

That the Australian Government, through programs such as the Export Market Development Grants Scheme and other forms of assistance, support high quality Australian vocational education providers in expanding their offshore training services.

Recommendation 37

That DIAC constitute an Education Visa Advisory Group as a primary means of regular two way communication between stakeholders in the international education sector and DIAC.

Recommendation 38

That the policy regarding Pre‐Visa Assessment (PVA) be discontinued.

Recommendation 39

That student visas be allowed to be granted in advance of four months before the commencement of the relevant course. Where necessary visas should specify a date before which the holder cannot enter Australia.

Recommendation 40

That DIAC regularly reviews the current living cost amount, and based on the CPI or other measure amend the amount, as required.

Recommendation 41

That DIAC review the exclusion criteria and policy which relate to student visa non‐compliance.

 

September 28, 2011

 

 

OVERSEAS AID: Visa rules and red tape is being eased to help more foreign students come to Australian universities.

AUSTRALIAN universities will be more attractive to overseas students under new visa rules to be adopted in time for the second semester of 2012, the government says.

The federal government announced on Thursday it will streamline visa processing for students enrolling in Australian universities.

Financial requirements for student visas will be eased, so applicants will need about $36,000 less in their bank account than they do now.

And new post-study work visas will allow students to remain in Australia for two to four years after their course ends, depending on their level of qualification.

But the student visa criteria will be tightened slightly so applicants will have to prove they are genuine students and genuine about returning home.

The changes follow a review of the student visa program led by former NSW government minister Michael Knight and the government has accepted all 41 of his recommendations.

“It’s not enough to be genuine about your studies and have no intention of going home, nor is it enough to be genuine about going home but not serious about your studies,” Mr Knight said.

Tertiary Education Minister Chris Evans said the changes would help Australian universities be more competitive in the international market.

“They have articulated for a long time that the visa processes are a barrier to attracting students in an increasingly competitive environment,” he told reporters.

Contrary to perceptions, international student numbers across the education sector had continued to grow in the past year, though providers expected 2012 to be tough.

That was partly because of the old visa system and factors such as the high Australian dollar.

But Senator Evans said the sector’s previous growth rate was unsustainable and could not continue.

“I think we had some of those problems with student welfare because the system had just grown too quickly,” he said.

“This will help put this sector on a very good footing to continue to grow.”

Australian institutions could now compete on the basis of their education offerings and not be hindered by any visa requirements.

Mr Knight said it was important to strike a balance between the economic benefits brought by international students and protecting the integrity of migration controls.

From: AAP September 23, 2011 12:00AM

September 28, 2011
September 28, 2011

 

UNIVERSITIES will be allowed to entice foreign students with quick visa approvals and the right to two years of work after graduation as part of a reform package to stem further losses of overseas student income.

 

Immigration Minister Chris Bowen and Tertiary Education Minister Chris Evans said yesterday they would act on a remarkably frank report on Australia’s education export industry by former NSW politician Michael Knight.

 

By mid next year, foreign students keen on an Australian university degree will have access to a new, fast-track visa system.

 

Students from supposedly high-risk countries, such as China, no longer will have to show $75,000-plus in a bank account to prove they can cover fees and living costs.

 

Regardless of where they are from, would-be students will simply have to make a declaration they can support themselves.

 

Onerous financial requirements have been bitterly criticised as an over-reaction to past failings when migration was the motor of education, especially in private colleges.

 

Under yesterday’s Knight reforms, which single out universities for special treatment, foreign graduates emerging with a bachelor’s degree will be entitled to two years of work with no restriction on the type of job.

 

But if they want to stay for good they still have to satisfy stricter rules for skilled migration, which are much less generous to on-shore foreign students with low value skills.

 

University leaders yesterday welcomed the liferaft thrown them by the government.

 

“The reforms announced are more positive than anyone we spoke to expected [and] they come when competitors are kicking own goals _ riots in the UK and US funding cuts,” said University of NSW vice-chancellor Fred Hilmer.

 

“We expect a moderate lift in 2012 and a significant lift in 2013.”

 

In New Delhi yesterday, Professor Hilmer said education agents had told him that a streamlined student visa system was “the key to restoring our competitive position”.

 

Violence against students and tighter rules for skilled migration drove Indian students away while the US and Canada were making inroads on the China market.

 

In 2010-11, Australia’s education export earnings fell by almost 10 per cent from their $18 billion peak. Sharp declines in numbers at English language colleges and tertiary preparation courses suggest that universities are heading into tough trading conditions next year.

 

The education export industry complains of “a perfect storm” _ meaning rapid and unsettling changes in visa rules and skilled migration policy, the strong dollar and more competition for students overseas, and lingering reputational damage done by attacks on Indian students.

 

Under the Knight reforms, broadly adopted by the government, students wanting to study for a bachelor’s or higher qualification at university will find it easier and quicker to get a visa, regardless what country they are from.

 

“Unfortunately the worst perceptions about visa processing times are in Australia’s biggest market, China,” Mr Knight said.

 

From next autumn, would-be university students would benefit from an end to the requirement that they show large amounts of money upfront as evidence of capacity to pay.

 

Also promised next year is a comprehensive review of the so-called risk assessment levels that immigration officials use to vet would-be students. This system makes it harder for students from China and India, for example, to get visas.

 

Mr Knight recommended a new work rights regime for foreign students who graduate from an Australian university.

