September 19, 2020

Research shows that Australia continues to be one of the most affordable overseas study destinations, with costs of living and course fees significantly lower than the USA and UK. Reports that Australia will significantly increase tuition fees and other costs are not correct. In spite of its small population, Australia has the third largest number of international students of English speaking nations.

Research shows that Australia continues to be one of the most affordable overseas study destinations, with costs of living and course fees significantly lower than the USA and UK. Reports that Australia will significantly increase tuition fees and other costs are not correct. In spite of its small population, Australia has the third largest number of international students of English speaking nations.

Reasons to be cheerful: Australia adds up for international students

New data from English language testing company IDP Education is sending an upbeat signal to Australian universities that international students may be ready to come back in big numbers as COVID-19 begins to receding.

When IDP Education published its results in August it said anecdotally 74 per cent of overseas students wanted to resume their studies once the pandemic was over.

“International students know the cost of study in Australia and they know the limits of post-study work rights, but they are still keen to come,” says Andrew Barkla from IDP Education.

In an interview with The Australian Financial Review on Thursday, chief executive Andrew Barkla said the company now had hard numbers showing “a pipeline of 82,000 students who have applications for the next six months and are ready to go”.

Given Australia accounts for 47 per cent of the student volumes that IDP places internationally, Mr Barkla agreed it was reasonable to expect at least 38,000 customers of the company were thinking of coming to Australia.

And given that 120,000 international enrolments could be expected in Australian universities in 2021, the fact that one provider alone could speak for up to a third of that volume was encouraging.

IDP has a dominant position with the International English Language Testing System, which it developed with the British Council and Cambridge University.

“These are students who want an onshore campus experience. But more than that they know their circumstances,” Mr Barkla said.

“They understand the price the universities charge. They know the cost of living and how the dials are set for post-study work rights. So they have the complete picture and they still want to come.”

The next step was for government to send a signal that the door is open to international students. Pilot programs to fly students to Australia were important even if the numbers were only small because they signalled a government commitment to the scheme.

Pilot programs needed

“We need to get these pilot programs moving. We need a level of public confidence so students and families see they can be done in a secure and safe way that benefits the public as well as the students,” Mr Barkla said.

“Pilot programs are a signpost that Australia is prioritising the opening up of the international sector.”

The Northern Territory said it would accept 100 international students and South Australia will take 300, although neither has committed to a date. By contrast, the UK is taking any international student arrivals and Canada is accepting any who can proved face-to-face teaching is their only option.

Australia also had not done as well as Canada and the UK in supporting students stuck in the country during the ban on international travel.

But on post-study work rights, which are important for international students who want work in their host country to pay off education, Australia was “not doing too badly”, Mr Barkla said.

A single reform to post-study work rights would make a difference: allowing overseas students who are studying online to include the online study they do in their home country towards a work-visa entitlement, instead of being able to include only those hours physically studying in Australia.

He doubted there would be a long-term setback from Australia’s political dissonance with China.

“The Chinese family who is looking to send their child overseas – they are pretty savvy. And they’re pretty connected beyond what they read in the Chinese press,” Mr Barkla said.

Interest to study in Australia increasing

“I’ve been in webinars and on roadshows in China and, looking forward, the interest in Australia and the UK as a study destination is increasing. If anything, it’s the geopolitical tension between China and that US gets more attention.

“So the number of parents who would normally be looking to the US are now shifting their interest to the UK or Australia.”

In a recent interview with the Financial Review the vice-chancellor of the University of NSW, Ian Jacobs, said he was optimistic on the outlook for universities because demand for education was moving to a higher level.

“In the 19th century, primary education was extended to most people. In the 20th century, it was secondary education. In the 21st century, tertiary education will be available to all,” he said.

“And Australia is placed to deliver that, face-to-face, online, short or long courses, undergraduate and postgraduate.”

His optimism is shared by Mr Barkla. After in initial pandemic-related fall, IDP’s English language testing volumes have returned to 55 per cent of what they were pre-COVID-19.

As restrictions ease the company has plans to open another 50 labs globally to add capacity.

IDP Education has a business model universities would envy, and could possibly learn from.

When COVID-19 hit Mr Barkla asked staff to accept a 20 per cent cut in salary (a higher percentage for senior executives), and in return he would guarantee no job losses. Within five days 100 per cent of staff had signed up.

At the height of the crisis it raised $250 million in the market to bolster its cash position, and so far it has burned through just $27 million.