 

He said this had to be “administratively very simple”.

 

“The scheme must be one which can be marketed by the universities to prospective students as almost guaranteeing post-study work rights,” he said.

 

Glenn Withers, chief executive of Universities Australia, said the work entitlement was “one of the biggest breakthroughs”.

 

“This [work right] is as good or better than the Canadian or the US provisions,” he said.

 

But Monash University researcher Bob Birrell said the labour market implications had not been thought through.

 

Locals already were competing with thousands of former overseas students who were on bridging visas following a reform of the skilled migration rules, he said.

 

Stephen Connelly, from the International Education Association Australia, welcomed the Knight reforms.

 

He praised the extension of the new streamlined visa rules to packages including university study with foundation programs or English language courses.

 

“Australia has world’s best practice in pathways and preparatory programs for university studies, and this aspect of the recommendations will help cement our competitive advantage in this area,” Mr Connelly said.

 

He urged rapid implementation of the reform package to try to reverse the downward trend in on-shore student numbers.

 

Mr Knight justified special measures to boost overseas student recruitment by universities, rather than by TAFEs or private colleges, on the basis that universities were of “universally high” quality.

 

He also cited the “huge financial stake” of taxpayers in a university sector that had become heavily dependent on fees paid by foreign students.

 

He expressed surprise at the degree of dependence, pointing out that in 2009, about 25 per cent of students at the elite group of eight universities were internationals.

 

Andrew Norton, higher education expert at the Grattan Institute, was troubled by the favouritism shown to universities.

 

“My concern is that this is a big blow to the private higher education sector and the TAFES … and that this will distort the market further,” he said.

 

He said public universities already enjoyed a privileged position in the demand-driven system starting next year.

 

Adrian McComb, from the Council of Private Higher Education, said the “university centric nature” of the Knight report was disappointing.

 

He said this ran counter to the unified system of regulation for higher education, public and private, under the Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency.

 

Mr Knight said universities were “not perfect”.

 

He put universities on notice that they would be held accountable for systematic migration abuses by their students or for lower standards.

 

“The financial dependence which universities now have on the fees from international students could create pressure to soften entry standards and assessment standards,” he said.

 

He said his freeing up of student visas would be “quite dangerous” unless immigration officers put new effort into checking that applicants were genuine temporary visitors as well as genuine students.

 

However, Dr Birrell said the guidelines for this new student visa test were “so opaque that it’s almost impossible to apply. I cannot see how [an immigration] officer could possibly implement them.”

 

BY: BERNARD LANE From: The Australian September 23, 2011 12:00AM

August 19, 2011
August 19, 2011

 

Many international students rely on part-time work while they study. It might pay for your cost of living abroad and all those travel adventures, or you may want to send some money home to your family.

But how do you find the right part-time job as an international student? Read our guide to part-time work abroad, and find out!

Jobs for students

What kind of job can I do?

 

This will come down to your student visa and your language ability, rather than your course and skills. So check your visa restrictions first. If you are on a standard student visa to Australia or New Zealand, you can usually work up to 20 hours per week during term time and full-time during the holidays. If you are studying an postgraduate course and married or have a partner, you partner can work full time otherwise similar to you.

 

In the USA you are restricted to on-campus work for up to 20 hours per week. This could mean working in the college administration office, cafeteria, shops, or within a faculty.

 

You may be studying a PhD, but you most probably won’t be able to get part-time work in your chosen field. That’s fine – no matter what you end up doing, it will add to your CV experience and understanding of the workplace culture abroad.

 

International students are often found working as…

 

  • Waiters and bar staff
  • Retail staff
  • Warehouse staff
  • Call centre phone operators
  • Data entry staff
  • Security Officer
  • Car Park staff
  • Language teachers

 

These are all jobs that offer flexible part-time shifts, so you can take on more work as time and coursework allows. Make sure you feel confident in your local language ability before applying for a job that requires you to talk a lot on the phone or face to face – such as a market researcher!

 

How do I find a job?

 

You won’t be able to start looking until you’ve arrived and settled in – most employers will want to meet you in person.

 

Start with your university’s job centre or employment office. As well as current listings of local jobs, they can help you write your CV and job application,  prepare for an interview, and be ready for differences in work practices.

 

You can also look online at career websites, such as www.seek.com.au , www.careerone.com.au in Australia.

 

Some countries have government-run job centres as well. Local newspapers are also a great source of convenient part-time work.

 

How much will I be paid?

 

Make sure you understand exactly what your terms of work are before you start. Most countries have a minimum wage that all employers must stick to, even if you’re a casual part-time shift worker. In the Australia this is currently  A$14.31 per hour and in the US it’s US$7.25.

 

You may be paid weekly, fortnightly or monthly, and usually as a direct deposit into your bank account. You will pay tax out of your salary, and you should register for a local tax number (called a a Tax File Number in Australia) as soon as you are offered a job. You may be eligible for a tax return when you leave after your studies.

 

What about voluntary work?

 

Even though you might not be paid, it’s still worth taking on voluntary work for a non-profit organisation, or a short-term work experience placement. You will learn valuable work skills. Just check that it’s not a job that a local citizen would be paid to do – don’t take the risk of being exploited.

 

But how will I fit it all in?

 

It’s important to think about your course workload before you take on part-time work. If you have a lot of contact hours and a heavy commitment to group work, you may not want to take on work that will cause you extra stress.

 

But some jobs can add an entirely new dimension to your student life. You’ll meet new friends, learn new skills and discover your own hidden talents. It could be the highlight of your study abroad experience.

July 8, 2010

 

 

From 1 July 2010 DIAC require overseas students to obtain OSHC for the proposed duration of their Student visa.

Where a student will be studying at more than one education provider, the requirement remains that the student must maintain health insurance for the duration of their visa. There cannot be a gap in the OSHC coverage.

If a student has already obtained OSHC for a 12 month period before 1 July they will not be asked to obtain further insurance. They will be expected to renew their policy when it expires.

Overseas Student Health Cover (OSHC) is intended to assist international students to meet the costs of medical and hospital care that they may need while in Australia.

A student visa can be granted up to the maximum duration outlined below:

Visa duration is 10 months or less – The visa will usually be granted up to one month longer than the duration of the course.

Visa duration is longer than 10 Months – The visa will usually be granted up to two months longer that the duration of the course.

Visa duration is longer than 10 Months and finishing at the end of the Australian academic year (October – December) – The visa will usually be granted up to March 15 of the following year.

For all students submitting applications from July onwards, we will calculate the visa length and issue a statement of fees which reflects an OSHC amount as per the information above.

The start date for the OSHC will be from the course commencement date

To assist students who are now preparing to make fees payment and request their CoE’s it is advised that you contact the relevant Education Counsellor to obtain a revised statement showing the correct OSHC fees. Please ensure that this is requested prior to the student preparing their fees payment through TT or Bank Draft.

In the case where payment is received without the additional OSHC amount, the outstanding fees will be required prior to the CoE being issued

IEAA help students to get their OSHC free of any additional service charge . Should you have any question, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Additional information can be found attached or at http://www.immi.gov.au/students/_pdf/oshc-faq.pdf

 

June 4, 2010

The Sydney Business School (SBS) of the Wollongong University will be touring Asia

 

 

The Sydney Business School (SBS) of the Wollongong University will be touring Asia, Latin America and Europe again this year as part of the QS Annual MBA Tour.

In July, SBS will be exhibiting in the following locations:

Location                       Date                      Time                     Venue

New Delhi                    10 July 2010         2-6.00pm              Hyatt Regency

Mumbai                        12 July 2010         5-9.00pm              Taj Lands End

Shanghai                      15 July 2010         5-9.00pm              The Longemont Hotel

Beijing                          17 July 2010         2-6.00pm              The Kerry Centre Hotel

 

Further information about the fairs can be found at www.topmba.com/mba-tour .

Please keep this in mind when approached by a student with an interest in SBS, as we would welcome their visit to our stand.

 


Student Testimonials

 

Abraham Nyilika

Geologist, BHP Billiton

Graduated 2009 – Master of Project Management

“My study at SBS has enriched my life, not only in terms of the knowledge I gained from my study but also from the contacts and friendships established with classmates from so many countries. The program has enhanced my planning and scheduling skills. These skills have not only become a key component of my role within BHP, but have allowed me to add real and practical value to the group.”

 

 

Peter Buckley

Operations Manager, Thomas & Coffey

Completing a Master of Business Administration

“The Sydney Business School was an obvious choice in my selection for a business school to complete a Master of Business Administration; for the quality of academic staff, international recognition of degree, flexibility of study and camaraderie among the MBA cohort.”

October 30, 2009
October 30, 2009
  1. Monash University

Monash University

Motto

Ancora imparo (“I am still learning”)

Established

1958

Type

Public

Endowment

$1.178 billion

Chancellor

Dr Alan Finkel AM

Vice-Chancellor

Professor Edward Byrne,AO[1]

Faculty

6,000 [2]

Undergraduates

39,000

Postgraduates

16,000

Location

ClaytonVictoria, Australia

Campus

Urban

Affiliations

Group of EightASAIHL

Website

www.monash.edu.au/

A panorama view of Robert Menzies Building in Clayton Campus

Robert Menzies Building at the Clayton Campus

Monash University is a public university based in Melbourne, Australia. It is Australia’s largest university with about 55,000 students.

The University has a total of eight campuses: six in Victoria, Australia (ClaytonCaulfieldBerwickPeninsula,Parkville and Gippsland), one in Malaysia and one in South Africa.[3] The University also has a research and teaching centre in PratoItaly[4] and a graduate research school in MumbaiIndia.[5]

Monash University is a member of the prestigious “Group of Eight“, a group composed of some of the most research-intensive universities in Australia. It was recently ranked by The Times Higher Education-QS World University Rankings at number 45 of the world’s top 200 universities for 2009. It is one of only three post World War II universities in the world’s top 50.[6] With 11 universities in Victoria,[7] Monash attracts 33% of the top 5% of students from Victorian schools.[8][9] It has the largest number of first and total preferences from school leavers in Victoria seeking university places.[10]

Monash is home to a range of major research facilities, including the Australian Synchrotron, the Monash Science Technology Research and Innovation Precinct (STRIP), the Australian Stem Cell Centre, 100 research centres[11] and 17 co-operative research centres.

The university is named after the prominent Australian general Sir John Monash. One of his most well known statements is inscribed along a walkway between the Robert Blackwood Hall and Performing Arts Centre at the Clayton campus: Adopt as your fundamental creed that you will equip yourself for life, not solely for your own benefit, but for the benefit of the whole community.