 

Source: Australian Financial Review

March 25, 2020

As you will be aware, Australia has introduced health and safety measures and travel restrictions to prevent the spread of the novel Coronavirus.

Confirmed cases by local health district (LHD) Across NSW – 25 March 2020

We understand this may be confusing if you’re commencing your studies, so read the below information to find out if you are impacted by the changes, and where you can go for support.

Will I be impacted?

Anyone hoping to travel to and from Australia will be impacted by the recent changes as the Australian Government announced that:

  • A travel ban will be placed on all non-residents and non-Australian citizens coming to Australia, effective from 9pm on Friday, 20 March 2020
  • all Australian and residents will be able to return and are required to self-isolate for 14 days
  • all Australians are advised to not travel overseas at this time. This is the highest advice level (level 4 of 4).

Information about Coronavirus is updated regularly, so it’s important to keep up to date with latest news from Australia.

For the latest information about the Coronavirus in Australia, visit these websites:

International students in Australia

All travellers to Australia from midnight, 15 March 2020 are required to self-isolate for 14 days. Self-isolating means you’re required to stay in your local accommodation. 

You’ll need to avoid going out into public spaces such as restaurants, supermarkets, workplaces, universities and any other public places that you will come into contact with people. Additionally, avoid receiving visitors into your home or local accommodation.

If you need more information on self-isolation, get more details by downloading  the Isolation Guidance information sheet from the Department of Health website. If you need to use public transport (e.g. taxis, ride-hail services, train, buses and trams.), kindly follow the precautions listed in the public transport guide.

If you’re starting your studies during the time you’re required to self-isolate, contact your school or university to discuss your study options. Many universities have put in place measures to assist students who are required to self-isolate, such as delayed semester starts or online study options.

If you, or any friends and family start showing flu-like symptoms such as a cough, fever, sore throat or shortness of breath, it is important to contact your local doctor. You can also monitor your symptoms using the Coronavirus (COVID-19) symptom checker. Call before you visit and explain your symptoms and travel history to ensure they are prepared to receive you.

If you require immediate and urgent medical attention, you can call 000. Any ambulance and hospital fees will be covered by your Overseas Student Health Cover (OSHC).

These measures are put in place to limit the possibility of spreading the Coronavirus to the general population.

How do I get food and other essentials?

Ask others who are not in isolation to get food and other essentials for you. If you are new to the country and don’t know anyone who can help you, you can order your food and groceries online.

Food delivery and ordering apps

Menulog

Deliveroo

Uber Eats

Happy Cow (vegan and vegetarian)

Open table

Groceries

Coles

Woolworths

Will this impact my university start date?

If you’re enrolled in Semester 1 2020 and unable to begin classes due to the travel bans or the 14-day self-isolation, you’ll need to get in touch with your university or school as soon as possible to discuss your enrolment.

Many Australian universities have delayed their semester start dates or have put in place changes to assist international students who have been impacted by the recent travel bans.

We recommend you contact your university or school as soon as possible to discuss your possible study options or deferring your studies to start at a later date. 

You can also check out the following websites for current advice and information that may assist you:

Curtin University

Federation University

Flinders University

Go8 Universities

Griffith University

La Trobe University

Macquarie University

Monash University

Queensland University of Technology

RMIT

Swinburne University

The Australian National University

The University of Adelaide

The University of Queensland

The University of Western Australia

University of Melbourne 

University of South Australia

University of Sydney

University of Technology Sydney

University of Wollongong

UNSW

Victoria University

Western Sydney University

Changes to student accommodation

If you have arranged for student accomodation and can’t travel into the country, then it’s vital you check in with your student accommodation about your next steps.

Some student accommodation providers may require you to provide additional information or may change or delay your accommodation arrangements.

Where can I go for support?

The outbreak of the novel Coronavirus presents an emotionally challenging situation for many international students. The spread of the virus may be causing you or your friends and family distress or anxiety, especially if you have loved ones in affected areas or have not been able to return home or to Australia because of the recent travel bans. 

The Australian Government have created a dedicated and multi-lingual support service for international students. You can contact them via email or phone 1300 981 621 (8:00 am–8:00 pm AEDST Monday to Friday). 

You can also visit the Australian Government Department of Education website to download the latest information, guides and FAQs for up-to-date general health and enrolment advice, where to access support services, and news on the latest immigration and border protection measures.

You can also access the links below:

Support for International Students affected by the Novel Coronavirus

Novel Coronavirus FAQ for International Students

Changes in international flight arrangements

If you have flight arrangements in place, your plans may be affected by travel bans or cancelled flights.

Many major airlines and countries are cancelling flights or restricting entry. If you have overseas travel plans, it’s important to regularly check your airline’s website or contact the airline directly for next steps and travel options at a later date.

Changes to IELTS testing

There are currently changes being made to IELTS testing. Visit the IELTS website to find out if the changes will affect you.

December 28, 2017

Population growth will help propel Australia to become the world’s 11th biggest economy within a decade, a report predicts.
The London-based Centre for Economics and Business Research is forecasting Australia will climb two places on its world economic league table by 2026 from its current ranking of 13.
Countries that depend on brainpower to drive their economies will generally overtake those dependent on natural resources, with China tipped to replace the US as the world’s biggest economy in 2030, the centre says.
While Australia’s economic growth has been fuelled by resources in recent years, the centre also noted that it’s become one of the most popular countries in the world for inward migration.

The London-based Centre for Economics and Business Research is forecasting Australia will climb two places on its world economic league table by 2026 from its current ranking of 13. And it’s particularly Australia’s intake of migrants with highly sought-after skills that will help fuel its future growth.
“Australia is one of the most popular countries in the world for inward migration as well as having natural resources.
“The growing population means that the economy is forecast to rise from 13th largest in 2017 to 11th largest economy in 2026.
“Investment in urban infrastructure will need to accelerate as population increases.”
Australia welcomed 245,400 immigrants in the year ending June 30, 2017, a 27 per cent increase from the year before.
 

“The growing population means the economy is forecast to rise from 13th largest in 2017 to 11th largest economy in 2026,” said the centre’s 2018 World Economic League Table, which ranks the world’s economies by gross domestic product measured in US dollars at market prices to 2030.
Image result for australia 11th biggest economy
 

December 14, 2017


Australia’s international education industry has strengthened across the board, pushing student numbers to new record levels according to the latest data. But doubts have started to emerge over how long the country can maintain its growth streak.
Records continued to fall for Australian international education, but clouds are starting to form, as the country’s reliance on China increases.
The number of international students within Australia currently sits at 9.4% above the 554,200 for the whole of 2016

Year to October data, released by the Department of Education and Training, shows more than 606,700 international students have entered Australia so far in 2017, a 13% increase from the level achieved by the same time in 2016, while enrolments and commencements also experienced double-digit percentage growth.

“The more Australia can do to discover or seek out new markets, the better for the international education sector as a whole”
The surge in numbers has also pushed up total revenue, with the Australian Bureau of Statistics indicating the 12 months to September period grew to a landmark $29.4bn, up from $28.4bn last quarter.
The figure for students, enrolments and commencements as of October has already surpassed that for the whole of 2016.
The number of international students within Australia currently sits 9.4% above the 2016 total of 554,200, while enrolments and commencements – the number of new enrolments in a calendar year – are 7.5% and 2% higher, respectively.
English Australia noted September 2017’s figures were 6.7% down from September 2016
While the figures are welcomed in Australia, not all sectors and source markets experienced consistent improvements, casting doubt over how long the boom will last.
Although 3.3% above the previous year’s October figures, ELICOS stands alone as the only sector to not yet surpass 2016 totals, and after a strong first half of 2017, experienced two consecutive declines in commencements in August and September.
It was the only major sector to do so.
In its latest market analysis report, English Australia noted September 2017’s figures were 6.7% down from September 2016, representing “arguably the first poor month at the national aggregate level for ELICOS in recent years.”
Meanwhile, China further strengthened its position as Australia’s top source market, increasing 18% from the same period in 2016 and pushing its market share across all sectors from 27.5% to approximately 30%; reaching as high as 60% for some sectors.
source:  thepienews.com

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June 9, 2017
 Five Australian university are among the world’s top 50 universities and 7 are in the top 100, according to a major global ranking that shows Australian universities have made overall improvements in all measures, including teaching, employability and research.
Australian National University is the highest ranked in the country at 20th place in the 2018 QS World University Rankings.
It is followed by the University of Melbourne, ranked at 41, the University of New South Wales at 45, the University of Queensland at 47 and the University of Sydney at 50.
Monash University, with a rank of 60, and the University of Western Australia at 93 round out the seven Australian universities in the top 100.