The University’s motto is Ancora imparo (Italian), meaning ‘I am still learning’,[12] a saying attributed toMichelangelo.

  1. History

Main article: History of Monash University

One of the lakes at the University’s foundation campus, Clayton

  1. 4 Early history

Monash University is a commissioned Victorian university. It was established by an Act of the State Parliament of Victoria in 1958 as a result of the Murray Report which was commissioned in 1957 by the then Prime Minister Sir Robert Menzies to establish the second university in the state of Victoria. The university was named after the prominent Australian general Sir John Monash. This was the first time in Australia that a university had been named after a person, rather than a city or state.[13]

The original campus was in the south-eastern Melbourne suburb of Clayton (falling in what is now the City of Monash). The first University Council, led by Monash’s first Chancellor Sir Robert Blackwood, selected SirLouis Matheson, to be the first Vice-Chancellor of Monash University, a position he held until 1976. The University was granted an expansive site of 100 hectares of open land in Clayton.[14]

From its first intake of 347 students at Clayton on 13 March 1961, the university grew rapidly in size and student numbers so that by 1967, it had enrolled more than 21,000 students since its establishment.[citation needed] In its early years, it offered undergraduate and postgraduate degrees in engineering, medicine, science, arts, economics and politics, education and law. It was a major provider for international student places under the Colombo Plan, which saw the first Asian students enter the Australian education system.

In its early years of teaching, research and administration, Monash had the advantage of no entrenched traditional practices. This enabled it to adopt modern approaches without resistance from those who preferred the status quo. A modern administrative structure was set up, Australia’s first research centres and scholarships devoted to Indigenous Australians were established, and, thanks to Monash’s entirely new facilities, students in wheelchairs were able to enroll.[citation needed]

  1. 5 1970s onwards

From the mid-1960s to the early 1970s, Monash became the centre of student radicalism in Australia.[15][16] It was the site of many mass student demonstrations, particularly concerning Australia’s role in Vietnam War and conscription.[17] By the late 1960s, several student organisations, some of which were influenced by or supporters of communism, turned their focus to Vietnam, with numerous blockades and sit-ins.[18]

In the late 1970s and 1980s, Monash’s most publicised research came through its pioneering of in-vitro fertilisation (IVF). Led by Professors Carl Wood andAlan Trounson, the Monash IVF Program achieved the world’s first clinical IVF pregnancy in 1973.[19] In 1980, they delivered the first IVF baby in Australia.[20] This eventually became a massive source of revenue for the University at a time when university funding in Australia was beginning to slow down.

In the late 1980s, the Dawkins Reforms changed the landscape of higher education in Australia. Under the leadership of Vice-Chancellor Mal Logan, Monash transformed dramatically. In 1988, Monash University had only one campus, Clayton, with around 15, 000 students.[21] Just over a decade later, it had 8 campuses (including 2 overseas), a European research and teaching centre, and more than 50,000 stude
nts, making it the largest and most internationalised Australian university.[22]

  1. 6 Expansion in the 1990s

The expansion began in 1990, with a series of mergers between Monash, the Chisholm Institute of Technology, the Gippsland Institute of Advanced Education. In 1991 a merger with the Victorian College of Pharmacy created a new faculty of the University. Monash University’s expansion continued in 1994, with the establishment of the Berwick campus.

In 1998, the University opened the Malaysia campus, its first overseas campus and the first foreign university in Malaysia. In 2001, Monash South Africa opened its doors in Johannesburg, making Monash the first foreign university in South Africa. The same year, the University secured an 18th Century Tuscan Palace to open a research and teaching centre in Prato, Italy.

At the same time, Australian universities faced unprecedented demand for international student places, which Monash met on a larger scale than most, to the point that today around 30% of its students are from outside Australia.[23] Today, Monash students come from over 100 different countries, and speak over 90 different languages. The increase in international students, combined with its expansion, meant that Monash’s income skyrocketed throughout the 1990s, and it is now one of Australia’s top 200 exporters.[24]

  1. 7 2000 onwards

In recent years, the University has been prominent in medical research. A highlight of this came in 2000, when Professor Alan Trounson led the team of scientists which first announced to the world that nerve stem cells could be derived from embryonic stem cells, a discovery which led to a dramatic increase in interest in the potential of stem cells.[25][26] It has also led to Monash being ranked in the top 20 universities in the world for biomedicine.[27]

On October 21, 2002 Huan Yun “Allen” Xiang shot two people dead and injured five others on the Clayton campus.

For more details on this topic, see Monash University shooting.

On 30 May 2008, Monash University celebrated its 50th Anniversary.

The current Vice-Chancellor and President of Monash University is Professor Edward Byrne AO (since July 2009).

  1. Campuses
  2. 9 Clayton campus

Howitt Hall at the Clayton campus in Victoria, Australia

The Clayton campus covers an area over 1.1 km² and is the largest of the Monash campuses. Clayton is the flagship campus for Monash, demanding higher ENTER scores than all the other campuses, with the exception of Parkville. Clayton is home to the faculties of Arts, Business & Economics, Education, Engineering, IT, Law, Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences and Science. The Clayton campus has its own suburb and postcode (3800).