An institution’s rank is determined by its academic and employer reputations, student-to-faculty ratio, citations per faculty, and international faculty and student ratios.
A total of 37 Australian Government universities are included in this year’s ranking, which covers 959 universities around the world and measures performance in research, teaching, employability and internationalisation.

Belinda Robinson, chief executive of peak sector body Universities Australia, said the ranking is especially important to international students choosing a university.
“Global rankings are a major factor for many international students in deciding where to study, so they’re also very important to the $22.4 billion a year that international students bring into Australia’s economy,” Ms Robinson said.

“These impressive rises underscore the global competitiveness of Australia’s universities and the excellent quality of our education and research on the world stage.”

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is the top ranked university in the world for the sixth consecutive year, followed by Stanford University, Harvard University, the California Institute of Technology, the University of Cambridge, the University of Oxford, University College London, Imperial College London, the University of Chicago and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology.

MIT has been described as “the nucleus of an unrivalled innovation ecosystem” by QS Quacquarelli Symonds, the education analysis firm behind the ranking, which notes that companies created by the university’s alumni have a combined revenue of $2 trillion, the equivalent of the world’s 11th largest economy.
Research director at QS Quacquarelli Symonds, Ben Sowter, said the improved ranking of Australian universities can be partially attributed to the changing political climate in countries such as the US and UK increasing Australia’s comparative popularity.

“Higher internationalisation scores certainly reflect coherent international outreach efforts made by university marketing departments,” Mr Sowter said. “However, they also reflect the increased desirability of Australian higher education in the light of current political situations in the United States and United Kingdom – typically Australia’s main Anglosphere competitors.
“Improvements in scores for Academic Reputation can be attributed to both the type of teaching innovations … and the standard of research emanating from Australia’s universities.”

 
 
Source: smh.com.au

December 2, 2016

studyinaustralia_students_large

International education experts believe the country may benefit even more from political and economic changes in Britain and the United States.
International education’s value to Australia has surged past 20 billion Australian dollars ($14.8 billion U.S.), confirming the industry’s status as the country’s third-biggest earner and easily the largest export of services.
New figures from the Australian Bureau of Statistics show that international education has shrugged off a cocktail of problems — including a high Australian dollar, officious visa administration and attacks against foreign students — to post a new revenue record.
Experts say the resurgence could accelerate, if Brexit and Donald Trump’s successful presidential campaign stem student flows to Australia’s two biggest competitors. Figures released last week showed that the growth in the number of Chinese students enrolling at U.S. institutions last year was the lowest in a decade.

Australia’s international education exports totaled 20.3 billion Australian dollars ($15 billion) last financial year, an 8 percent rise compared with 2014-15.
The figure includes fees and onshore spending on goods and services such as food and accommodation, as well as royalties, consultancies and other related services.
Most of the income came from foreigners studying at universities, with the higher education sector attracting about 14 billion Australian dollars ($10.4 billion).
Vocational training institutions earned about 3 billion Australian, English language colleges 1 billion and schools 800 million ($2.2 billion, $740 million and $592 million, respectively).

Universities Australia, which represents institutions, said international education helped sustain Australian living standards, supporting more than 130,700 jobs.
It said more than 320,000 students from 130 countries were currently studying in Australia’s universities.
“Through the exchange of students on a grand scale, we’re forging relationships that underpin our future diplomacy, trade, business links, cultural insight and personal connections,” said Universities Australia’s chief executive, Belinda Robinson.
Meanwhile, newly released government data reveal that Australia’s most prestigious universities are continuing to increase dramatically the number of international students they enroll, largely to help cover the costs of research.
While the national average was just shy of 20 percent international student enrollments, last year Melbourne University enrolled 18,384 overseas students — or 31.2 percent of its total enrollment, up from 16,140 the previous year.
Melbourne was followed by the Australian National University, with 28 percent international students.
The University of Sydney, University of New South Wales, Monash University, University of Technology Sydney and RMIT University all had more than one in four students from overseas.
Previous research has demonstrated that international students not only subsidize the teaching of domestic students but also keep afloat the multimillion-dollar research efforts of major universities.
However, Melbourne’s overseas student enrollments pale in comparison with Federation University in Ballarat, where 42.5 percent of students come from overseas, and Gold Coast-based Bond University, with 41.3 percent.
Local undergraduate students contribute 10,440 Australian dollars ($7,729) a year to study business. For international students, fees to study for a business degree next year range from 19,920 Australian dollars ($14,746) at the University of New England to 39,264 Australian dollars ($29,065) at research-intensive Melbourne University.
Phil Honeywood, chief executive of the International Education Association of Australia, warned that any increase in students deciding against the U.S. or Britain could be tempered by increased competition from Canada, China and New Zealand.