In 2001, the State Government of Victoria decided to build the first Australian synchrotron adjoining the campus. The Australian Synchrotron opened in July 2007 and creates beam light to make it capable to view matter at the molecular level. Monash University contributed $5M towards the $220M cost of the synchrotron as a member of the funding partnership for the initial suite of beamlines.[28]

The campus is also home to a number of halls of residence, colleges and other on-campus accommodation that house several thousand students. Six halls of residence are located at theClayton campus in Clayton, Victoria. There is an additional private residential college affiliated with the University.

  • Howitt Hall is the tallest Monash residential building, standing 12 stories high, with a good view of the other halls and the university. Howitt Hall is the third oldest hall, and was opened in September 1966. The hall is named after Alfred Howitt, a scholar and prominent figure in early Gippsland.
  • Farrer Hall is divided into two buildings, Commons and Lords, with an annex to Commons called Chastity which is located above the common room. The Hall has more focus on floors, with kitchens, laundries and common rooms shared across them.
  • Richardson Hall (Richo) is the newest of the Halls of Residence at Monash University. Richardson is home to 190 residents. Richardson ‘has’ been known as the ‘International hall’ to residents of other halls, due to the high numbers of international students residing in Richardson.
  • Deakin Hall was the first residence hall established at Monash University in Australia, in September, 1962. [1] The residence hall was named afterAlfred Deakin, Prime Minister from 1903-1910 and father of the Australian Constitution.
  • Roberts Hall is named after Tom Roberts, an Australian artist who was affectionately known as ‘the bulldog’. The mascot of Roberts Hall is a bulldog in recognition of this.
  • The South East Flats is located at the south-eastern corner of the university’s Clayton campus. It is made up of two block of flats|blocks of flats, and the flat sizes range from 2 bedrooms to 5 bedrooms. There are 30 flats in total, designed to accommo
    date 130 students.

The campus is also adjacent to Mannix College, a residential college affiliated with Monash University.[29]

  • Mannix College is located near the south-western corner of the university’s Clayton campus, adjacent to the Monash Clayton bus interchange. It is made up of two wings of dormitories, Hoevers and Malarkey, each with three levels and approximately 40 students per floor, giving a total student residence of approximately 240. Mannix is the only on-campus residence to provide fully catered board and lodging.
  1. 10 Caulfield campus

H Building on the Caulfield campus in Victoria, Australia

The Caulfield campus is Monash University’s second largest campus. Its multifaceted nature is reflected in the range of programs it offers through the faculties of Arts, Art & Design, Business & Economics, Information Technology and Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences. A major building program has been announced, to expand teaching facilities, provide student accommodation and redevelop the shopping centre. The Law faculty for Monash University will relocate to the Caulfield campus by the end of 2011.[30]

  1. 11 Other Australian campuses

One of Monash’s newest, Berwick campus was built on the old Casey airfield in the south-eastern growth corridor of Victoria, Australia. The town of Berwick has experienced an influx of people and development in recent times, which includes the new campus of Monash University. With a presence in the area since 1994, the first Monash Berwick campus building was completed in 1996 and the third building in March 2004. It is situated on a 55-hectare site in the City of Casey, one of the three fastest growing municipalities in Australia

The Gippsland campus is home to 2,000 on-campus students, 5,000 off-campus students and nearly 400 staff. The campus sits in the Latrobe Valleytown of Churchill, 142 km east of Melbourne on 63 hectares of landscaped grounds. It is the only non-metropolitan campus of Monash University. The campus offers many undergraduate degrees, and attracts many students from the Latrobe Valley, East and West Gippsland. The Gippsland Medical School, offering postgraduate entry Bachelor of Medicine / Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) courses was officially opened by the Federal Minister for Health and Ageing,Nicola Roxon in June 2008, providing students with a unique opportunity to learn medicine in a rural setting working with rural practitioners.[31]

The Parkville campus is situated in the Melbourne suburb of Parkville, around 2 km north of the Melbourne CBD on Royal Parade. The campus is the home of the Faculty of Pharmacy and Phamaceutical Sciences. The faculty has a reputation for innovation[citation needed], particularly in the areas of formulation science and medicinal chemistry and offers the Bachelor of Pharmacy and Bachelor of Pharmaceutical Science undergraduate degrees, the latter replacing the Bachelor of Formulation Science in 2007 and the Bachelor of Medicinal Chemistry in 2008. Double degrees are also offered including the Bachelor of Pharmacy/Commerce with the Business and Economics faculty at Clayton, and also the Bachelor of Engineering/Pharmaceutical Science with the Engineering faculty. It also offers postgraduate degrees.

The Peninsula campus has a teaching and research focus on health and wellbeing, and is a hub of undergraduate and postgraduates studies in Nursing, Health Science, Physiotherapy and Psychology – and particularly in Emergency Health (Paramedic) courses.

The campus is located in the bayside suburb of Frankston on the edge of Melbourne. Peninsula campus also offers a range of courses including those from its historic roots with early childhood and primary education (during the 1960s and 1970’s the campus was the State Teacher’s College), and Business & Economics (since the merger of the State Teacher’s College with the Caulfield Institute of Technology to create the Chisholm Institute of Technology in 1982). The campus was also home to the Peninsula School of Information Technology, which in 2006 was wound back with Information Technology units previously offered being relocated to the Caulfield campus.