Source: www.insidehighered.com

May 4, 2016

migration-to-australia
Migration to Australia 2014 – 2015

The Australian government has announced that the migration programs for 2017 will remain for the fifth year in a row at its highest level – 190,000 permanent residency places.
Migration numbers according to categories will be

  • 128,550 for skilled migration (including General Skilled Migration, permanent Employer Sponsorship and Business Skills) and
  • 57,400 places for family migration.

The remaining places will include

  • 565 under the Special Eligibility stream and
  • 3,485 for Child category migrants.

This break down of the available permanent residency places remains exactly the same as the 2015-16 program year that is now nearing conclusion.
The official media release from the Minister for Immigration and Border Protection with these 2016-17 Migration Program figures can be found here
 

May 3, 2015

Australian International Students
International Students’ numbers are increasing for Australia

Yet another review has landed on desks around Canberra. A newly released 160-page Productivity Commission paper on International Education Services has underlined what many of us who work in this dynamic sector already know.
Not only is international education kicking goals for our beleaguered economy but it continues to enhance Australia’s global credentials. Notwithstanding this, the report also warns this $17 billion a year industry that more regulatory reform might be required if Australia is to remain the study destination of choice.
Up front, the Productivity Commission’s report is very much a good news story. It finds that our nation’s third-largest export creates 130,000 equivalent full-time jobs. These jobs are not just in teaching but cut across the entire economy, including the provision of accommodation, food, entertainment and even tourism.
There are more than 450,000 full-tuition, fee-paying international students in Australia now, accounting for 20 per cent of all students enrolled in our higher education institutions and 5 per cent in vocational education and training (VET). Importantly for our future relations in our region, about three-quarters of all international students come from Asia, with China and India the biggest markets.
Of equal importance, the report noted that we have another 160,000 enrolments in Australian courses delivered offshore, with an increasing number of these in the advanced skills (VET) sector. Overall, our international education industry has recovered from recent years of declining enrolments and the commission concludes that it “is back on a high-growth trajectory”.
So where is the flip side to all this good news? The Productivity Commission points to four key areas of concern. These relate to governance, student visa integrity, comparative quality course ratings and the complex issue of education agent quality assurance.
International education has come a long way, in a short space of time, since each state and territory government had separate regulatory authorities. Until the federal government intervened, each state had jurisdictional oversight of student and education provider policy and procedures. These were replaced in 2011 by the Tertiary Education and Quality Standards Agency (TEQSA) for higher education and the Australian Skills Quality Authority (ASQA) for vocational education. Despite initial teething problems, these two national regulators have made significant improvements in the good governance of a complex industry.
SURPRISING
It is therefore surprising that the Productivity Commission raises the possibility that these two regulators be merged into one entity. Some education institutions, which deliver both higher education and VET courses, would welcome any ensuing reduction in their regulatory reporting burden. However, because each of these national regulators primarily service very different types of education providers and courses, there is little momentum among international education stakeholders for such a merger to be effected.
Control of who is deemed to be a genuine temporary student and student visas has long been vested in our Immigration Department. In recent years this has been justified because of border control concerns.
Yet the Productivity Commission boldly suggests that other factors and government departments should have a stake in the outcomes here. Whereas the Immigration Department’s almost entire focus is on the immigration risk of an education provider, the commission questions the merits of this. Instead, they would like to see factors such as the quality of the education provider’s course delivery, their financial or consumer risk and even student graduation outcomes factored into the visa-issuing process.
Industry groups, such as the International Education Association of Australia, have long argued for just such a comprehensive student visa issuance model. Currently, it is all too easy for certain education providers to tailor their immigration risk rating just long enough to qualify for special visa status. They might be delivering the worst business course in Australia, but that is not being factored into the equation.
The third related area of concern identified in the report is the lack of transparency on the ratings of course quality. This is supported by a recent global survey of 45,000 international students by Hobsons Education Solutions. It highlighted that course rankings now come ahead of education institutions’ overall quality and the choice of country as the key driver of enrolments.
Happily, something is being done about this in Australia. The Quality Indicators for Learning and Teaching (QILT) online platform will be released soon by Education Minister Christopher Pyne. QILT will incorporate student experience, graduate outcomes and employer satisfaction surveys into one easily accessible portal.
There has been a great deal of media interest recently in the complex relationships between education agents and education institutions. Unfortunately, none of this public commentary has mentioned that the federal Education Department is awaiting a report that it has commissioned on this very issue. The report is due by the end of June and more than 1000 key stakeholders have been surveyed already and separate education provider and agent focus groups have been held around the country.
The Productivity Commission report has provided yet one more set of recommendations to a sector that is already suffering from review fatigue. A long-awaited whole-of-government approach is in the mix now.
The government is to finalise soon its National Strategy for International Education. It is not before time that Australia’s third-largest export gets this attention.
 