  1. 12 Overseas campuses

The Monash University Sunway campus in Malaysia opened in 1998 in Bandar Sunway, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The Sunway campus offers various undergraduate degrees through its faculties of Medicine and Health Sciences, Engineering, Information Technology, Business, and Arts and Sciences. It is currently home to almost 4,000 students. The new purpose-built campus opened in 2007, providing a high-tech home for Monash in Malaysia. In addition to a wide range of undergraduate degrees, the campus also offers both postgraduate Masters and PhD programs. Its degrees in Medicine and Surgery are the first medical degrees outside Australia and New Zealand to be accredited by the Australian Medical Council.

Monash South Africa is situated on the western outskirts of Johannesburg, and opened its doors in 2001. The campus is expanding, with student numbers growing at 35% per year and expected to be 2,400 in 2008.[citation needed] A new learning commons opened in 2007 and in early 2008, new housing will mean the campus will be able to provide secure on-campus accommodation for 1,000 students. The campus offers undergraduate courses from the faculties of business and economics, arts and IT.

The Monash University Prato Centre is located in the 18th Century Palace, Palazzo Vaj, in the historic centre of Prato, a city near Florence in Italy. Primarily, it hosts students from Monash’s other campuses for semesters in Law, Art and Design, History, Music, as well as various international conferences. The Department of Business Law and Taxation, in the Faculty of Business and Economics also runs subjects in Prato. It was officially opened in 2001 as part of the University’s vigorous internationalisation policy. It is now the largest Australian academic institution of its kind in Europe.[citation needed]

The IITB-Monash Research Academy opened in 2008 and is situated in MumbaiIndia.[32] It is a partnership between Monash and the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay. It aims to carry out high impact research in engineering and sciences, particularly clean energy, biotechnology and nanotechnology. Students undertake their research in both India and Australia, with supervisors from both Monash and IITB. Upon graduating, they receive a dual PhD from the two institutions.[33] In the month following its official opening, 36 joint projects had commenced, with a further several hundred planned. Construction of a new $5m facility began in November 2008.[34]

  1. 13 Monash College

As a wholly-owned subsidiary of Monash University, Monash College is an educational institute providing students with an alternative point of entry to Monash University. The institution offers pathway studies for students who endeavor to undertake studies at one of Monash University’s many campuses. Monash College’s specialised undergraduate diplomas (Diploma Part 2 is equivalent to first-year university) provide an alternative entry point into more than 50 Monash University bachelor degrees, taught intensively in smaller classes and an environment overall similar to that offered by the university.

Monash College offers programs in several countries throughout the world, with colleges located in Australia (Melbourne), China (Guangzhou), Indonesia (Jakarta), Singapore and Sri Lanka (Colombo).

  1. 14 Monash University English Language Centre

As a wholly-owned subsidiary of Monash University, Monash University English Language Centre (MUELC) is an educational organisation providing students with an alternative pathway to Monash College and Monash University courses.

  1. Faculties

Monash is divided into 10 faculties. These incorporate the University’s major departments of teaching and research centres.

Stand-alone, interdisciplinary research centres, which are not located within one faculty, include:

  1. Rankings

The following publications ranked universities worldwide. Monash University ranked:

Publications

Ave.

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

Times Higher Education Supplement[35]

39.8

33

33

38

43

47

45

Shanghai Jiao Tong University[36]

152-200

202-300

203-300

201-300

201-300

201-302

Global University Ranking[37]

74-77

Newsweek[38]

73

Economist Intelligence Unit‘s MBA rank[39]

46

49

43

47

Webometrics:[40]

124

144

104

111 (Jan.), 137 (Jul.)

Research produced by the Melbourne Institute in 2006 ranked Australian universities across seven main discipline areas: Arts and Humanities, Business and Economics, Education, Engineering, Law, Medicine, and Science.

For each discipline, Monash University was ranked:[41]

Discipline

R1*

No.

R2*

No.

Arts and Humanities

4

38

4

35

Business and Economics

5

39

4

34

Education

2

35

3

32

Engineering

4

28

5

28

Law

5

29

5

28

Medicine

3

14

4

13

Science

6

38

8

31

* R1 refers to Australian and overseas Academics’ rankings in tables 3.1 -3.7 of the report. R2 refers to the Articles and Research rankings in tables 5.1 – 5.7 of the report. No. refers to the number of institutions in the table against which Monash is compared.

Other rankings[42]:

  • The Monash Clayton campus was ranked number 1 in Australia for student experience by the National Union of Students of Australia in 2007[43]
  • In life sciences and biomedicine, Monash was ranked 25th best in the world by Times Higher Education in 2009
  • In social sciences, it was ranked 26th best in the world by Times Higher Education in 2009[44]
  • In the employer review category, in which employers rate the quality of a university’s graduates, Times Higher Education ranked Monash 15th best in the world in 2008.[45]
  • In the international students category, Times Higher Education ranked Monash 17th best in the world in 2008.[46]
  • The Monash MBA was ranked number 2 in the world by the Economist Intelligence Unit in the category of “personal development and educational experience”[47]
  • The Monash Faculty of Business and Economics School was ranked the best business school in Australia by Webometrics in 2009.[48]
  1. Notable alumni and faculty

Main article: List of Monash University people

Monash has a long list of alumni who have become prominent in a wide range of areas. 1100 Monash graduates (or 8.33% of the total) are listed among the 13,200 biographies of Australia’s most notable individuals in the 2008 edition of Who’s Who in Australia.