Phil Honeywood is the executive director of the International Education Association of Australia.
Source: www.afr.com

April 21, 2015
download (1)Eighty eight per cent of international students are satisfied or very satisfied with their overall experience, outperforming similar competitor nations.

A new report on international students’ experiences has found widespread satisfaction across all survey areas — learning, support on arrival, living and support services — at a rate higher than similar competitor nations.
The lone exception is living and accommodation costs which registered only a 50 per cent satisfaction rating.

The biannual International Student Survey was released by federal education minister Christopher Pyne on the back of a NSW report which suggested widespread cheating, low academic standards and even corruption. A report on the ABC tonight is widely expected to come to similar conclusions.

“The report confirms that the reputation of Australian institutions and the quality of teaching are by far the most important factors for international students choosing Australia over other countries,” Mr Pyne said in a statement.
Chris Ziguras, a higher education researcher from RMIT, said the survey threw a positive light on a sector currently under siege by media.
“This report is reassuring to the government and to the sector as a whole that students are coming here for all the right reasons and generally satisfied. Australia is on par with and outperforming other destinations,” Dr Ziguras said.
While the broad brushstroke nature of the overview support lacked nuance, the over all picture was undeniably positive, Dr Ziguras said.
“You’re asking people to tick boxes and you are not getting deep insights. If it was a one-off survey then you’d say it was pretty bland but the fact it’s been done three times in succession shows (the aggregate results) are reassuring.”
Dr Ziguras said he was “dismayed” by last week’s Independent Commission Against Corruption report.
“I’m not sure who they spoke to but they apparently didn’t speak to students,” he said.
“It’s dismaying not because of what it says about the sector but because of the way the sector is perceived. That’s very depressing,” he said.
Dr Ziguras also said he was concerned about the potential for corruption based on the fact international students generate revenue.
“All students generate revenue. The same potential exists for such things with the admittance of domestic students in undergraduate programs with universities dipping lower and lower into ATARs because evert new student brings revenue. There’s the same potential there.”
Fiona Docherty, pro vice-chancellor (international) at UNSW said feedback from international students at her institution didn’t line up with the view promulgated in the ICAC report, especially in relation to the use of agents.
“I’m interested in feedback after students get here and can reflect objectively on their choices to come to that university. Our experience shows that 90 per cent of students are satisfied with their agents,” Ms Docherty said.
Scott Sheppard, deputy vice-chancellor (international) at Queensland University of Technology, also said he struggled to correlate the ICAC report’s findings with the experience of international students at his institution.
“Maybe it’s because we have a relatively low percentage of international student enrolments, but the findings didn’t alight with our experience,” Professor Sheppard said.
 
Source: The Australian

January 30, 2015

Australia-in-Statistics

MORE Australians are born overseas than ever before with 6.6 million residents currently living here arriving from other nations, the highest proportion of the population in 120 years.

Australian Bureau of Statistics data released today shows Australians born outside the country now represent 28 per cent of the population.
“Australia traditionally had a high proportion of migrants, but we’ve now hit a peak not seen since the gold rushes of the late 1800s,” ABS spokeswoman Denise Carlton said.
“Overseas migration has been a large contributor to the total Australian population growth for several years — it has consistently been the main driver since 2005-06, contributing more than 50 per cent of population growth in Australia.
28%Australianisbornoverseas“While the largest migrant groups were people born in the United Kingdom and New Zealand — with a total of over 1.8 million Australian residents being born in those two countries, the next two most common birth places were from the Asian region.
“These were China and India, with around 450,000 and 400,000 people respectively.”
The figures for both countries doubled and tripled over the past decade.
Domestically, people moving to QLD, Victoria and WA continued to outweigh those leaving while there were net losses in residents in every other state and territory.
 
Source: The Australian

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