Monash graduates who are currently leaders in their fields include the Governor of Victoria, the Chief Justice of Victoria, the Treasurer of Victoria, the Vice President of Indonesia, the Australian Cardinal of the Catholic Church, the Australian Minister for Trade, the Lord Mayor of Melbourne, the Chief Judge of theCounty Court of Victoria, the Chief Magistrate of Victoria, the Coroner of Victoria, the Chief Justice of the Family Court of Australia, the Chief Justice ofNorfolk Island, two of the past three Australians of the Year, several Australian Living Treasures, the Chairman of the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC), the Chairman of the Singapore Economic Development Board, the Chairman of the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission(ACCC), numerous Government Ministers throughout Australia and overseas, Ambassadors to the United Nations, prominent entrepreneurseconomists,public servantsdiplomatsfilm producers (including this year’s only Australian winner of an Academy Award), artists (including winners of the Dobell Prize),actorsplaywrights (including winners of AWGIE Awards), novelists (including winners of the Booker Prize and the Miles Franklin Award), journalists,musicians (including winners of ARIA Awards and the Grand Prix du Disque), mayorsphilanthropistsscientistssurgeons and sportspeople (includingOlympic Games Gold medallists).

  1. Libraries, Museums and Galleries
  2. 19 Monash University Library

Monash University Library is one of Australia’s leading academic libraries, with a long-standing reputation for technological innovation and excellence in customer service. Currently it operates several libraries in all of its campuses, spanning over 3 continents. Monash University Library has just under 3 million items.

  1. 20 Rare Books Collection

Located at the Sir Louis Matheson Library on the Clayton Campus, the Rare Books Collection consists of over 100,000 items, unique due to their age, uniqueness or physical beauty, which can be accessed by Monash staff and students. The collection was started in 1961 when the University Librarian purchased original manuscripts by Jonathan Swift and some of his contemporaries. The Collection now consists of a range of items including photography, children’s books, 15th-17th century English and French literature, original manuscripts and pamphlets. A variety of exhibitions are hosted throughout the year in the Rare Books area.[49]

  1. 21 Monash University Museum of Art

The Monash University Museum of Art (MUMA) was founded in 1961 and is located in a large building on the University’s Clayton Campus. The establishment of the Museum reflected a desire by the University’s founders for students to obtain a broad education, including an appreciation and understanding of the arts. Its collection has now grown to over 1500 works,[50] including a variety of items from artists such as Arthur BoydWilliam Dobell,Sidney NolanHoward ArkleyTracey MoffattJohn PercevalFred Williams and Bill Henson. While the gallery’s focus is on Australian art, it houses a number of international works and exhibitions. It hosts regular exhibitions which are open to Monash students and staff, as well as the general public.[51] The current Curator of the Museum is Geraldine Barlow. In 2009, the University announced that the Museum would be moving to a new facility at the Caulfield Campus, reflecting Caulfield’s role as the University’s home of visual arts.[52]

  1. 22 Switchback Gallery

The Switchback Gallery was opened in 1995 in the landscaped gardens of the University’s Gippsland Campus, and has become a cultural focal point for the region. It hosts a diverse range of exhibitions each year, from work by Monash students, to displays by international artists.[53]

  1. 23 Monash Faculty of Art and Design Gallery

The Art and Design Faculty houses its own collection of artwork. It is located at the University’s Caulfield campus. Its collection includes a wide range of media including painting, tapestry, printmedia, ce
ramics, jewellery, photomedia, industrial design, digital media and installation. In addition to being a public gallery, it runs a Visiting Artists program which attracts artists from around the world to spend a year at the gallery.[54]

  1. Sport

Sport at Monash University is overseen by Monash Sport, a department of the University which employs over 200 staff.[55] Currently, there are 47 sporting clubs at the University.[56]

Each campus has a range of sporting facilities used by students and staff, including football, cricket, hockey, soccer, rugby and baseball fields; tennis, squash and badminton courts; gyms and swimming pools. The University also has an alpine lodge at Mt Buller.

Monash’s sporting teams compete in a range of local and national competitions. Monash sends the largest number of students of any Australian university to the Australian University Games, in which it was Overall Champion in 2008 and 2009.[57]

  1. Vice-Chancellors & Chancellors

The Vice-Chancellor is the chief executive of the University, who is head of Monash’s day-to-day activities. The Vice-Chancellor is also the University President. In North America and parts of Europe, the equivalent role is the President or Principal.

The Chancellor is chair of the University Council and provides advice to the Vice-Chancellor, but serves primarily as the ceremonial figurehead.

  1. 26 Vice-Chancellors
  1. 27 Chancellors
  1. Colleges and Halls of Residence

Monash Residential Services (MRS) is responsible for co-ordinating the operation of on-campus halls of residence. MRS manages a variety of facilities at all five Australian campuses and South Africa.

The following residences are based at the Clayton Campus:

List of colleges

College

Affiliation

Howitt Hall

1966-

Farrer Hall

1965-

Richardson Hall

1972-

Deakin Hall

1961-

Roberts Hall

1971-

Normanby House

1960s-

Mannix College

1969-

South East Flats

Facilities are diverse and vary in services offered. Information on residential services at Monash University, including on-campus (MRS managed) and off-campus, can be found at http://www.mrs.monash.edu.au/.

  1. Student organisations

There are approximately 55,000 students at the university, represented by individual campus organisations and the university-wide Monash Postgraduate Association.

Other notable student organisations include:

  1. See also
  1. Notes and references
    1. ^ http://www.monash.edu.au/about/vcmessage.html
    2. ^ http://www.monash.edu/about/overview/snapshot.html
    3. ^ http://www.monash.edu.au/about/
    4. ^ http://www.ita.monash.edu/
    5. ^ http://www.iitbmonash.org/about.html
    6. ^ Did you know? – (Monash Memo, 9 July 2008)
    7. ^ VTAC:Institutions
    8. ^ Monash Memo – University News
    9. ^ http://www.adm.monash.edu.au/execserv/council/meetings/2007/07-05cnm.html

10.  ^ http://www.monash.edu.au/news/newsline/story/1401

11.  ^ Top VCE students choose Monash, Monash University

12.  ^ Official shield and motto, Monash University

13.  ^ List of Australian Universities with date of foundation

14.  ^ History, Clayton campus, Monash University

15.  ^ Previous exhibitions – Rare Books Collection (Monash University Library)

16.  ^ Where have all the rebels gone? – About the University – The University of Sydney

17.  ^ About the Trust

18.  ^ Those were the days, Monash Magazine article

19.  ^ Monash University 50th Anniversary, Monash University

20.  ^ Our Contribution – Monash IVF Australia

21.  ^ Simon Marginson, Monash: Remaking the University, Allen & Unwin, 2000, p. 97

22.  ^ Brief history of Monash (Monash University)

23.  ^ Statistics, Monash University

24.  ^ Simon Marginson, “Monash University” in The Encyclopaedia of Melbourne, Andrew Brown-May & Shurlee Swain (eds), Cambridge University Press, Port Melbourne, 2005

25.  ^ Australian Stem Cell Centre

26.  ^ Media Release: VICTORIA TO HOST KEY SEMINARS AT BIO2006

27.  ^ Monash academic to head Victoria’s Regenerative Medicine Institute – (Monash Memo, 9 May 2007)

28.  ^ Official Australian Synchrotron website

29.  ^ Mannix College

30.  ^ http://www.monash.edu.au/campuses/caulfield/campuspresentation21may2008.pdf

31.  ^ News, Gippsland Campus, Monash University

32.  ^ http://www.iitbmonash.org/about.html

33.  ^ http://www.monash.edu.au/news/newsline/story/1474

34.  ^ http://www.campusreview.com.au/pages/section/article.php?s=Faculty+Focus&ss=Engineering%2C+IT%2FComputer+Science%2C+Architecture+%26+Design&idArticle=6117

35.  ^ The Times Higher Education Supplement

36.  ^ Institute of Higher Education, Shanghai Jiao Tong University.

37.  ^ http://www.globaluniversitiesranking.org/images/banners/top-100(eng).pdf

38.  ^ “The Top 100 Global Universities, Newsweek” Newsweek’s ranking of Monash University.

39.  ^ Monash University’s MBA rank with EIU.

40.  ^ Monash University’s Webometric ranking

41.  ^ Melbourne Institute rankings

42.  ^ Reputation

43.  ^ Student union lashes unis for ‘poor support’ The Australian

44.  ^ http://www.monash.edu.au/news/newsline/story/1519

45.  ^ http://www.topuniversities.com/university-rankings/world-university-rankings/2008/indicator-rankings/employer-review

46.  ^ http://www.topuniversities.com/university-rankings/world-university-rankings/2008/indicator-rankings/international-students

47.  ^ Monash Newsline (Monash University)

48.  ^ http://business-schools.webometrics.info/rank_by_country.asp?country=au

49.  ^ Rare Books Collection (Monash University Library)

50.  ^ 50 years of art, Monash Magazine, issue 21, 2008

51.  ^ MUMA Monash University Museum of Art

52.  ^ http://www.monash.edu.au/pubs/monmag/issue24-2009/features/on-the-move.html

53.  ^ Switchback gallery

54.  ^ Faculty Gallery

55.  ^ http://sport.monash.edu.au/about.html

56.  ^ http://www.sport.monash.edu.au/sportsprograms/sports-clubs.html

57.  ^ http://www.sport.monash.edu/aug/

58.  ^ New Monash University Vice-Chancellor appointed

59.  ^
MAD – The Monash Association of Debaters – We’re MAD

  1. External links

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

November 18, 2008

IEA-A glad to announce that TAFE NSW – Illawarra Institute is  offering international students an opportunity to undertake a two year  combined Diploma in Hospitality Management and Certificate 3 in Commercial Cookery customised program to be delivered through our Snowy Mountains based Cooma Campus and our coastal based Nowra Campus. As you know commercial cookery program is one of the Migration Occupation Demand List.

 

A key feature of the program will be four “guaranteed” paid seasonal employment placements in both Australia’s spectacular Snowy Mountains region for the 2009 and 2010 Australian winter ski seasons (June – October) and on the pristine New South Wales South Coast for the peak summer holiday period (December 2009 – January 2010 and December 2010 – January 2011).

 

During these 4 “guaranteed” paid seasonal employment placements (total guaranteed employment placement is 56 weeks), students can earn minimum 550 AUD up to  750 AUD per weeks.

 

It means during these 56 weeks student can earn 30800 AUD – 42000 AUD. In addition to that students still can work 20 hours per week while they are studying.

 

There are very limited number of places are available, so please make required announcement to your student base now to not miss this great opportunity.

International Education Agency-AUSTRALIA

www.mystudyinaustralia.com

www.inteducation.com

www.avustralyadaegitim.com